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authority records

Carol Mayer

  • Person
  • [19-?] -

Carol Elizabeth Mayer is a curator at the Museum of Anthropology (UBC). She is a Canadian citizen. Her educational background includes a Diploma in Arts & Sciences (honours) from Vancouver City College in 1972. In 1974 Carol completed a Bachelor of Arts (honours), majoring in Anthropology, at the University of British Columbia. In 1976 she received a Certificate in Social Anthropology from Cambridge University in Cambridge, UK and in 1996 she received a Ph.D. from the University of Leicester, UK in Museum Studies.

Carol began working at the University of British Columbia Museum of Anthropology (MOA) in 1987 as Curator of Collections and held that position until 1990 when she was appointed the Curator of Ethnology/Ceramics, a position she held until 2005. In 2005 she was appointed Curator of Africa/Pacific, and Curatorial Department Head. As of 2016, she is Curator of Oceania & Africa. In 1993 Carol also became an Instructor in the Department of Anthropology and Sociology. She was the co-founder and the Director of the Museum Studies Certificate Programme for MOA and the Department of Continuing Studies in 1996 and 1997. She has participated in several committees at MOA such as the Acquisition Committee, Collections Committee, Research & Teaching Committee, Executive Committee, and the Renewal Project Team. As Head Curator she is responsible for researching her area of specialty, publishing and presenting papers, representing the Curatorial Department on committees, constructing and overseeing departmental budgets, developing exhibitions and collections, and developing acquisitions policies.

Outside of UBC Carol is an instructor at the University of Victoria in the Faculty of History of Art (1989 to present), and at Emily Carr College of Art and Design in the Visual Arts Department and Art History Department (1993 to present). Previous to MOA Carol worked at The Vancouver Museum where she held several positions from 1975 until 1987.

Carol Mayer has published internationally on curatorship, exhibition, design and ceramics. She is active in provincial, national and international museum associations and has served on boards at all these levels. She has chaired and organized BC Museums Association Conferences as in the year 2000 where she was on the Planning Committee. The Canadian Museums Association awarded her in 1984 with the National Award of Merit for Curatorship and in 1991 with the National Award for Outstanding Achievement. In 2009 she received the International Council of Museums Canada International Achievement award. Many of her exhibition projects have involved collaborative work with communities and their artists, whether they be local or far afield.

Charles E. Borden

  • Person
  • May 15, 1905 - December 25, 1978

Charles E. Borden was born in New York City on May 15, 1905 and grew up in Germany. Borden returned to the United States when he was 22 and received his A.B. in German Literature from the University of California at Los Angeles in 1932. He continued his education at the Berkely campus of the University of California, getting his M.A. in German studies in 1933 and his Ph.D. in 1937. After teaching briefly at Reed College, Portland, Oregon, Borden joined the faculty of teh German Department at the University of British COlumbia in 1939 where he remained until his retirement.

Borden met Alice Victoria Witkin at Berkeley and they married in 1931. They had two sons, John Harvey and Richard Keith. Alice Borden pioneered in teh development of new techniques in pre-school education during the 1950s and 1960s. Her papers are available in teh University of British COlumbia Archives.

Borden had participated in some archaeological excavations around Hamburg as a youth, and in 1943 his interest in prehistoric archaeology was rekindled when he read Philip Drucker's book, Archaeological Survey of the Northern Northeast Coast. Beginning with a small dig in Point Grey in 1945, Borden gradually expanded the scope of his archaeological research to include salvage archaeology and major surveys throughout the province, including in-depth studies in the Fraser Canyon and Delta areas.

In 1949, Borden was appointed Lecturer in Archaeology in the Department of Sociology and Archaeology at the University of British Columbia, while retaining his responsibilities in the German Department. Throughout the balance of his career, from 1949 to 1978, Borden established a highly respected and internationally visible presence in archaeology as an instructor, author, editor, researcher and spokesman for the discipline. He developed the Uniform Site Designation Scheme, known as the Borden system, which has been adopted in most of Canada, and he devoted considerable energy to securing provincial legislation to protect archaeological sites. He was also responsible, in conjunction with Wilson Duff, for the passage in British Columbia of the 1960 Archaeological and Historical Sites Protection Act and the creation of the Archaeological sites Advisory Board.

Alice Borden died in 1971. In 1976 Borden married his second wife, Hala. Charles E. Borden died Christmas afternoon 1978 of a cerebral hemorrhage, having that morning completed a chapter he was writing for Roy Carlson's book on Northwest Coast Art.

Charles Gladstone

  • Person
  • ca. 1877 -1954

Charles Gladstone was a Haida carver, of Skidegate, B.C. He was Bill Reid's grandfather.

