Showing 310 results

authority records

Leonard Humphreys

  • Person

Leonard Humphreys was a member of the Sudan Civil Service. During Leonard Humphrey’s post as a member in Sudan Civil Service, he took photographs and drew sketches which he later compiled into scrapbooks. The Sudan Civil Service was a branch of the British Civil Service working in Egypt during the period between World War One and the 1950’s.

Ruth Phillips

  • Person
  • [19-?] -

Ruth Phillips served as Director of the Museum of Anthropology from 1997 - 2002.

Director of the Museum of Anthropology

  • Person
  • 1947 -

The Director of the Museum of Anthropology (MOA) is directly responsible for the general administration of the museum. Responsibilities carried out by the director include, but are not limited to: directing the development of museum policy, ensuring that the museum’s mandate is met and carried out, overseeing budgets and funding, maintaining correspondence with potential donors and managing staff. The Director also administers facilities and building maintenance and is responsible for overseeing exhibits and special programming hosted by the museum. As a part of the University of British Columbia (UBC), the director reports to the Dean of Arts.

MOA opened in 1947 and Dr. Harry Hawthorn, a professor of Anthropology, was appointed the first director in that year. He remained in this position until his retirement in 1974, when Michael Ames became the second director. Ames was director until he retired in 1997, when Ruth Phillips became director. She left the position in 2002, at which point Ames returned to MOA as Acting Director until Anthony Shelton was appointed as director in 2004.

Marjorie M. Halpin

  • Person
  • 1937 - 2000

Marjorie Myers Halpin was born on February 11, 1937 in Tampa, Florida. She received both her Bachelor and Master of Arts degrees in Anthropology from George Washington University in 1962 and 1965 respectively. Between 1963 and 1968, Halpin was employed as a docent and an instructor in anthropology at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. During this time, she was also a part-time lecturer at George Washington University. Halpin’s involvement as teacher and scholar at the University of British Columbia began in 1968 when she was hired as a sessional lecturer in the Anthropology Department. Her duties evolved to include part-time curating at the Museum of Anthropology at U.B.C. She received her Ph.D. from U.B.C. in 1973 and was hired for the position of Assistant Professor and Curator in the same year. Halpin was promoted to the rank of Associate Professor and Curator at U.B.C. in 1981 and remained in this position until the time of her death in 2000. She was also Acting Director of the Museum from 1983 to 1984.

As a professor in U.B.C.’s Anthropology Department, Halpin taught both lower and higher level anthropology courses. She also supervised the work of many Master’s and Ph.D.-level students and served as Chair and University Examiner for numerous Ph.D. students. As part of U.B.C.’s faculty, Halpin served on various committees including the Department Equity Committee, the Graduate Studies Committee and Green College’s Membership Committee. As scholar and writer, Halpin’s main interests were in Coast Tsimshian and Gitksan ethnology, museum anthropology, and the anthropology of art and ritual, which led her to produce many articles and essays on native art and culture. In addition, Halpin also gave presentations and public lectures at national and international conferences. She wrote two books, Totem Poles: An Illustrated Guide and Jack Shadbolt and the Coastal Indian Image, both of which were published as part of the Museum of Anthropology’s Museum Note Series. Halpin also edited and reviewed many publications within the anthropological field and contributed chapters to Canadian Encyclopedia, The Handbook of North American Indians and Consciousness and Inquiry, among many other publications. Her scholarly interests have also led to her involvement with electronic publications on Northwest Coast art, namely with CD-Roms and websites.

Halpin was an active member of numerous societies such as the Canadian Ethnology Society, the Canadian Museums Association and the Native Studies Art Association of Canada. She was also a member of the Tri-Council (MRC, SSHRC, NRC) Committee on Collections Documentation (2000), Chair of the Totem Pole Advisory Committee for the Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation (1983-84) and Chair of the Committee on Museum Ethics for the Canadian Ethnology Society (1974-75). In addition to her duties as teacher, scholar and anthropologist, Halpin also took on the role of consultant for numerous private projects. Marjorie Halpin passed away in White Rock in 2000.

