Showing 11 results

authority records
Corporate body

Native Education College

  • NEC
  • Corporate body
  • 1967-

Although NEC (formerly Native Education Centre) had existed since 1967, it was in 1979 that the society was formed to assume control and broaden the scope of education to include academic post-secondary courses. The school moved into its current facilities in 1985, a building featuring architectural features of a traditional Pacific Coast longhouse.

University of British Columbia. Museum of Anthropology. Public Relations and Communications Office

  • Corporate body
  • 1982 - 1990

From 1978 to 1981, the functions of the Public Relations and Communications Office, including public programming and public relations activities, were fulfilled by the museum’s Extension Curator.

In 1982, Ruth Anderson was appointed Public Relations Coordinator. In 1985, the position was re-titled Public Relations Officer. In January 1986, Christopher Miller took over the position of Public Relations Officer. In 1987, the position’s title was changed to Public Relations and Development Officer, and was changed again in March 1990 to Public Relations and Marketing Officer.

In October, 1990, the functions of the Public Relations Office were assumed by the newly created Communications Office, headed by Kersti Krug, Director of Communications. From 1994 to 1998, Anna Pappalardo held this position and in 1998 Jennifer Webb took over. During Webb's time the Public and Community Services Department was created, and in 2006 the position was renamed Communications Manager. Webb held this position until 2013. This management position has often been supported by one or more assistants.

The Public Relations and Communications Office was established to increase the public’s awareness of the Museum of Anthropology and to promote its programs and special events. Functioning as an intermediary between the museum and the public, the Office is responsible for developing the public image of the museum. To achieve these functions, the Communications Manager is responsible for developing and maintaining media contacts, holding press conferences, writing press releases, advertising and producing publications about the museum, its programs, events, and services, building relationships with tour guides and hotel operators, and developing techniques for increasing museum attendance. In addition, the Manager is also responsible for coordinating fundraising and promotional events, conducting VIP visits, and representing the museum on various committees and at community events. Historically, this position has also been responsible for administering the museum’s Print Out Art Loan program and acting as a liaison for the Gallery Guides program.

President’s Planning and Coordinating Committee

  • Corporate body
  • [1971 - 1976]

The purpose of this committee, as with all other UBC Planning Coordinating Committees, was to consider all of the interests involved in the development of the new building for the Museum of Anthropology. The Committee was formed to ensure that balanced recommendations, taking into account the overall interests of the University, could be made to the President. Committee members participated in defining terms of construction, operation, and maintenance of the museum, including choosing the architect, deciding location, and securing funds for the continuing operation of the building.

The development and construction of the museum was, in part, made possible by a federal grant, Canada’s 1971 Centennial Gift to the people of British Columbia. The University’s Senate Committee on Academic Building Needs recognized the need for a new museum, linked to the department of Anthropology and Sociology. In 1971 the President’s Planning and Coordinating Committee was formed by then University President Walter Gage to assist in the planning and construction of the Museum of Man building (now known as the Museum of Anthropology, changed in March 1973), and the new facility in the Department of Anthropology and Sociology.

Dean of Arts, Douglas T. Kenny, chaired this committee. Other members included Dr. Michael Ames, Mrs. Audrey Hawthorn, and Dr. Harry Hawthorn, among others (Wilson Duff, Marjorie Halpin, Ingeborg Ruus, Audrey Shane, Gloria Webster.)

Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC)

  • Corporate body
  • 1989 -

The Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation is the result of a call by Australian Prime Minister Bob Hawke in January 1989 for Asian-Pacific economies to consult on how they could effectively cooperate and increase trade and investment flows in the Asia-Pacific. Australia’s motive was to create an Asia-Pacific economic identity, of which it would be an integral part. Japan endorsed the Australian proposal and became the second driving force in the creation of APEC. The first APEC meeting of trade and foreign ministers took place in Canberra in November of 1989 (with twelve attendees: Australia, Brunei, Canada, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and the U.S.).
A summit or Leaders’ Meeting has become an annual event since President Clinton invited leaders to Blake Island in 1993. The first APEC Leaders’ Meeting was held in Seattle in November 1993. This first Leaders’ Meeting of economies represented half the world’s population and 56% of its GNP. A year later all APEC leaders met at Bogor, Indonesia, and at that meeting the Leaders resolved to move to free trade and investment by 2010 for industrialized member economies, and by 2020 for developing member economies. The 1995 meetings were in Osaka, Japan where the Osaka Action Agenda was agreed to, setting out a template for future APEC work towards common goals. The Philippines convened the APEC Leaders’ Meeting in 1996 at Subic Bay. The Leaders’ Meeting was held in Vancouver, Canada in 1997 at the Museum of Anthropology on the University of British Columbia campus.
The following countries are members of APEC as of 1999: Australia, Brunei, Darussalam, Canada, Chile, China, Hong Kong SAR, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Philippines, Russia, Singapore, Chinese Taipei, Thailand, United States, and Vietnam.
APEC has two standing committees, 10 working groups, and a few other forums that report to the Senior Officials Meeting. The two committees are the Committee for Trade and Investment (CTI) and the Economic Committee (EC). The CTI deals with trade and investment liberalization and business facilitation concerns. The role of the EC continues to evolve. It is primarily responsible for providing the Senior Officials Meeting with information and analysis on broad, crosscutting issues which are not easily handled by one of the working groups.
The ten working groups are: Trade and Investment Data, Trade Promotion, Investment and Industrial Science and Technology, Human Resource Development, Energy, Marine Resource Conservation, Telecommunications, Fisheries, Transportation, and Tourism.

