Showing 310 results

authority records

Thomas Laurie

  • Person

Thomas Laurie and Mildred Laurie were a married couple who managed the B.C. Packers general store in Alert Bay for many years. Their daughters Leslie and Cathie attended the first local integrated school there in the 1950s, and their son Tom was born in Alert Bay in 1962. After leaving Alert Bay in 1964 the family moved to Powell River, where Thomas and Mildred ran the Columbia Store, and then to Ocean Falls, where they managed the mill store. The Lauries later relocated to Kitimat and then to Prince George, where they ran a motel for 22 years.

Stuart James Schofield

  • Person
  • 1883 - 1947

Stuart Schofield was born in Kent, England. After moving to Kingston, Ontario as a child, he completed his B.A. (1904), M.A. (1906), and B.Sc. (1908) at Queenʹs University. He later completed a Ph.D. at M.I.T. (1912). He began his geological career with the Geological Survey of Canada as a student assistant to R.W. Brock in 1906. In 1915, Schofield accepted Brockʹs invitation to start courses in Geology and Mineralogy at the newly‐established University of British Columbia. He was appointed professor of Structural Geography at the university in 1920. After accepting responsibility for making a geological survey of Hong Kong in 1906, Brock sent Schofield to undertake a general reconnaissance for six months. Ill health forced Schofield to retire from UBC in 1940; he died in Vancouver in 1947.

Stephen Inglis

  • Person
  • 1949 -

Dr. Stephen Inglis was born in 1949. He has a BA and a PhD (1984) in Anthropology from UBC. He received an MA in Museology and Indian Art from Calcutta University. Dr. Inglis was a guest curator for the MOA exhibit “Calendar Prints: Popular Art of South India” which was displayed at the Museum from September 1983 to January 1985. He is currently the Director General of Research and Collections at the Canadian Museum of Civilization (CMC). Dr. Inglis specializes in artists and their communities, particularly in South Asia.

Selig Kaplan

  • Person

Selig Kaplan is a professor emeritus at the University of California, Berkeley, Department of Nuclear Engineering. He and his wife Gloria have been longtime collectors of Northwest Coast First Nations artwork.

Kaplan family

  • Family

Selig Kaplan is a professor emeritus at the University of California, Berkeley, Department of Nuclear Engineering. He and his wife Gloria have been longtime collectors of Northwest Coast First Nations artwork.

Robert Keziere

  • Person
  • 1937 -

Robert Keziere was born in Vancouver in 1937. He has been chief photographer at the Vancouver Art Gallery as well as a freelance art photographer, and his work has appeared in a number of books.

Richard Cotton

  • Person

Richard Cotton was stationed in Terrace, BC in the 1960s.

Reginald Robinson

  • Person
  • 1900 - 1989

Reginald Robinson was born in Stevenage, England. In 1920, he immigrated to Canada. For the next twenty-five years, Robinson was employed in various capacities until Canada became involved in the Second World War and he enlisted in the military. Originally he was stationed in Victoria, BC, but in early 1945 he was shipped to Darwin, Australia, as a member of the secret 1st Canadian Special Wireless Group. While stationed in Darwin, Sergeant Robinson obtained special permission from his commanding officer to photograph the native population, members of the neighboring Aboriginal tribes. During his stay, he also received many artifacts as gifts, which he carefully shipped home to Canada.

After the war, Robinson led an accomplished civilian life. He was the first paid manager of the South Burnaby Credit Union, an active community volunteer, an amateur photographer, and a devoted husband and father.

R.M. Ferguson

  • Person

Biographical information unavailable.

R.A. Brooks

  • Person

R.A. Brooks was a Vancouver resident who had a curio shop for a number of years. He died c. 1949 and his collection of stone heads – ‘Brooks heads’ – were offered for sale in his shop by his widow, Mrs. Mabel Orr Brooks. Brooks had apparently collected the stones over a number of years from a mound near the Fraser River

Penelope Connell

  • Person

No biographical information available.

Mary Tucker

  • Person

No biographical information available.

Mary Lipsett

  • Person

Biographical information unavailable.

Marie-Claire Delahaye

  • Person

Marie-Claire Delahaye worked as a nurse in Barotseland in western Zambia from 1956 – 1960 and again from 1962 – 1965. In that time she spent one year at Mwandi, one year at Nalolo and two and a half at Senanga. Upon her return in 1962 she lived for one year at Lealui before returning to Senanga until 1965. Delahaye spoke Silozi, the language of the Lozi people, exclusively while living in Zambia. She worked in missionary hospitals and dispensaries.

