Mostrando 310 resultados

authority records

Lillian French

  • Persona
  • [19-?]

Lillian French, neé Lucey, worked as a nurse and teacher in various communities in British Columbia, the Yukon and the Northwest Territories from the late 1930s to the 1960s, including Port Simpson, Old Crow, YT and Fort MacPherson, NWT. She was also a member of the Anglican Church Women’s Auxiliary. During her career, she collected many examples of Native handicrafts, many of which she received as gifts from her pupils and patients.

James Albert Gibson

  • Persona
  • May 7, 1938 - February 23, 2009

James “Jim” Albert Gibson was born on May 7, 1938 in Indiana. He studied anthropology at Indiana University, receiving a BA in 1960. In 1964, he graduated from the University of Washington with a Master of Arts degree in Linguistics, and in 1973 he received a Ph.D. in Linguistics from the University of Hawaii, Hilo. Beginning in 1969, Gibson taught Anthropology and Linguistics at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, retiring in 1996 as Associate Professor Emeritus. He died on February 23, 2009, in Flagstaff, Arizona.

Virginia Kehoe

  • November 2, 1916 - September 15, 2008

Virginia Catherine Kehoe was born in the Kitsilano neighbourhood of Vancouver on November 2, 1916. Upon marrying Bruce Kehoe, Virginia travelled with him to Ottawa, Calgary, Toronto and France as his career in the Royal Canadian Air Force lent itself to a significant amount of travel. Virginia Kehoe trained as an artist, and became close friends with Kwakwaka’wakw artist and carver Douglas Cranmer. She assisted in taking care of Cranmer’s store The Talking Stick on South Granville in Vancouver for part of its existence. Kehoe and her husband moved to Vancouver Island after Bruce Kehoe retired from the RCAF, first settling in Sooke and then moving to Victoria. Towards the end of her life, after the passing of her husband Bruce, Virginia Kehoe moved to Riverwest in Ladner, B.C. to be closer to family. Virginia Kehoe died in Ladner on September 15, 2008.

Stanley E. Read

  • Persona
  • February 7, 1900 - April 8, 1997

Stanley E. Read was born on February 7, 1900, in Rock Island, Quebec. He earned the degrees of Bachelor of Arts in 1923 and Master of Arts in 1925 from McGill University in Montreal, Quebec. After going to France on a scholarship from 1925 to 1927 and a brief employment at Bishop’s College in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Read moved to Chicago, Illinois in 1928 to work as an English Professor at DePaul University. While in Chicago, he met his wife, Ruth Read, whom he married in 1940. In 1946, Read moved to Vancouver and joined the Department of English at the University of British Columbia. He continued to teach in the department until his retirement in 1971. Read passed away in Vancouver on April 8, 1997 at the age of 97.

Read’s lasting contributions to the University of British Columbia are numerous. In 1953, Read was one of the eight U.B.C. professors who, along with writer Roderick Haig-Brown, started a foundation at U.B.C. with a small sum of money accumulated from “various bets and fines for illegal or non-ethical fishing methods” during a group fishing holiday at Upper Campbell Lake. The foundation, playfully called “The Harry Hawthorn Foundation for the Inculcation and Propagation of the Principles and Ethics of Fly-Fishing,” used its proceeds to purchase books on angling and game fishing for the U.B.C. Library, and over time produced what is now known as the Harry Hawthorn Foundation Collection. For 34 years, Read was the Secretary of the foundation and organized their annual fishing trips. Read was also instrumental in the organization of U.B.C.’s International House, and played a formative role in the creation of the University of British Columbia quarterly of English criticism and review, Canadian Literature.

Read wrote a number of articles, books, bibliographies, and book reviews about his academic interests and his hobby of fishing. Publications by Read include A Bibliography of Hogarth Books and Studies, 1900-1940 (DePaul University, 1941); Documents of Eighteenth Century Taste (DePaul University, 1942); What Manner of Man Was He? Andrew Carnegie and Libraries in British Columbia (University of British Columbia, 1960); More Recreation for the Contemplative Man: A Supplemental Bibliography of Books on Angling and Game Fish in the University of British Columbia (compiled with Laurenda Daniells. Library of the University of British Columbia, 1971); and A Place Called Pennask: A Capsule History of the Pennask Lake Company, Limited and the Pennask Lake Fishing and Game Club (Mitchell Press, 1977).

