Showing 193 results

authority records
Person

Kersti Krug

  • Person
  • [19-?] -

Kersti Krug is a researcher and writer in the field of non-profit management, and a former Director of Communications and Manager of Research and Evaluation at the Museum of Anthropology (MOA) at the University of British Columbia (UBC).

Before joining MOA, Krug was Senior Personnel Advisor to the Auditor General of Canada (1980) and Assistant Director of the National Gallery of Canada (1980-1988). Between 1991 and 1997, she worked for the UBC Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration as a researcher, instructor, and Acting Director of the Arts Administration Option.

In 1990, Krug began work at MOA. Her first position at MOA was Director of Communications (1990-1998); subsequently, she occupied the roles of Manager of Research and Evaluation (1998-2001) and director of the Certificate in Museum Studies program (1997-1998). Her work at MOA involved program development and organizational change management. Major projects included creating marketing projects, conducting visitor studies, co-creation and development of the Certificate in Museum Studies program, project management for the expansion of the MOA building, developing business plans, and grant writing.

During this period, Krug was also director of studies for an interdisciplinary graduate program in critical curatorial studies in the Faculty of Arts (1998-2001). After leaving MOA in 2001, Krug joined the Faculty of Graduate Studies as Assistant Dean, Strategic Planning and Communications (2001-2006). She was instrumental in the 2007 founding of the College for Interdisciplinary Studies, of which she became Assistant Principal, Strategic Development and Administration. Krug retired form this position in 2009 to work as a consultant.

Krug completed her MBA at UBC in 1990, and in 1999 received her PhD from UBC’s Individual Interdisciplinary Studies Graduate Program. Her thesis on managing administrative change in MOA is entitled “A hypermediated ethnography of organizational change: conversations in the Museum of Anthropology.”

Skooker Broome

  • Person
  • [19-?] -

Skooker Broome received an undergraduate degree in Anthropology from the University of British Columbia (UBC). Also at UBC, he took graduate courses in Museum Studies. His other educational pursuits include the study of German and French architecture, computer sciences, lighting design, web publishing, structural drafting, and the French language.

From 1986 to 1990, Broome worked at UBC's Museum of Anthropology (MOA) as an Assistant Designer. His duties included participating in the designing, production, and installation of a number of exhibits held at the Museum, teaching design principles to the Anthropology 431 “Museum Principles and Practices” class, and producing & designing museum catalogues, brochures, invitations, and program schedules.

From 1990 to the present, Broome has been working as a Designer on a number of exhibits at the Museum of Anthropology. Broome’s tasks include designing, developing, planning, and installing museum exhibits and displays, teaching design principles to Anthropology students, and managing projects. His other duties include the management of the Museum’s building facilities and service, and he further works as a computer specialist and coordinator of computer technologies. In addition to his work at the Museum of Anthropology, Broome works as a contract designer for Third Eye Design, where he designs, develops, plans, installs, and consults on commercial projects.

James Herbert Watson

  • Person
  • 1934 -

James Herbert (Herb) Watson was born 5 December 1934 in Ontario. He studied Science at Waterloo College and Fine Arts at the Ontario College of Art, Toronto. In 1960, he spent one year at the Kokoschka International Academy of Vision in Salzburg, Austria.

During the late 1960s and early 1970s, Herb Watson worked as an exhibition designer in a number of museum environments: the Vancouver Maritime Museum and Vancouver City Museum, 1966; the Vancouver Centennial Museum, 1969; the Maritime and City Museums, 1970-1977. In 1977, he took a one year visiting appointment at the Museum Of Anthropology (hereafter MOA). In 1978, he became Exhibit Designer at MOA.

While at MOA, Herb Watson designed over sixty exhibitions, ten of which traveled across Canada and many of which involved student trainees. He regularly taught exhibit design to students in the introductory museum course (Anthropology 431) and supervised the design and installation of annual student exhibitions. He was frequently invited to give lectures and workshops at other universities and museum associations.