Michael Kew

  • Person
  • 1932 -

Dr. J.E. Michael Kew was born in Quesnel, British Columbia in 1932. Kew received his B.A. at the University of British Columbia in 1955 and was appointed the Assistant Curator of Anthropology at the Provincial Museum in Victoria from 1956-1959. Following a four-year period in Saskatchewan, where he was employed as a Community Development Officer at the Department of Natural Resources and a Research Assistant in Anthropology at the University of Saskatchewan, Kew returned to the University of British Columbia in 1965 as Instructor of Anthropology. During his appointment as Visiting Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Kew obtained his Ph.D. at the University of Washington, Seattle in 1970.

As part of his curatorial responsibilities at the Museum of Anthropology (MOA), Dr. Kew curated a special exhibition of Central Coast Salish art objects in 1980 entitled Visions of Power, Symbols of Wealth: Central Coast Salish Sculpture and Engraving. In preparation for the exhibition, Dr. Kew was funded by a grant from SSHRC in 1979 to visit North American museums housing Central Coast Salish sculptural objects. The objective of his travels was to create a collection of images and documentation of the sculptures found in the various museums. The majority of the objects exhibited in Visions of Power, Symbols of Wealth came from the collections of the former National Museum of Canada and the Museum of the American Indian. The collections of the British Columbia Provincial Museum, Royal Ontario Museum, American Museum of Natural History, Field Museum of Natural History, Brooklyn Art Museum, Thomas Burke Memorial Washing State Museum and the British Museum are also represented.

At the Museum of Anthropology, Michael Kew worked as Curator of Ethnology from 1977 to 1979. He curated a MOA exhibit on central Coast Salish three-dimensional art ca. 1993-1997. He also served as chair of the Ways and Means Committee beginning in 1993 when the committee was established.

University of British Columbia. Museum of Anthropology. Public Programming and Education

  • Corporate body
  • ca. 1971 -

Audrey Hawthorn, as the Museum of Anthropology first official Curator, was the person initially responsible for Public Programming and Education. In Hawthorn’s time the function involved mainly exhibitions and the programs surrounding them, as well as raising the profile of the museum. When plans for a new building got underway more formal programming guidelines were developed. A Museum Programming Committee was formed in 1971, charged with the function of suggesting programmes for the new museum, which was at this time still in the planning phase. Along with other museum committees, this committee was given the task of developing programming ideas to help dictate the needs of the new building. Their mandate was to establish policy guidelines for museum programming.

In 1974 the Museum Public Programming Committee decided on two spheres of programming: academic and public programmes. Since this time, these functions have been shared by different positions with various titles. These position titles include Extension Curator, Education Curator, Museum Programme Coordinator, Public Programming Coordinator and Curator of Public Programmes.

Individuals that have been involved in these functions were often employed full time in the Museum, while others were employed part-time as museum curators and part-time as professors in the Department of Anthropology. These curators have traditionally had a very fluid function and their roles have included many additional responsibilities outside of public programming and education. These individuals include:

-Audrey Hawthorn, Curator (1947-1977)
-Elvi Whittaker, Coordinator of Public Programming (1973-1976)
-Hindaleah (Hindy) Ratner, Extension Curator (1978-1995) (on leave May -October 1984, January-July 1985, and September 1986-February 1987)
-Madeline Bronsdon Rowan, Curator of Ethnology and Public Programming and professor of Anthropology (April 1977-December 1986) (on leave 1979 and 1986)
-Margaret Stott, Curator of Ethnology and Education, and Professor of Anthropology (1979-1990)
-Roberta Kremer, Acting Education Curator (July 1989-June 1991) Acting Curator of Education and Volunteer Coordinator (1990-1991) Acting Education/Public Programming Curator (while Jill Baird was on leave January 2007- January 2008)
-Louise Jackson, Curator of Ethnology and Education (July 1991-1995) (on leave 1993-1995)
-Rosa Ho, Curator of Art and Public Programming (January 1988-1999) Curator of Art and Public Programming and Education (1992, 1996-1999)
-Jill Baird, Education/Public Programming Curator (March 1999-present) (on leave January 2007-January 2008)

Graduate students Margaret Holm and Susan Hull coordinated extension duties and programmes in Rowan and Ratners' absence in 1986 and 1987. There was no official replacement for the Extension or Education Curators during the absence of Rowan and Ratner nor with their resignations in 1986. This continued until Rosa Ho was appointed as the full-time Curator of Art and Public Programming in January 1988. She added Education Curator to her title in 1992 and again after the departure of Jackson in 1996. She held the position of Curator of Art, Public Programming and Education until she left in 1999.