Margaret Stott

  • Person

Margaret Stott served as the Curator of Ethnology and Education at the University of British Columbia's Museum of Anthropology from 1979-1990. Stott's duties included public programs, education, and curator activities. Stott also gave teacher and museum workshops as well as teaching anthropology classes at the University of British Columbia. Margaret Stott obtained her Bachelor of Arts from the University of British Columbia in 1966. In 1969, Stott received her Master in Anthropology at McGill University. From 1969 to 1972, she served as archivist at the National Museum of Man in Ottawa and from 1973 to 1975, she worked as the Anthropology Exhibits Coordinator for the Museum of Man. From 1979 to 1990, Stott served as the Curator of Ethnology at UBC's Museum of Anthropology. Meanwhile in 1982, Stott obtained her PhD in Social Anthropology from the University of London. In 1990, Margaret Stott completed the Foundation Programme in Tourism Management at Simon Fraser University. From 1979 onwards, Stott also worked as a museum consultant. Major exhibitions curated or coordinated by Margaret Stott include: "'Ksan: Breath of Our Grandfathers", a travelling exhibition of the National Museum of Man 91972-1973); "Ontario Prehistory", a travelling exhibition of the National Museum of Man (1973); "Athapaskan Peoples: Strangers of the North", an exhibition prepared by the National Museum of Man and the Royal Scottish Museum (1973-1975); "Objects from Northwest Coast Indian Cultures", a touchable exhibit for visually handicapped at the UBC Museum of Anthropology (1979-1980); "Kwaqiutl Echo Dance Costume" for the Guaranteed Trust Company (1980); "Northwest Coast Indian Art", a display in the Air Canada Maple Leaf Lounge at Vancouver International Airport (1980 onwards); "Form, Manufacture, Function, and Meaning" exhibited at MOA (1981-1982); "Art of the Northwest Coast Indians" was an exhibition for the UBC Hospital (1983); "O Canada!" at MOA (1984); "Blue Jeans" at MOA (1985); "To market, to market...the culture exchange", an exhibition about tourism and art at MOA (1989); and a Nuxalk exhibit (untitled) of the Canadian Museum of Civilization. Stott also worked on a number of audio-visual productions. "MOA Presents" consists of 8 half-hour productions for cable and educational television networks in British Columbia 1980-1981. "MOA Presents Series 2", consists of 6 half-hour programs for the Knowledge Network, public programming in British Columbia 1981-1982. "A Curator's Guide to MOA", a 30-minute audio tour tape, was produced in 1983. Stott is credited with a number of published independent and collaborative articles. Some of these titles include "Guide to the UBC Museum of Anthropology", "Bella Coola Ceremony and Art". Among her published journal articles: "Economic Transition and the Family in Mykonos, Greece"; "Video Disc: Museums and the Future"; "Object, Context, and Process: Approaches to Teaching about Material Culture".

Madeline Bronsdon Rowan

  • Person
  • 1940 -

Madeline Bronsdon Rowan is a Canadian citizen, born on February 21, 1940. Her educational background includes a Bachelors degree in Anthropology and English Literature in 1963 and a Masters degree in Anthropology in 1966 from the University of British Columbia. Madeline Bronsdon Rowan was formerly in a joint position as the curator of education/public programming at the Museum of Anthropology and senior instructor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia from 1975 to 1987. Her curatorial responsibilities included establishing and supervising school programmes for students and teachers, and to train members of the Volunteer Associates to conduct these programmes. In addition, she was responsible for providing professional development workshops for teachers and students in the Faculty of Education department at the University of British Columbia, and to develop units of curriculum and "touchable" artifact kits (in co-operation with various natives groups and experts). Rowan was also the supervisor for the Native Youth Project and the Coast Salish Project, these two projects are designed to encourage First Nation's youths to conduct lectures and give tours to museum patrons on traditional and contemporary Northwest Coast Native culture. Rowan's teaching areas of specialization for the anthropology department are: Introductory Anthropology, Material Culture and Education, Netsilik Inuit Culture and Northwest Coast Indian Studies. She was also an active board member of Native Indian Youth Advisory Society from 1982 to 1987. The society, under the direction of Mrs. Brenda Taylor, sponsored the Native Youth Project. Rowan was the curator in charge of the following exhibits: Dress and Identity, a cross-cultural display on the nature of attire expressing identity and status within a community (1977); East African Medicine, an exhibit based on the artifact collection of Dr. T. Margetts that demonstrates various methods of healing (1978); and Cedar, the use of trees in the Northwest Culture, co-authored by guest curator Hilary Stewart (1984). She also designed the "Netsilik Culture" artifact and raw materials teaching kit and a supporting curriculum unit, An Introduction to Netsilik Culture: A Seasonal Station Study, in 1983. Madeline Bronsdon Rowan authored and co-authored several published and unpublished articles relating to the Native Youth Project, Netsilik culture, native education, museums in relation to anthropology, museums and the school environment, and artifacts as art. This includes her articles "Making Museums Meaningful for Blind Children", co-authored with Sally Rogow, Faculty of Education, Gazette, July 1978; Guide to the U.B.C. Museum of Anthropology co-authored with Dr. Margaret Stott; and "U.B.C. Museum of Anthropology Native Youth Project", Urban Indian Multicultural Conference. Vancouver, October 1981.

Lyle Wilson

  • Person
  • 1955 -

Lyle Wilson, a Haisla artist, was born in 1955 at Butedale, British Columbia. He grew up in the northern coastal communities of Kitimat and Kitimat Village. Wilson grew up watching his uncle, Sam Robinson, create carvings out of wood, and he later became a skilled carver and artist himself. In his explorations of art, Wilson brings together his fine-arts training and knowledge of Western European art history with his understanding of Haisla art and tradition and experiments with a range of media. In addition to the carvings he creates out of wood, horn and ivory, Wilson also creates metalwork, jewelry, drawings, and paintings.

Wilson attended the Emily Carr School of Art and Design and the University of British Columbia in the 1980s, where he was educated in European art traditions. At UBC Wilson was exposed to a wealth of Northwest Coast First Nations’ art. He studied artifacts, photographs of artifacts, and learned from practicing artists. He worked as a Project Consultant in the development of the Canadian Museum of Civilization’s Grand Hall exhibition and was an artist-in-residence at the UBC Museum of Anthropology. Wilson has worked on commissions and exhibited his work both locally in Vancouver as well as internationally in Osaka, Japan and New York.

Ken Kuramoto

  • Person

Ken Kuramoto was contracted by the Museum of Anthropology in 1980 to produce the film Celebration of the Raven. At this time, Kuramoto was director of K.K Enterprises.

Jonathan Griffin

  • Person
  • [19--?] -

Jonathan Griffin was a UBC student. In 1974 Griffin took a trip to Anthony Island in Haida Gwaii, where he took extensive pictures of the conditions of the poles at a deserted Haida village.

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