From 1985-90, Herb Watson managed a contract to research design and install the South Pacific Pavilion at Expo '86. His role included representing eight South Seas nations and travelling to the South Pacific to acquire artifacts. Between 1988 and 1990, Herb Watson designed the west wing extension of MOA that would house the Koerner Ceramics Collection. Herb Watson retired from MOA 28 February 28 1991.

Darrin Morrison

  • Person
  • 1965 -

Darrin Morrison was born on April 19, 1965 in Toronto, Ontario. From 1984 – 88 he attended the Ontario College of Art and Design. From 1991 – 1994 he was enrolled at the University of British Columbia (UBC), attending classes in Museum Studies, Conservation, and Chemistry. During the time Darrin Morrison was enrolled at UBC, he worked as a Museum Consultant, creating Emergency Contingency Plans for several local museums

From 1991 to 2005, he was employed at the Museum of Anthropology (MOA) at UBC. He was originally employed as a Preventive Conservation Specialist (1991-93) and moved into the position of Project Manager in the area of Preventive Conservation and Design, before his departure. Morrison’s tasks included designing museum exhibitions and displays as well as planning and implementing preventive conservation measures for the collections. He also taught and supervised students in classes such as preventive conservation, exhibition design, museum principles and methods. Besides teaching and working at MOA, Morrison also devoted time to instructing at cultural centres and small museums.

Rosa Ho

  • Person
  • 1949 - 2001

Rosa Ho was born on August 22, 1949 in Hong Kong. After moving to Canada, Ho earned a Bachelor of Arts in Art History and a Masters of Arts with a specialization in Chinese Art from the University of British Columbia. She began her museum career with a volunteer position at the Winnipeg Art Gallery. In 1975 after completing some years of service at the Winnipeg Art Gallery, she was appointed as the museum’s Assistant Curator, a position she held until 1977. After moving back to British Columbia in 1978, she was appointed as Curator at the Surrey Art Gallery. She was promoted to Director of the gallery in 1980 and continued in this position until 1987. In 1988, she left the Surrey Art Gallery to begin working for the Museum of Anthropology as the Curator of Art and Public Programmes.

As the Curator of Art and Public Programming, she was responsible for activities surrounding the planning and production of exhibitions and public programmes for contemporary art, Inuit and First Nations art, community-based public programmes, and museum education.

Throughout her career, Ho had numerous professional affiliations and served on a number of local, provincial, and national arts committees. Ho also published extensively during her career on the subject of cultural identity. Rosa Ho passed away in 2001.

Pam Brown

  • Person
  • [19-?] -

Pam Brown is currently (as of 2015) a curator in the Pacific Northwest Department of the UBC Museum of Anthropology (MOA), where she is responsible for the Heiltsuk, Wuikinuxv, Tahltan, Ktunaxa, Tsilhqot'in, and Tlingit collections. She has curated and co-curated a number of exhibits at MOA including ‘Mehodihi: Well-Known Traditions of Tahltan People’ (2003) and ‘Telling Our Stories, A Profile of Tahltan/Tlingit Artist Dempsey Bob’ (2001). She has worked closely with the Heiltsuk community on many projects and has contributed to the creation of a number of MOA sourcebooks, including ‘The Honor of One is the Honor of All’ (1996-2005) and ‘My Ancestors Are Still Dancing’ (2003).

Brown graduated with a Master of Arts degree from the University of British Columbia in 1994, having written a thesis and curated an exhibit at MOA entitled ‘Cannery Days: A Chapter In The Lives of the Heiltsuk,’ about the lives of Heiltsuk men and women in the BC fish processing industry. In 1994-1995 she was involved with the design and implementation of the Aboriginal Museum Internship Program (AMIP) and the Aboriginal Cultural Stewardship Program (ACSP) at MOA, two programs which provided native participants with practical training in how to develop low-cost, effective displays and resource materials on cultural subjects for their communities. In 1999, Brown coordinated a ‘Repatriation Forum’ which brought 180 First Nations members and museum professionals to UBC’s First Nations House of Learning to discuss the shared experiences of repatriation between First Nations in B.C. and tribes from the USA. Since 1999, Brown has also acted as supervisor of the Native Youth Programme.