Jill Baird took over the position of Education/Public Programming Curator in March 1999. This new position included the majority of the functions of the Art and Public Programming Curator, as well as the traditional functions of both the Extension and Education Curator and some additional responsibilities.

The function of Public Programming and Education has traditionally been responsible for exhibitions, education, public programs, and extension activities at the Museum of Anthropology. The primary function of this area was to locate cultures within the world context of art, to prepare exhibits, including travelling exhibits, to enhance cultural understanding and enjoyment of cultural diversity, and to cut across the disciplinary boundaries of art history, anthropology, and archaeology. These functions were developed in particular ways for specialized audiences through Exhibitions, Education, Public Programmes, and Extension activities.

The Education function has included establishing and supervising school programmes for students and teachers, and training members of the Volunteer Associates to conduct these programmes. Programmed activities included orientation walks, self-guided visits to the museum, cultural performances, and a variety of participatory sessions designed to complement the school curriculum, this included the development of units of curriculum and "touchable" artifact kits. School artifact kits included specially designed information and artifacts that were packaged and lent out to British Columbia schools to further anthropological education outside of the museum setting. The education programming also provided professional development workshops for teachers and students.

Public Programmes included artists' talks and panel discussions, storytelling, music, performances, workshops, lectures, non-credit courses, museum tours, identification clinics and audio-visual presentations.

Extension activities included the loaning out of exhibit materials and creation of travelling exhibitions. This included coordinating the development of in-house exhibitions, special events and lectures in conjunction with exhibits, exhibits in office spaces, and installations in off-campus locations.

The Museum's current public programming mandate, as of 1999, seeks to provide a forum for cultural expression, experimentation, and exchange of views. This is done through a variety of programs, including public talks, demonstration, guided gallery tours, lectures, hands-on workshops, artist talks, music, performances, film viewing and educational programs.

The Museum's current educational programming mandate is to develop and deliver quality programs to elementary and secondary school students that introduces them to other cultures and makes innovative use of the Museum's collections, exhibitions, and other resources. These programs include elementary and secondary classes, special programs developed in conjunction with temporary exhibitions, the Musqueam School, and summer day camps. Many of the educational programs are jointly developed with artists and other institutions.

Hindaleah Ratner

  • Person
  • [19-?] -

Hindy Ratner graduated with an MA in Museology and Anthropology from the University of Toronto in 1972. Previous to her employment with the University of British Columbia's Museum of Anthropology (MOA) she worked at the National Museum of Man (now the Canadian Museum of Civilization) in Ottawa, and at the BC Provincial Museum as Extension Curator. Ratner served on the ICOM Committee for Ethnology (1977-?), the board of the Jewish Festival of the Arts, and on the board of the BC Touring Council for the Performing Arts (1983-1985). Ratner was hired full time as Extension Curator at MOA in 1977.

Ratner was on a leave-of-absence from May to October 1984, maternity leave from January to July 1985, and on another leave-of-absence from September 1986 until her resignation in February, 1987. Graduate students Margaret Holm and Susan Hull performed Ratner’s duties while she was on leave. The position of Extension Curator was succeeded by the hiring of Rosa Ho as Curator of Art and Public Programmes in January 1988.

Friends of the Museum of Anthropology

  • Corporate body
  • 1977 - ca. 1985

Formally incorporated on December 23rd 1977, the Friends of the Museum of Anthropology at U.B.C. (University of British Columbia) was a society that had four main objectives:

• To promote interest in, and acquaint the public with the Museum of Anthropology at U.B.C.
• To provide for the holding of educational lectures, exhibitions, public meetings, classes and conferences on the subject of anthropology
• To acquire, accept, solicit or receive any gift or real or personal property as a contribution or addition to the funds of the society
• To receive, hold, distribute, invest and reinvest contributions from donors for the collections of and operation of the Museum of Anthropology at U.B.C.