Charles S. Brant

  • Person
  • 1919 - 1991

Charles S. Brant was born in Portland, Oregon in 1919. A life-long anthropologist, Brant began his academic career at Reed College where he obtained a B.A. 1941. In 1943, Brant completed his M.A. requirements at Yale University, where he was also University Scholar from 1941-1943. From 1943-1946 Brant served in the U.S. Army as part of the Medical Administration in India and China. With the support of Wenner-Gren and Fulbright awards, Brant undertook pre-doctoral research in the United States and Burma before completing his Ph.D. at Cornell University in 1951.

In the early years of his career, Brant taught at University of Michigan (1947-1948), Colgate University (1951-1952), University of California (1952-1953), and Sarah Lawrence College (1954-1956). Brant was also resident anthropologist at Albert Einstein College from 1956-1957. In 1957, Brant joined Portland State University as Assistant Professor. Brant moved to Canada in 1961 to take the position of Assistant Professor at the University of Alberta, and obtained Canadian citizenship six years later. Brant became head of the Department of Anthropology at the University of Alberta in 1963, and also directed the University’s Boreal Institute for Northern Studies from 1964-1967. In 1970, Brant left Alberta for Montreal to join the faculty at Sir George Williams University (now Concordia) as professor. Brant spent the last 12 years of his career there, retiring from teaching in 1982.

Brant is best known for his work on the Kiowa Apache through his book Jim Whitewolf: The Life of a Kiowa Apache Indian, originally published in 1969. In addition to his work on North American Native peoples and cultures, Brant had research interests in social organization and change in India and China; social change in Arctic regions (especially as it applied to Canada and Greenland); and in the problems of developing countries. During his career, Brant completed fieldwork in Burma, Greenland, the Canadian Arctic, and in Native American communities in California and Oklahoma.

Brant and his wife Jane were both photographers and life-long social activists. They had two sons. After his retirement in 1982, Brant moved to Gabriola Island, British Columbia. Brant passed away in 1991 at age 71 in Nanaimo, British Columbia.

Charles Sidney Leary

  • March 4, 1883 - 1950

Charles Sidney Leary (often referred to as Sid Leary) was born in England and moved overseas in 1907, eventually settling in Nakusp, British Columbia. He began working in the lumber industry and eventually came to own a mill. He served as an officer in the first World War, eventually rising to the rank of Captain. He was posted to Cyprus for timber operations in 1917 and it was there that he began to collect ancient artifacts. On returning to Canada, Leary continued to work in the timber industry. He later served as an MLA in the British Columbia Legislature, including two years as the Minister of Public Works. His collection of antiquities acquired in Cyprus was eventually shipped to Canada. After his death in 1950, his family donated his collection to the Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia.

Charles William John Eliot

  • Person
  • December 8, 1928 - May 20, 2008

Born in 1928 in Rawalpindi, Pakistan, C.W.J. Eliot was the UBC Department of Classics' first professional archaeologist. He studied Classics at the University of Toronto, eventually seeing his dissertation published in 1962. He also studied at the American School of Classical Studies in Athens. He began teaching at UBC in 1957 and stayed on until 1971 when he left for the American School of Classical studies at Athens to become professor of Archaeology there. He later served as President and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Prince Edward Island.He was a member of the Order of Canada and was posthumously recognized as the founder of the University of Prince Edward Island.

Collections Area

  • Corporate body
  • 1947 -

Currently part of the Collections Care, Management and Access department at the Museum of Anthropology (MOA), the Collections area is responsible for:

• care of the object collections
• registering and processing acquisitions
• managing the storage, movement and handling of objects
• managing the documentation of objects
• providing access to the collection
• dealing with requests for information about the collection
• managing the museum collection’s database
• managing the data in the museum’s online catalogue
• borrowing and safe keeping of objects for short term and long term loans
• exhibition installations, de-installations
• loaning out of objects to other institutions and individuals
• object photography
• deaccessioning museum objects
• providing training opportunities for students and interns
• managing travelling exhibitions

Prior to 1976, the Curator of Ethnology, Audrey Hawthorn, was responsible for the above-mentioned activities, with the help of student volunteers and assistants, but specific duties were never clarified, nor were they officially attributed to particular individuals. From the late 1970s onwards, the Curator of Documentation and the Curator of Collections were responsible for care of the collections. By 1990, the staff had expanded to include a Collections Manager, part-time Loans Manager and Collections intern. In 1999, an Assistant Collections Manager was added. In the late 1990s Collections and Conservation staff became a department (Collections Care & Management), with a representative Head on the Executive Committee. From 2005 to 2010 the Collections and Conservation staff managed the Collections Research Enhancement Project (CREP) section of the MOA Renewal Project, which included more than 20 full-time temporary staff. In 2015, due to restructuring, the Collections Care & Management department was merged with the Library and Archives, forming the Collections Care, Management and Access Department.

Currently (as of 2017), the Collections staff consists of the Collections Manager, Loans Manager, two Collections Assistants and a part-time Imager (1-2 days/wk), in addition to temporary student and contract workers. See the fonds level description for a list of individual Collections staff names.