Collections Care, Management and Access department

  • Corporate body
  • 2015 -

The Collection’s Care, Management and Access department (CCMA) of the Museum of Anthropology (MOA) was formed April 1, 2015, as part of a larger organizational restructuring. It combined the previously separate Collections Care & Management department and Library & Archives into a single department. The core functions of the former departments remain largely the same: to manage and preserve object, paper and digital collections; to facilitate public, community and academic access; and, to collaborate in the dissemination of knowledge through exhibitions, publications and training. One of the main goals in combining these previously distinct departments into CCMA was to better integrate the digital, archival and object collections (the tangible and intangible aspects of culture) to facilitate access and interpretation.

Members of CCMA also work with other units on UBC’s campus - including the Barber Learning Centre, the Endangered Languages Program and the development of the Truth and Reconciliation Unit – and help mobilize these relationships to assist with the implantation of new language initiatives at MOA.

The Head of CCMA is Heidi Swierenga, who became Head when the department was established in 2015 and remains so to the present (as of 2017).

For more detailed information about each of the areas within CCMA, see the records for Collections, Conservation, and the Audrey & Harry Hawthorn Library and Archives.

List of Past and Current CCMA Staff

• Audrey Hawthorn -- Curator of Ethnology, 1947-1983

• Audrey Shane -- Archivist/Librarian, 1975-1979
-- Curator of Documentation , 1979-1987

• Elizabeth Johnson -- Curator of Collections, 1979 - 1986
-- Curator of Ethnology/Documentation, 1986 - 2006

• Miriam Clavir -- Senior Conservator, 1980-2004

• Mauray Toutloff -- Conservator, 2009 - present (2017)

• Carol Mayer -- Museum curator (various titles), 1987 – present (2017)
-- Librarian (unofficial title), ca. 2000's

• Ann Stevenson -- Collections Manager, 1990- ca. 2003
-- RRN Programme Manager, 2004 - 2005
-- Information Manager , 2006 – present
-- AHHLA Department Head, 2011/2012 - present (2017)

• Allison Cronin -- Assistant Collections Manager, 1990-1996
-- Manager of Loans/Projects, 1996-2003
-- Loan Manager, 2004 - 2005

• Nancy Bruegeman -- Assistant Collections Manager, 1996-2003
-- Acting Collections Manager, ca. 2004-2005
-- Collections Manager, 2005 - present (2017)

• Darrin Morrison -- Preventative Conservation Specialist, 1991 - 1993
-- Project Manager, Conservation, 1993 – ca. 2003
-- Manager Conservation/Design, ca. 2004 - 2005

• Heidi Swierenga -- Collections/Conservation Intern, 1997-1998
-- Assistant Conservator, 2000- ca. 2002
-- Conservator, 2002 – ca.2013
-- Senior Conservator, ca. 2013-present (2017)
-- Collection Care & Management Dept. Head, ca. 2005-2016
-- CCMA Department Head, 2015 - present (2017)

• Susan Buchanan -- Documentation Coordinator/Collections Project Manager, 2004 - 2005
-- Collections and Loans Coordinator, 2005 -2014
-- Department Head, 2010 - 2011

• Candace Beisel -- Collections Technician, 2010-present (2017)

• Teija Dedi -- Acting Collections Research Facilitator, ca. 2012-2014
--Interim Loans Manager, 2014
-- Loans Manager, 2014 – present (2017)

• Caitlin Pilon -- Collections Assistant, 2014 – present (2017)

• Lisa Bruggen-Cate -- Collections Assistant, 2002 – 2005

• Magdalena Moore -- Collections & Loan Coordinator, 2006 – 2007

• Shabnam Honarbakhsh -- Acting Collections & Loans Coordinator, 2009 – 2010
-- Acting Conservator, 2010 – 2011
-- Project Conservator, 2012 - 2013