Lynn Hill

  • Person
  • [19-?] -

Lynn Hill was curator-in-residence at the Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia from ca. 1998-2000, and curated the exhibit “Raven’s Reprise” (January 2000-January 2001). She is a member of the Iroquois Confederacy from the Six Nations of the Grand River and was born in Hamilton, Ontario. Hill has curated various contemporary First Nations art exhibitions, including The Traveling Alter Native Medicine Show (Vancouver, 1999), LICK (Toronto, 1997), Godi’nigoha’: The Woman’s Mind (Brantford, 1997), and AlterNative: Contemporary Photo Compositions (Toronto/Ottawa, 1995-1996). She is a founding member of the artist collective LICK and of the ALA curatorial collective.

Karen Duffek

  • Person
  • [19-?] -

Karen Duffek is a curator at the Museum of Anthropology (MOA) at the University of British Columbia (UBC). In spring of 1983, she received her Masters of Arts in Anthropology from UBC with a thesis titled The Contemporary Northwest Coast Indian Art Market. Karen Duffek’s relationship with MOA has spanned over twenty years. From 1985 through 1999, Duffek was a Guest Curator and Research Associate, during which time she worked closely with Marjorie Halpin. In 1999, she took on a role as Interim Manager in Administration at MOA. In 2000, she was hired by MOA as a Curator of Contemporary Visual Arts & the Pacific Northwest. Since 1985, Duffek has published numerous articles, essays, and anthologies addressing issues in Native Art. She has written multiple exhibition catalogues, including The Transforming Image: Painted Arts of Northwest Coast First Nations (UBC Press, 2000), which she co-authored with Bill McLennan. The Transforming Image won the Canadian Museum Association’s 2001 Award for Outstanding Achievement in Publications, and the British Columbia Historical Federation’s Certificate of Merit for Historical Writing in 2000. In 2005, Karen Duffek co-edited the anthology, Bill Reid and Beyond: Expanding on Modern Native Art (Douglas & McIntyre, 2004).

As the Curator of Contemporary Visual Arts & the Pacific Northwest, Karen Duffek has curated some major exhibitions at MOA, including Border Zones: New Art across Cultures (2010), and Robert Davidson: The Abstract Edge (2004).

Inge Ruus

  • Person

Ingeborg (Inge) Ruus worked as a Curatorial Assistant at the Museum of Anthropology (MOA) at the University of British Columbia (UBC). She received a Bachelor of Arts degree from the UBC in 1975. Prior to completing her studies Ruus worked at MOA as a volunteer in the position of Registrar from 1948-1977. While completing her studies she became involved in an unofficial capacity with the MOA. In 1976 she was instrumental in mounting the Guatemala Highlands exhibit which focused on textiles from that region. In 1977 Ruus was hired by MOA as a Curatorial Assistant specializing in Ethnology. However, due to illness Ruus’s official tenure at MOA was short lived, and she left the museum in the latter part of 1977.

Audrey Patricia Mackay Shane

  • Person
  • 1922 -

Audrey Patricia MacKay Shane was born on August 27, 1922 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. She received a diploma in Interior Design from the University of Manitoba in 1942 and worked for the Department of Architecture and Fine Arts at the University for the next three years. In the period between 1962 and 1970, she served in voluntary roles such as secretary of the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra and treasurer of the Manitoba Archaeological Society. In 1974, Shane received her Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology from the University of British Columbia (UBC). A year later, she was hired as Archivist/Librarian at the Museum of Anthropology, a position she held until she was appointed Curator of Documentation in 1979. As Archivist/Librarian, Shane was responsible for the documentation of the Museum’s collections for inclusion in the National Inventory of Canada as well as for the cataloguing of the collections.