Read was also a hobbyist photographer and took many photos during his fishing trips and vacations with his wife, Ruth. Some of his photographs were featured in British Columbia: A Centennial Anthology (McLelland and Stewart, 1958), and one of his photographs was used for the cover of the book A Small and Charming World (Creekstone Press, 2001).

Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC)

  • Entidade coletiva
  • 1989 -

The Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation is the result of a call by Australian Prime Minister Bob Hawke in January 1989 for Asian-Pacific economies to consult on how they could effectively cooperate and increase trade and investment flows in the Asia-Pacific. Australia’s motive was to create an Asia-Pacific economic identity, of which it would be an integral part. Japan endorsed the Australian proposal and became the second driving force in the creation of APEC. The first APEC meeting of trade and foreign ministers took place in Canberra in November of 1989 (with twelve attendees: Australia, Brunei, Canada, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and the U.S.).
A summit or Leaders’ Meeting has become an annual event since President Clinton invited leaders to Blake Island in 1993. The first APEC Leaders’ Meeting was held in Seattle in November 1993. This first Leaders’ Meeting of economies represented half the world’s population and 56% of its GNP. A year later all APEC leaders met at Bogor, Indonesia, and at that meeting the Leaders resolved to move to free trade and investment by 2010 for industrialized member economies, and by 2020 for developing member economies. The 1995 meetings were in Osaka, Japan where the Osaka Action Agenda was agreed to, setting out a template for future APEC work towards common goals. The Philippines convened the APEC Leaders’ Meeting in 1996 at Subic Bay. The Leaders’ Meeting was held in Vancouver, Canada in 1997 at the Museum of Anthropology on the University of British Columbia campus.
The following countries are members of APEC as of 1999: Australia, Brunei, Darussalam, Canada, Chile, China, Hong Kong SAR, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Philippines, Russia, Singapore, Chinese Taipei, Thailand, United States, and Vietnam.
APEC has two standing committees, 10 working groups, and a few other forums that report to the Senior Officials Meeting. The two committees are the Committee for Trade and Investment (CTI) and the Economic Committee (EC). The CTI deals with trade and investment liberalization and business facilitation concerns. The role of the EC continues to evolve. It is primarily responsible for providing the Senior Officials Meeting with information and analysis on broad, crosscutting issues which are not easily handled by one of the working groups.
The ten working groups are: Trade and Investment Data, Trade Promotion, Investment and Industrial Science and Technology, Human Resource Development, Energy, Marine Resource Conservation, Telecommunications, Fisheries, Transportation, and Tourism.

Carol Mayer

  • Persona
  • [19-?] -

Carol Elizabeth Mayer is a curator at the Museum of Anthropology (UBC). She is a Canadian citizen. Her educational background includes a Diploma in Arts & Sciences (honours) from Vancouver City College in 1972. In 1974 Carol completed a Bachelor of Arts (honours), majoring in Anthropology, at the University of British Columbia. In 1976 she received a Certificate in Social Anthropology from Cambridge University in Cambridge, UK and in 1996 she received a Ph.D. from the University of Leicester, UK in Museum Studies.

Carol began working at the University of British Columbia Museum of Anthropology (MOA) in 1987 as Curator of Collections and held that position until 1990 when she was appointed the Curator of Ethnology/Ceramics, a position she held until 2005. In 2005 she was appointed Curator of Africa/Pacific, and Curatorial Department Head. As of 2016, she is Curator of Oceania & Africa. In 1993 Carol also became an Instructor in the Department of Anthropology and Sociology. She was the co-founder and the Director of the Museum Studies Certificate Programme for MOA and the Department of Continuing Studies in 1996 and 1997. She has participated in several committees at MOA such as the Acquisition Committee, Collections Committee, Research & Teaching Committee, Executive Committee, and the Renewal Project Team. As Head Curator she is responsible for researching her area of specialty, publishing and presenting papers, representing the Curatorial Department on committees, constructing and overseeing departmental budgets, developing exhibitions and collections, and developing acquisitions policies.

Outside of UBC Carol is an instructor at the University of Victoria in the Faculty of History of Art (1989 to present), and at Emily Carr College of Art and Design in the Visual Arts Department and Art History Department (1993 to present). Previous to MOA Carol worked at The Vancouver Museum where she held several positions from 1975 until 1987.

