Showing 309 results

authority records

Fuyubi Nakamura

Curator, Asia, Museum of Anthropology
Associate Member, Department of Asian Studies

Anna Pappalardo

  • Person

Assistant Director and Department Head (Administration & Outreach), Museum of Anthropology

Moya Waters

  • Person

Associate Director of Museum of Anthropology

President’s Planning and Coordinating Committee

  • Corporate body
  • [1971 - 1976]

The purpose of this committee, as with all other UBC Planning Coordinating Committees, was to consider all of the interests involved in the development of the new building for the Museum of Anthropology. The Committee was formed to ensure that balanced recommendations, taking into account the overall interests of the University, could be made to the President. Committee members participated in defining terms of construction, operation, and maintenance of the museum, including choosing the architect, deciding location, and securing funds for the continuing operation of the building.

The development and construction of the museum was, in part, made possible by a federal grant, Canada’s 1971 Centennial Gift to the people of British Columbia. The University’s Senate Committee on Academic Building Needs recognized the need for a new museum, linked to the department of Anthropology and Sociology. In 1971 the President’s Planning and Coordinating Committee was formed by then University President Walter Gage to assist in the planning and construction of the Museum of Man building (now known as the Museum of Anthropology, changed in March 1973), and the new facility in the Department of Anthropology and Sociology.

Dean of Arts, Douglas T. Kenny, chaired this committee. Other members included Dr. Michael Ames, Mrs. Audrey Hawthorn, and Dr. Harry Hawthorn, among others (Wilson Duff, Marjorie Halpin, Ingeborg Ruus, Audrey Shane, Gloria Webster.)

David Cunningham

  • Person

David Dunnett Cunningham held the position of Projects Manager -Design, Exhibitions, and Facility Planning at the University of British Columbia’s Museum of Anthropology (MOA) since 1988. In 2006 he was made Renewal Building Lead. In 2009 he was designated Manager, Design/Production/Renewal Building Lead. In 2010, Cunningham returned to his design role. His education includes undergraduate studies in Engineering and Geography, and graduate studies in Industrial Design at the University of Calgary, as well as technical training in cabinet making and photography.

Cunningham was responsible for managing all aspects of exhibition production at the Museum of Anthropology. This included the conceptualization and implementation of two and three-dimensional exhibits, long-term collection installations, signage, and other visual presentations. He directed and guided the design, production and installation of exhibits; provided cost estimates and production budgets; and prepared drawings, specifications and tender documents for exhibit installations, furniture, and modifications. Cunningham’s responsibilities also included the overall management of the museum as a member of the Executive Ways and Means Committee, Teaching and Curriculum Committee, Renewal Team, Building Team, and Research Centre Working Group; and facility-planning management, through liaison with the architect and the university for gallery and building renovation, and expansion plans. In this latter capacity, he was involved with renovations and modifications to Galleries 5 and 10, the Theatre, the Ethnology Lab, and the MOA renewal project.

He also taught exhibit design and museum architecture to undergraduate and graduate students in UBC’s Department of Anthropology. Course instruction included Anthropology 431 and 432. Working with the Museum’s collections and existing exhibits, course assignments included design and installation of small displays in node and other cases in Museum’s galleries.

Cunningham has been involved with the production of many exhibits, including A Rare Flower: A Century of Cantonese Opera in Canada (1993-95), which also travelled to Victoria, Kelowna, Calgary, Edmonton, Manitoba, and Montreal, The Abstract Edge: Recent Works by Robert Davidson (2004-2005), and Mehodihi: Well-Known Traditions of Tahltan People (2003-2005), among others. He has received awards from the Canadian Museums Association (CMA) relating to his work at the Museum, for Facility and Exhibition Design (1999), and for Outstanding Achievement in the Museum Management Category (1997). He has also published articles relating to his work.

Cunningham retired form the museum in 2015.

University of British Columbia. Museum of Anthropology. Public Relations and Communications Office

  • Corporate body
  • 1982 - 1990

From 1978 to 1981, the functions of the Public Relations and Communications Office, including public programming and public relations activities, were fulfilled by the museum’s Extension Curator.

In 1982, Ruth Anderson was appointed Public Relations Coordinator. In 1985, the position was re-titled Public Relations Officer. In January 1986, Christopher Miller took over the position of Public Relations Officer. In 1987, the position’s title was changed to Public Relations and Development Officer, and was changed again in March 1990 to Public Relations and Marketing Officer.

In October, 1990, the functions of the Public Relations Office were assumed by the newly created Communications Office, headed by Kersti Krug, Director of Communications. From 1994 to 1998, Anna Pappalardo held this position and in 1998 Jennifer Webb took over. During Webb's time the Public and Community Services Department was created, and in 2006 the position was renamed Communications Manager. Webb held this position until 2013. This management position has often been supported by one or more assistants.

The Public Relations and Communications Office was established to increase the public’s awareness of the Museum of Anthropology and to promote its programs and special events. Functioning as an intermediary between the museum and the public, the Office is responsible for developing the public image of the museum. To achieve these functions, the Communications Manager is responsible for developing and maintaining media contacts, holding press conferences, writing press releases, advertising and producing publications about the museum, its programs, events, and services, building relationships with tour guides and hotel operators, and developing techniques for increasing museum attendance. In addition, the Manager is also responsible for coordinating fundraising and promotional events, conducting VIP visits, and representing the museum on various committees and at community events. Historically, this position has also been responsible for administering the museum’s Print Out Art Loan program and acting as a liaison for the Gallery Guides program.