Shane completed her M.A. in Anthropology in UBC in 1978. Her primary interest was in the art and material culture of the northern Northwest Coast, China, Japan and the Insular Pacific before the 20th century. As the Curator of Documentation, Shane’s responsibilities included ensuring the accurate permanent catalogue records were created and maintained for the Museum’s collections, interpreting the Museum’s collections to the public and students through exhibits, publications, university and community teaching, and representing the museum on a local and international level. She taught a series of laboratory sessions in Anthropology 431, Museum Principles and Methods, a course offered by UBC’s Department of Anthropology and also conducted lectures and seminars for the Museum’s volunteers. Shane has written various scholarly articles and presented many papers in numerous conferences. Her published articles include “Sensibilities: Unsuspected Multicultural Harmonies” which appeared in the March/April 1983 issue of Canadian Collector, “Power in Their Hands: the Gitsontk,” which was published in The Tsimshian: Images of the Past Views for the Present and “Networking: the Canadian Experience,” a paper published for the Western Museum Conference in 1983. Shane has also curated a number of exhibitions and served on the Acquisitions and Collections Committees within the Museum. In addition, she was active in committees formed by professional associations such as the British Columbia Museum Association Committee on Legal and Ethical Questions. She also assumed the role of Signing Expert Examiner in Ethnography for the Canadian Cultural Property Export and Import Board. Shane retired from her position at the Museum in 1987.

Thomas Crosby

  • Person
  • June 21, 1840 - January 13, 1914

Rev. Thomas Crosby, son of Thomas Crosby and Mary Ward, was born in Pickering, Yorkshire, England on June 21, 1840. In 1856, Crosby migrated to Canada with his parents, settling near Woodstock, Upper Canada. In 1858 he joined the Wesleyan Methodist Church and became a preacher. In 1861, Crosby was working as a tanner in Woodstock when he read a call in the Methodist Christian Guardian (Toronto) for missionaries to work on the west coast. He left his job and paid his own way to Vancouver Island, arriving in Victoria in 1862.

In 1863, Crosby worked as an assistant to Cornelius Bryant at a Methodist mission in Nanaimo. In Nanaimo, Crosby met his first protégé Santana (later renamed to David Sallosalton) who joined Crosby in his efforts. Crosby and David lived and worked together. David was well known for his “Steamboat Whistle Sermon” but passed away in 1873 at the age of 19 from tuberculosis. In 1869, he was moved to the missions on the lower mainland, where Chilliwack was his home base. His success was rewarded in 1871 with ordination to the ministry in the Wesleyan Methodist Church in Canada. In the winter of 1873–74, Rev. Crosby toured Ontario to raise funds for missions and to search for a wife.

Emma Jane Douse, daughter of John Douse and Eliza Milner, was born on April 14, 1849 in Cobourg, Ontario. Her father, John Douse, had emigrated from England in the early 1830s to convert the Six Nations, and by Emma's birth in 1849 was a highly respected Methodist minister in Ontario. Emma trained at Hamilton's Wesleyan Female College, an institution offering higher learning for women in literature and classics. After completing her education, Emma became a teacher at Wesleyan Female College. In late January 1874, Rev. Crosby spoke at Emma’s College about supporting the missionary effort. Short weeks after meeting Rev. Crosby, she wrote home to her mother and expressed her desire to travel with him to British Columbia. Rev. Crosby and Emma married on April 30, 1874 in Cobourg, Ontario.

Following their marriage, Rev. Crosby and Emma traveled to Fort Simpson (from 1880, known as Port Simpson) near present day Prince Rupert at the invitation of the Tsimshian people. For the next quarter of a century they lived among the Tsimshian people, whose territory stretches between the Nass and Skeena rivers. Rev. Crosby and Emma set up schools and boarding homes for the Tsimshian children. Rev. Crosby and other missionaries encouraged single-family homes over multi-family homes and patriarchal succession over matrilineal family concepts. In 1880, a village council was established to replace native forms of government and Rev. Crosby acted as head of the council. In 1876, a large frame church was completed to symbolize Rev. Crosby’s efforts. During his tenure there were major revivals, each lasting several months, in 1874–75, 1877, 1881–82, and 1892–93.