Carol Mayer has published internationally on curatorship, exhibition, design and ceramics. She is active in provincial, national and international museum associations and has served on boards at all these levels. She has chaired and organized BC Museums Association Conferences as in the year 2000 where she was on the Planning Committee. The Canadian Museums Association awarded her in 1984 with the National Award of Merit for Curatorship and in 1991 with the National Award for Outstanding Achievement. In 2009 she received the International Council of Museums Canada International Achievement award. Many of her exhibition projects have involved collaborative work with communities and their artists, whether they be local or far afield.

Pam Brown

  • Persona
  • [19-?] -

Pam Brown is currently (as of 2015) a curator in the Pacific Northwest Department of the UBC Museum of Anthropology (MOA), where she is responsible for the Heiltsuk, Wuikinuxv, Tahltan, Ktunaxa, Tsilhqot'in, and Tlingit collections. She has curated and co-curated a number of exhibits at MOA including ‘Mehodihi: Well-Known Traditions of Tahltan People’ (2003) and ‘Telling Our Stories, A Profile of Tahltan/Tlingit Artist Dempsey Bob’ (2001). She has worked closely with the Heiltsuk community on many projects and has contributed to the creation of a number of MOA sourcebooks, including ‘The Honor of One is the Honor of All’ (1996-2005) and ‘My Ancestors Are Still Dancing’ (2003).

Brown graduated with a Master of Arts degree from the University of British Columbia in 1994, having written a thesis and curated an exhibit at MOA entitled ‘Cannery Days: A Chapter In The Lives of the Heiltsuk,’ about the lives of Heiltsuk men and women in the BC fish processing industry. In 1994-1995 she was involved with the design and implementation of the Aboriginal Museum Internship Program (AMIP) and the Aboriginal Cultural Stewardship Program (ACSP) at MOA, two programs which provided native participants with practical training in how to develop low-cost, effective displays and resource materials on cultural subjects for their communities. In 1999, Brown coordinated a ‘Repatriation Forum’ which brought 180 First Nations members and museum professionals to UBC’s First Nations House of Learning to discuss the shared experiences of repatriation between First Nations in B.C. and tribes from the USA. Since 1999, Brown has also acted as supervisor of the Native Youth Programme.

Rosa Ho

  • Persona
  • 1949 - 2001

Rosa Ho was born on August 22, 1949 in Hong Kong. After moving to Canada, Ho earned a Bachelor of Arts in Art History and a Masters of Arts with a specialization in Chinese Art from the University of British Columbia. She began her museum career with a volunteer position at the Winnipeg Art Gallery. In 1975 after completing some years of service at the Winnipeg Art Gallery, she was appointed as the museum’s Assistant Curator, a position she held until 1977. After moving back to British Columbia in 1978, she was appointed as Curator at the Surrey Art Gallery. She was promoted to Director of the gallery in 1980 and continued in this position until 1987. In 1988, she left the Surrey Art Gallery to begin working for the Museum of Anthropology as the Curator of Art and Public Programmes.

As the Curator of Art and Public Programming, she was responsible for activities surrounding the planning and production of exhibitions and public programmes for contemporary art, Inuit and First Nations art, community-based public programmes, and museum education.

Throughout her career, Ho had numerous professional affiliations and served on a number of local, provincial, and national arts committees. Ho also published extensively during her career on the subject of cultural identity. Rosa Ho passed away in 2001.

Director of the Museum of Anthropology

  • Persona
  • 1947 -

The Director of the Museum of Anthropology (MOA) is directly responsible for the general administration of the museum. Responsibilities carried out by the director include, but are not limited to: directing the development of museum policy, ensuring that the museum’s mandate is met and carried out, overseeing budgets and funding, maintaining correspondence with potential donors and managing staff. The Director also administers facilities and building maintenance and is responsible for overseeing exhibits and special programming hosted by the museum. As a part of the University of British Columbia (UBC), the director reports to the Dean of Arts.

MOA opened in 1947 and Dr. Harry Hawthorn, a professor of Anthropology, was appointed the first director in that year. He remained in this position until his retirement in 1974, when Michael Ames became the second director. Ames was director until he retired in 1997, when Ruth Phillips became director. She left the position in 2002, at which point Ames returned to MOA as Acting Director until Anthony Shelton was appointed as director in 2004.

Moya Waters

  • Persona

Associate Director of Museum of Anthropology

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