Roland Reed

  • Person
  • June 22, 1864 – December 14, 1934

Roland W. Reed was an American artist and photographer. Born in Wisconsin, he held a variety of jobs that took him throughout the western United States - including work on railways, sawmills, and as an Associated Press photographer. It was not until the age of 43 that he devoted his time to photographing Native Americans in the western United States. This is the work that he is best known. It is typically described as being pictorialist in nature.

Nuno Porto

  • Person
  • [19-?] -

Nuno Porto is originally from Portugal. He was trained has a social anthropologist. He did long term fieldwork in Central Portugal in the early 1990s, studying the relationships between literacy skills acquisition and gendered cultural knowledges. The coexistence of literate and oral rationalities in rural Portugal fuelled interests in visual culture and on how religious experience is mediated by visual and material culture. The universe of visual theory and material culture studies was to become the center of his subsequent work related to museums. His PhD dissertation explored the articulation of colonialism, science, and museum culture, and how these merged in the co-development of the Dundo Museum in Northeast of Angola and of its proprietor, the Diamonds Company of Angola. This dissertation received the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation award for the Social and Human Sciences Thesis and was published by the same foundation in 2009.

Between 2006 and 2012 he integrated the Commission for the Re-opening of the Dundo Museum, led by the Ministry of Culture of Angola that successfully concluded its works in 2012. During this period he also led a team that developed and implemented the website on the archival materials of the Diamonds Company of Angola held at the University of Coimbra, www.diamangdigital.net. He was also a member of the research team for the project ‘Bearing Waters’ led by Lisbon sculptor Virginia Fróis, on the renewal of traditional Cape Verdean women ceramics.

Between 1991 and 2011 he taught at the University of Coimbra, Portugal, on subjects related to theory in social anthropology, material culture, critical museology, visual culture, photography and African studies. His work has been published in four different languages in eight different countries. He coordinated the Graduate Program in Social and Cultural Anthropology between 2006 and 2011, and also taught in the Graduate Program on Design and Multimedia. He acted as director of the Museum of Anthropology at the University of Coimbra between 2002 and 2006, where his team developed a series of temporary exhibitions based on the notion of ethnographic installation.

In 2013 he was Invited Professor at the Post Graduate Program in Social Memory at the Federal University of the State of Rio de Janeiro - UNIRIO, in Brazil.

Porto currently serves as curator for Africa and Latin America at the University of British Columbia Museum of Anthropology.

Carol Mayer

  • Person
  • [19-?] -

Carol Elizabeth Mayer is a curator at the Museum of Anthropology (UBC). She is a Canadian citizen. Her educational background includes a Diploma in Arts & Sciences (honours) from Vancouver City College in 1972. In 1974 Carol completed a Bachelor of Arts (honours), majoring in Anthropology, at the University of British Columbia. In 1976 she received a Certificate in Social Anthropology from Cambridge University in Cambridge, UK and in 1996 she received a Ph.D. from the University of Leicester, UK in Museum Studies.

Carol began working at the University of British Columbia Museum of Anthropology (MOA) in 1987 as Curator of Collections and held that position until 1990 when she was appointed the Curator of Ethnology/Ceramics, a position she held until 2005. In 2005 she was appointed Curator of Africa/Pacific, and Curatorial Department Head. As of 2016, she is Curator of Oceania & Africa. In 1993 Carol also became an Instructor in the Department of Anthropology and Sociology. She was the co-founder and the Director of the Museum Studies Certificate Programme for MOA and the Department of Continuing Studies in 1996 and 1997. She has participated in several committees at MOA such as the Acquisition Committee, Collections Committee, Research & Teaching Committee, Executive Committee, and the Renewal Project Team. As Head Curator she is responsible for researching her area of specialty, publishing and presenting papers, representing the Curatorial Department on committees, constructing and overseeing departmental budgets, developing exhibitions and collections, and developing acquisitions policies.

Outside of UBC Carol is an instructor at the University of Victoria in the Faculty of History of Art (1989 to present), and at Emily Carr College of Art and Design in the Visual Arts Department and Art History Department (1993 to present). Previous to MOA Carol worked at The Vancouver Museum where she held several positions from 1975 until 1987.

Carol Mayer has published internationally on curatorship, exhibition, design and ceramics. She is active in provincial, national and international museum associations and has served on boards at all these levels. She has chaired and organized BC Museums Association Conferences as in the year 2000 where she was on the Planning Committee. The Canadian Museums Association awarded her in 1984 with the National Award of Merit for Curatorship and in 1991 with the National Award for Outstanding Achievement. In 2009 she received the International Council of Museums Canada International Achievement award. Many of her exhibition projects have involved collaborative work with communities and their artists, whether they be local or far afield.

Noah Shakespeare

  • LAC|0040C8856
  • Person
  • 1839 - 1921

Noah Shakspeare was a photographer, politician, labourer, activist, and civil servant. He was born on January 26, 1839 in Brierley Hill, England, son of Noah Shakespeare and Hannah Matthews. He married Eliza Jane Pearson on December 26, 1859, and they had seven children, of whom three sons and one daughter survived infancy. He and his family moved to Victoria, where he took up a career as a photographer from 1864 to the 1870s. He was elected and served as mayor of Victoria, B. C. in 1882 - 1888. He died on May 13, 1921 in Victoria.

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