In addition to his work at Port Simpson, Rev. Crosby established an itinerancy system along the coast from Bella Bella in the south to villages along the Nass and Skeena rivers in the north. It frequently required up to 1,000 miles of travel per year and was initially served by canoe. In November 1884, the mission acquired a ship, the Glad Tidings.

Rev. Crosby and Emma had seven daughters (Jessie, Grace, Ida Mary, Gertrude Louise, and three others) and one son (Thomas Harold). The mortality rate among the Tsimshian was high, and four of his daughters died at Port Simpson, three of them from diphtheria in 1885 and 1886; Emma was also in poor health.

In 1894, Rev. Crosby was appointed superintendent of Indian missions in British Columbia for the Methodist Church. Rev. Crosby and his family left Port Simpson in 1897 for Victoria, where he also assumed the chairmanship of the British Columbia Conference. His health was beginning to decline, and he suffered especially from a growing problem with asthma. From 1899 to 1907 he ran the missions at Sardis and Chilliwack; he then retired to Vancouver. Rev. Crosby became well known for this missionary work. He was superannuated in 1907 and moved to New Westminster. In failing health, he moved to Vancouver and passed away January 13, 1914; his wife Emma, passed away on August 11, 1926 in Sidney British Columbia.

Thomas Crosby is the author of David Sallosalton ([1906?]), Among the An-ko-me-nums, or Flathead tribes of Indians of the Pacific coast (1907), and Up and down the North Pacific coast by canoe and mission ship ([1914]), all published in Toronto.

Joan D. Witney

  • Person
  • [19-?]

Dr. Joan D. Witney (also known as Dr. Joan Witney-Moore) was one of the three founding doctors of the first Community Health Clinic opened under the Saskatchewan Medical Care Insurance Act (1962). Witney had originally trained as a nurse, graduating in the first year that nurses were granted a Bachelor of Nursing degree. After the Second World War, she worked at Norway House and Moosonee. Witney-Moore trained as a doctor and interned at the Charles Camsell Hospital in Edmonton during the 1950s.
In early July 1962, Drs. Joan Witney, Margaret Mahood, and Sam Wolfe helped the Community Health Services Association open Saskatchewan’s first Community Health Clinic. Witney provided medical care during the twenty-three-day strike by most of the province’s doctors, but left the clinic at the end of the strike later in July.

Stanley E. Read

  • Person
  • February 7, 1900 - April 8, 1997

Stanley E. Read was born on February 7, 1900, in Rock Island, Quebec. He earned the degrees of Bachelor of Arts in 1923 and Master of Arts in 1925 from McGill University in Montreal, Quebec. After going to France on a scholarship from 1925 to 1927 and a brief employment at Bishop’s College in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Read moved to Chicago, Illinois in 1928 to work as an English Professor at DePaul University. While in Chicago, he met his wife, Ruth Read, whom he married in 1940. In 1946, Read moved to Vancouver and joined the Department of English at the University of British Columbia. He continued to teach in the department until his retirement in 1971. Read passed away in Vancouver on April 8, 1997 at the age of 97.

Read’s lasting contributions to the University of British Columbia are numerous. In 1953, Read was one of the eight U.B.C. professors who, along with writer Roderick Haig-Brown, started a foundation at U.B.C. with a small sum of money accumulated from “various bets and fines for illegal or non-ethical fishing methods” during a group fishing holiday at Upper Campbell Lake. The foundation, playfully called “The Harry Hawthorn Foundation for the Inculcation and Propagation of the Principles and Ethics of Fly-Fishing,” used its proceeds to purchase books on angling and game fishing for the U.B.C. Library, and over time produced what is now known as the Harry Hawthorn Foundation Collection. For 34 years, Read was the Secretary of the foundation and organized their annual fishing trips. Read was also instrumental in the organization of U.B.C.’s International House, and played a formative role in the creation of the University of British Columbia quarterly of English criticism and review, Canadian Literature.