• Krista Bergstrom -- Collections Assistant, 2006 - 2008
-- Collections Research Facilitator, 2008 – 2016

• Justine Dainard -- Librarian, 2002 – 2005
-- Research Manager (Library), 2006 - 2008

• Krisztina Laszlo -- Archivist, 1999 – 2014

• Shannon LaBelle -- Research Manager (Library), ca. 2009 - 2014

• Alissa Cherry -- Research Manager (Library & Archives), 2014 – present (2017)

• Gerry Lawson -- Oral History & Language Lab Coordinator, 2009 – present (2017)

• Elizabeth McManus - Archivist, 2014 – 2015

• Jessica Bushey -- Digitization Lead, 2006 - 2011

• Kyla Bailey -- Imager, 2007 – present (2017)

Note: In addition to the staff listed above, numerous museum, library, and archives assistants, students, and interns were hired on a short term basis for CCMA work.

Douglas & McIntyre

  • Corporate body
  • 1971 -

Douglas & McIntyre was founded in 1971. It has since established itself as one of Canada’s largest independent book publishing houses with offices in Toronto and Vancouver. It consists of three publishing units, Douglas & McIntyre, Greystone Books and Groundwood Books. Douglas & McIntyre publishes books about many different subjects, including First Nations art and culture, food and wine, Canadian issues and politics, and the environment.

Friends of the Museum of Anthropology

  • Corporate body
  • 1977 - ca. 1985

Formally incorporated on December 23rd 1977, the Friends of the Museum of Anthropology at U.B.C. (University of British Columbia) was a society that had four main objectives:

• To promote interest in, and acquaint the public with the Museum of Anthropology at U.B.C.
• To provide for the holding of educational lectures, exhibitions, public meetings, classes and conferences on the subject of anthropology
• To acquire, accept, solicit or receive any gift or real or personal property as a contribution or addition to the funds of the society
• To receive, hold, distribute, invest and reinvest contributions from donors for the collections of and operation of the Museum of Anthropology at U.B.C.

The operations of the society were physically carried out in the museum. The affairs of the society were managed by a board of 24 directors; six were directly tasked with its initial establishment, while another 18 were elected at the first annual general meeting. Various committees and sub-committees were established, including the executive committee, who had the power to exercise the will of the board. Other committees included the membership committee and the sub-committees on Finance and Fundraising. Michael Ames, then-Director of the Museum of Anthropology, worked as the secretary for the society for most of its life-span. The society was directly involved with a 1981 benefit concert that took place in the Haida House to raise funds for a special gallery for a Haida canoe they wished to acquire. The friends’ peak of activity was from 1978-1982, after which time it became less and less active; dissolution occurred sometime around 1985.

University of British Columbia. Museum of Anthropology. Public Programming and Education

  • Corporate body
  • ca. 1971 -

Audrey Hawthorn, as the Museum of Anthropology first official Curator, was the person initially responsible for Public Programming and Education. In Hawthorn’s time the function involved mainly exhibitions and the programs surrounding them, as well as raising the profile of the museum. When plans for a new building got underway more formal programming guidelines were developed. A Museum Programming Committee was formed in 1971, charged with the function of suggesting programmes for the new museum, which was at this time still in the planning phase. Along with other museum committees, this committee was given the task of developing programming ideas to help dictate the needs of the new building. Their mandate was to establish policy guidelines for museum programming.

In 1974 the Museum Public Programming Committee decided on two spheres of programming: academic and public programmes. Since this time, these functions have been shared by different positions with various titles. These position titles include Extension Curator, Education Curator, Museum Programme Coordinator, Public Programming Coordinator and Curator of Public Programmes.

Individuals that have been involved in these functions were often employed full time in the Museum, while others were employed part-time as museum curators and part-time as professors in the Department of Anthropology. These curators have traditionally had a very fluid function and their roles have included many additional responsibilities outside of public programming and education. These individuals include:

-Audrey Hawthorn, Curator (1947-1977)
-Elvi Whittaker, Coordinator of Public Programming (1973-1976)
-Hindaleah (Hindy) Ratner, Extension Curator (1978-1995) (on leave May -October 1984, January-July 1985, and September 1986-February 1987)
-Madeline Bronsdon Rowan, Curator of Ethnology and Public Programming and professor of Anthropology (April 1977-December 1986) (on leave 1979 and 1986)
-Margaret Stott, Curator of Ethnology and Education, and Professor of Anthropology (1979-1990)
-Roberta Kremer, Acting Education Curator (July 1989-June 1991) Acting Curator of Education and Volunteer Coordinator (1990-1991) Acting Education/Public Programming Curator (while Jill Baird was on leave January 2007- January 2008)
-Louise Jackson, Curator of Ethnology and Education (July 1991-1995) (on leave 1993-1995)
-Rosa Ho, Curator of Art and Public Programming (January 1988-1999) Curator of Art and Public Programming and Education (1992, 1996-1999)
-Jill Baird, Education/Public Programming Curator (March 1999-present) (on leave January 2007-January 2008)