Collections Care, Management and Access department

  • Corporate body
  • 2015 -

The Collection’s Care, Management and Access department (CCMA) of the Museum of Anthropology (MOA) was formed April 1, 2015, as part of a larger organizational restructuring. It combined the previously separate Collections Care & Management department and Library & Archives into a single department. The core functions of the former departments remain largely the same: to manage and preserve object, paper and digital collections; to facilitate public, community and academic access; and, to collaborate in the dissemination of knowledge through exhibitions, publications and training. One of the main goals in combining these previously distinct departments into CCMA was to better integrate the digital, archival and object collections (the tangible and intangible aspects of culture) to facilitate access and interpretation.

Members of CCMA also work with other units on UBC’s campus - including the Barber Learning Centre, the Endangered Languages Program and the development of the Truth and Reconciliation Unit – and help mobilize these relationships to assist with the implantation of new language initiatives at MOA.

The Head of CCMA is Heidi Swierenga, who became Head when the department was established in 2015 and remains so to the present (as of 2017).

For more detailed information about each of the areas within CCMA, see the records for Collections, Conservation, and the Audrey & Harry Hawthorn Library and Archives.

List of Past and Current CCMA Staff

• Audrey Hawthorn -- Curator of Ethnology, 1947-1983

• Audrey Shane -- Archivist/Librarian, 1975-1979
-- Curator of Documentation , 1979-1987

• Elizabeth Johnson -- Curator of Collections, 1979 - 1986
-- Curator of Ethnology/Documentation, 1986 - 2006

• Miriam Clavir -- Senior Conservator, 1980-2004

• Mauray Toutloff -- Conservator, 2009 - present (2017)

• Carol Mayer -- Museum curator (various titles), 1987 – present (2017)
-- Librarian (unofficial title), ca. 2000's

• Ann Stevenson -- Collections Manager, 1990- ca. 2003
-- RRN Programme Manager, 2004 - 2005
-- Information Manager , 2006 – present
-- AHHLA Department Head, 2011/2012 - present (2017)

• Allison Cronin -- Assistant Collections Manager, 1990-1996
-- Manager of Loans/Projects, 1996-2003
-- Loan Manager, 2004 - 2005

• Nancy Bruegeman -- Assistant Collections Manager, 1996-2003
-- Acting Collections Manager, ca. 2004-2005
-- Collections Manager, 2005 - present (2017)

• Darrin Morrison -- Preventative Conservation Specialist, 1991 - 1993
-- Project Manager, Conservation, 1993 – ca. 2003
-- Manager Conservation/Design, ca. 2004 - 2005

• Heidi Swierenga -- Collections/Conservation Intern, 1997-1998
-- Assistant Conservator, 2000- ca. 2002
-- Conservator, 2002 – ca.2013
-- Senior Conservator, ca. 2013-present (2017)
-- Collection Care & Management Dept. Head, ca. 2005-2016
-- CCMA Department Head, 2015 - present (2017)

• Susan Buchanan -- Documentation Coordinator/Collections Project Manager, 2004 - 2005
-- Collections and Loans Coordinator, 2005 -2014
-- Department Head, 2010 - 2011

• Candace Beisel -- Collections Technician, 2010-present (2017)

• Teija Dedi -- Acting Collections Research Facilitator, ca. 2012-2014
--Interim Loans Manager, 2014
-- Loans Manager, 2014 – present (2017)

• Caitlin Pilon -- Collections Assistant, 2014 – present (2017)

• Lisa Bruggen-Cate -- Collections Assistant, 2002 – 2005

• Magdalena Moore -- Collections & Loan Coordinator, 2006 – 2007

• Shabnam Honarbakhsh -- Acting Collections & Loans Coordinator, 2009 – 2010
-- Acting Conservator, 2010 – 2011
-- Project Conservator, 2012 - 2013

• Krista Bergstrom -- Collections Assistant, 2006 - 2008
-- Collections Research Facilitator, 2008 – 2016

• Justine Dainard -- Librarian, 2002 – 2005
-- Research Manager (Library), 2006 - 2008

• Krisztina Laszlo -- Archivist, 1999 – 2014

• Shannon LaBelle -- Research Manager (Library), ca. 2009 - 2014

• Alissa Cherry -- Research Manager (Library & Archives), 2014 – present (2017)

• Gerry Lawson -- Oral History & Language Lab Coordinator, 2009 – present (2017)

• Elizabeth McManus - Archivist, 2014 – 2015

• Jessica Bushey -- Digitization Lead, 2006 - 2011

• Kyla Bailey -- Imager, 2007 – present (2017)

Note: In addition to the staff listed above, numerous museum, library, and archives assistants, students, and interns were hired on a short term basis for CCMA work.

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