Read wrote a number of articles, books, bibliographies, and book reviews about his academic interests and his hobby of fishing. Publications by Read include A Bibliography of Hogarth Books and Studies, 1900-1940 (DePaul University, 1941); Documents of Eighteenth Century Taste (DePaul University, 1942); What Manner of Man Was He? Andrew Carnegie and Libraries in British Columbia (University of British Columbia, 1960); More Recreation for the Contemplative Man: A Supplemental Bibliography of Books on Angling and Game Fish in the University of British Columbia (compiled with Laurenda Daniells. Library of the University of British Columbia, 1971); and A Place Called Pennask: A Capsule History of the Pennask Lake Company, Limited and the Pennask Lake Fishing and Game Club (Mitchell Press, 1977).

Read was also a hobbyist photographer and took many photos during his fishing trips and vacations with his wife, Ruth. Some of his photographs were featured in British Columbia: A Centennial Anthology (McLelland and Stewart, 1958), and one of his photographs was used for the cover of the book A Small and Charming World (Creekstone Press, 2001).

James Albert Gibson

  • Person
  • May 7, 1938 - February 23, 2009

James “Jim” Albert Gibson was born on May 7, 1938 in Indiana. He studied anthropology at Indiana University, receiving a BA in 1960. In 1964, he graduated from the University of Washington with a Master of Arts degree in Linguistics, and in 1973 he received a Ph.D. in Linguistics from the University of Hawaii, Hilo. Beginning in 1969, Gibson taught Anthropology and Linguistics at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, retiring in 1996 as Associate Professor Emeritus. He died on February 23, 2009, in Flagstaff, Arizona.

Lillian French

  • Person
  • [19-?]

Lillian French, neé Lucey, worked as a nurse and teacher in various communities in British Columbia, the Yukon and the Northwest Territories from the late 1930s to the 1960s, including Port Simpson, Old Crow, YT and Fort MacPherson, NWT. She was also a member of the Anglican Church Women’s Auxiliary. During her career, she collected many examples of Native handicrafts, many of which she received as gifts from her pupils and patients.

John Mennie

  • Person
  • [18-?]-[19-?]

John Mennie was a radio operator in Alert Bay for Bull Harbor, Alert Bay Wireless and Alert Bay Radio between 1930 and 1937.

Wilson Duff

  • Person
  • March 23, 1925 - August 8, 1976

Wilson Duff was born on March 23, 1925. After serving in the Royal Canadian Air Force as a navigator, Duff attended the University of British Columbia and graduated with a B.A. in 1949. Two years later, in 1951, he completed his M.A. in Anthropology from the University of Washington. Duff’s professional research concentrated primarily on the native cultures of the Northwest Coast and he was instrumental in the development of scholarship in this area. His influence on the study and appreciation of Northwest Coast art was also very profound as he inspired artistic work and in some ways was an artist himself, as evidenced by his poetry and the poetic nature of some of his writing.

In 1950, (prior to being awarded his M.A.) Duff was appointed Curator of Anthropology for the British Columbia Provincial Museum, a position he would hold until 1965. From 1960-1965 he directed the British Columbia Government Anthropology Program. In 1965 Duff left the Museum to become a professor of Anthropology in the Department of Anthropology and Sociology at the University of British Columbia. Throughout his career, Duff maintained a close association with museums and galleries, helping to plan buildings and exhibits, and he was involved in the early stages of planning of the new Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia. Two major exhibits by Duff include “Arts of the Raven” shown at the Vancouver Art Gallery (1967) and “Images Stone B.C.” (1975) shown locally in Vancouver and Victoria before travelling to art galleries across Canada.