Graduate students Margaret Holm and Susan Hull coordinated extension duties and programmes in Rowan and Ratners' absence in 1986 and 1987. There was no official replacement for the Extension or Education Curators during the absence of Rowan and Ratner nor with their resignations in 1986. This continued until Rosa Ho was appointed as the full-time Curator of Art and Public Programming in January 1988. She added Education Curator to her title in 1992 and again after the departure of Jackson in 1996. She held the position of Curator of Art, Public Programming and Education until she left in 1999.

Jill Baird took over the position of Education/Public Programming Curator in March 1999. This new position included the majority of the functions of the Art and Public Programming Curator, as well as the traditional functions of both the Extension and Education Curator and some additional responsibilities.

The function of Public Programming and Education has traditionally been responsible for exhibitions, education, public programs, and extension activities at the Museum of Anthropology. The primary function of this area was to locate cultures within the world context of art, to prepare exhibits, including travelling exhibits, to enhance cultural understanding and enjoyment of cultural diversity, and to cut across the disciplinary boundaries of art history, anthropology, and archaeology. These functions were developed in particular ways for specialized audiences through Exhibitions, Education, Public Programmes, and Extension activities.

The Education function has included establishing and supervising school programmes for students and teachers, and training members of the Volunteer Associates to conduct these programmes. Programmed activities included orientation walks, self-guided visits to the museum, cultural performances, and a variety of participatory sessions designed to complement the school curriculum, this included the development of units of curriculum and "touchable" artifact kits. School artifact kits included specially designed information and artifacts that were packaged and lent out to British Columbia schools to further anthropological education outside of the museum setting. The education programming also provided professional development workshops for teachers and students.

Public Programmes included artists' talks and panel discussions, storytelling, music, performances, workshops, lectures, non-credit courses, museum tours, identification clinics and audio-visual presentations.

Extension activities included the loaning out of exhibit materials and creation of travelling exhibitions. This included coordinating the development of in-house exhibitions, special events and lectures in conjunction with exhibits, exhibits in office spaces, and installations in off-campus locations.

The Museum's current public programming mandate, as of 1999, seeks to provide a forum for cultural expression, experimentation, and exchange of views. This is done through a variety of programs, including public talks, demonstration, guided gallery tours, lectures, hands-on workshops, artist talks, music, performances, film viewing and educational programs.

The Museum's current educational programming mandate is to develop and deliver quality programs to elementary and secondary school students that introduces them to other cultures and makes innovative use of the Museum's collections, exhibitions, and other resources. These programs include elementary and secondary classes, special programs developed in conjunction with temporary exhibitions, the Musqueam School, and summer day camps. Many of the educational programs are jointly developed with artists and other institutions.

Collections Area

  • Corporate body
  • 1947 -

Currently part of the Collections Care, Management and Access department at the Museum of Anthropology (MOA), the Collections area is responsible for:

• care of the object collections
• registering and processing acquisitions
• managing the storage, movement and handling of objects
• managing the documentation of objects
• providing access to the collection
• dealing with requests for information about the collection
• managing the museum collection’s database
• managing the data in the museum’s online catalogue
• borrowing and safe keeping of objects for short term and long term loans
• exhibition installations, de-installations
• loaning out of objects to other institutions and individuals
• object photography
• deaccessioning museum objects
• providing training opportunities for students and interns
• managing travelling exhibitions

Prior to 1976, the Curator of Ethnology, Audrey Hawthorn, was responsible for the above-mentioned activities, with the help of student volunteers and assistants, but specific duties were never clarified, nor were they officially attributed to particular individuals. From the late 1970s onwards, the Curator of Documentation and the Curator of Collections were responsible for care of the collections. By 1990, the staff had expanded to include a Collections Manager, part-time Loans Manager and Collections intern. In 1999, an Assistant Collections Manager was added. In the late 1990s Collections and Conservation staff became a department (Collections Care & Management), with a representative Head on the Executive Committee. From 2005 to 2010 the Collections and Conservation staff managed the Collections Research Enhancement Project (CREP) section of the MOA Renewal Project, which included more than 20 full-time temporary staff. In 2015, due to restructuring, the Collections Care & Management department was merged with the Library and Archives, forming the Collections Care, Management and Access Department.

Currently (as of 2017), the Collections staff consists of the Collections Manager, Loans Manager, two Collections Assistants and a part-time Imager (1-2 days/wk), in addition to temporary student and contract workers. See the fonds level description for a list of individual Collections staff names.

DELETE

  • Corporate body