Duff was active on a number of committees and he was a founding member of the British Columbia Museums Association where he served as Vice-president from 1962-1963 and as President from 1963-1965. Duff also served on the joint British Columbia Provincial Museum and University of British Columbia Totem Pole Preservation Committee that purchased and salvaged some of the last remaining poles in the Queen Charlotte Islands in the 1950’s. In addition, he chaired the provincial government's Archaeological Sites Advisory Board from 1960-1966 and served on the provincial government's Indian Advisory Committee. During this time he led support for legislation to protect British Columbia’s archaeological remains and worked on the draft of British Columbia’s first “Archaeological and Historic Sites Protection Act” that was passed in 1960. In 1960 Duff acted as a consultant for the Kitwancool tribe and served as an expert witness in the Nishga land case before the B.C. Supreme Court in 1969. That same year, on behalf of the Alaska State Museum and the Smithsonian Institution, he surveyed the totem poles of southwest Alaska. Two years later, in 1971, Duff directed a project to record the history of southeast Alaska Indians for the Alaska State Museum.

Throughout his academic career, Wilson Duff wrote a number of articles, manuscripts and books. From 1950-1956 he was the editor of Anthropology in British Columbia and his first publication in 1953 was based on his Master’s Thesis on the Upper Sto:lo Indians. Published articles and book reviews by Duff can be found in Anthropology in British Columbia no.1, 2, 3, 4, 5; The Crowsnest 9(3); Victoria Naturalist vols. 7, 8, 16(7); B.C. Historical Quarterly, July-October 1951; American Anthropologist vol.54, no.4; Canadian Art 11(2); Anthropology in British Columbia Memoir no.4; Western Museums Quarterly 1(3); Museum Round-up no.12, 16; Anthropologica vol. 6, no.1; B.C. Studies no.3, 19; and Northwest Anthropological Research Notes 3(2). Although many of Duff’s manuscripts remain unpublished, a number of his books are considered to be foremost reference sources in their field. Such publications by Duff include: Thunderbird Park, Victoria B.C., (Government Travel Bureau, 1952), Selected List of Publications Pertaining to the Indians of British Columbia (with J.E.M. Kew, 1956); British Columbia Atlas of Resources (maps 12, 13a, 13b, 1956); Anthony Island, a Home of the Haidas (1957); Histories, territories and laws of the Kitwancool (1959); The Killer Whale Copper (A Chief’s Memorial to His Son (1960); Preserving British Columbia’s Prehistory. Archaeological Sites Advisory Board (1961); Indian History of British Columbia: The Impact of the White Man (1965); Thoughts on the Nootka Canoe (1965); Arts of the Raven: Masterworks by the Northwest Coast Indians (1967); Indians before the arrival of the white men, the Indians after the arrival of the white men (1967); Indians of British Columbia: Selected Bibliography (1968); Totem Pole Survey of Southeastern Alaska (1969); Bibliography of Anthropology of B.C. (1973); and Images Stone B.C. Thirty Centuries of Northwest Coast Indian sculpture (1975). In 1996, Bird of paradox: the unpublished writings of Wilson Duff was published.

Wilson Duff died August 8, 1976 leaving behind his wife, Marion and his two children, Marnie and Tom. In 1981, “The World is as Sharp as a Knife: An Anthology in Honor of Wilson Duff” was published by the British Columbia Provincial Museum and contained essays, reminisces, artwork, and poetry celebrating Duff’s accomplishments, research and friendships.

Wollaston, F.E.R

  • Person
  • [ca.18-?] - 1953

According to his obituary (from the Vernon News, February 19 1953), Francis Edward Richmond Wollasten was an English immigrant who arrived in the Okanagan in the 1890’s. He started work at the Coldstream Ranch in Vernon, B.C. in 1914, and held the position of manager of the Ranch from 1918 until 1939. He passed away in Victoria B.C. in 1953.

Deirdre Lott

  • Person
  • [19--] -

Biographical information not available.

Beverley Brown

  • 17
  • Person
  • 1930 - [ca. 200-]

Eva Beverley Brown (nee. Mason) was born March 11, 1930 in Bella Bella, B.C. For seven and a half years beginning in 1937 or 1938, she was a student at the St. Michael’s Residential School in Alert Bay. After leaving St. Michael’s in 1944 or 1945, Beverley attended Langley High School. In 1949, she married Wallace Percy Brown, another former student at St. Michael’s. They lived in Bella Bella until 1960, when they moved to Vancouver.

Results 101 to 120 of 193