The operations of the society were physically carried out in the museum. The affairs of the society were managed by a board of 24 directors; six were directly tasked with its initial establishment, while another 18 were elected at the first annual general meeting. Various committees and sub-committees were established, including the executive committee, who had the power to exercise the will of the board. Other committees included the membership committee and the sub-committees on Finance and Fundraising. Michael Ames, then-Director of the Museum of Anthropology, worked as the secretary for the society for most of its life-span. The society was directly involved with a 1981 benefit concert that took place in the Haida House to raise funds for a special gallery for a Haida canoe they wished to acquire. The friends’ peak of activity was from 1978-1982, after which time it became less and less active; dissolution occurred sometime around 1985.

Kersti Krug

  • Person
  • [19-?] -

Kersti Krug is a researcher and writer in the field of non-profit management, and a former Director of Communications and Manager of Research and Evaluation at the Museum of Anthropology (MOA) at the University of British Columbia (UBC).

Before joining MOA, Krug was Senior Personnel Advisor to the Auditor General of Canada (1980) and Assistant Director of the National Gallery of Canada (1980-1988). Between 1991 and 1997, she worked for the UBC Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration as a researcher, instructor, and Acting Director of the Arts Administration Option.

In 1990, Krug began work at MOA. Her first position at MOA was Director of Communications (1990-1998); subsequently, she occupied the roles of Manager of Research and Evaluation (1998-2001) and director of the Certificate in Museum Studies program (1997-1998). Her work at MOA involved program development and organizational change management. Major projects included creating marketing projects, conducting visitor studies, co-creation and development of the Certificate in Museum Studies program, project management for the expansion of the MOA building, developing business plans, and grant writing.

During this period, Krug was also director of studies for an interdisciplinary graduate program in critical curatorial studies in the Faculty of Arts (1998-2001). After leaving MOA in 2001, Krug joined the Faculty of Graduate Studies as Assistant Dean, Strategic Planning and Communications (2001-2006). She was instrumental in the 2007 founding of the College for Interdisciplinary Studies, of which she became Assistant Principal, Strategic Development and Administration. Krug retired form this position in 2009 to work as a consultant.

Krug completed her MBA at UBC in 1990, and in 1999 received her PhD from UBC’s Individual Interdisciplinary Studies Graduate Program. Her thesis on managing administrative change in MOA is entitled “A hypermediated ethnography of organizational change: conversations in the Museum of Anthropology.”

Skooker Broome

  • Person
  • [19-?] -

Skooker Broome received an undergraduate degree in Anthropology from the University of British Columbia (UBC). Also at UBC, he took graduate courses in Museum Studies. His other educational pursuits include the study of German and French architecture, computer sciences, lighting design, web publishing, structural drafting, and the French language.

From 1986 to 1990, Broome worked at UBC's Museum of Anthropology (MOA) as an Assistant Designer. His duties included participating in the designing, production, and installation of a number of exhibits held at the Museum, teaching design principles to the Anthropology 431 “Museum Principles and Practices” class, and producing & designing museum catalogues, brochures, invitations, and program schedules.

From 1990 to the present, Broome has been working as a Designer on a number of exhibits at the Museum of Anthropology. Broome’s tasks include designing, developing, planning, and installing museum exhibits and displays, teaching design principles to Anthropology students, and managing projects. His other duties include the management of the Museum’s building facilities and service, and he further works as a computer specialist and coordinator of computer technologies. In addition to his work at the Museum of Anthropology, Broome works as a contract designer for Third Eye Design, where he designs, develops, plans, installs, and consults on commercial projects.

James Herbert Watson

  • Person
  • 1934 -

James Herbert (Herb) Watson was born 5 December 1934 in Ontario. He studied Science at Waterloo College and Fine Arts at the Ontario College of Art, Toronto. In 1960, he spent one year at the Kokoschka International Academy of Vision in Salzburg, Austria.

During the late 1960s and early 1970s, Herb Watson worked as an exhibition designer in a number of museum environments: the Vancouver Maritime Museum and Vancouver City Museum, 1966; the Vancouver Centennial Museum, 1969; the Maritime and City Museums, 1970-1977. In 1977, he took a one year visiting appointment at the Museum Of Anthropology (hereafter MOA). In 1978, he became Exhibit Designer at MOA.

While at MOA, Herb Watson designed over sixty exhibitions, ten of which traveled across Canada and many of which involved student trainees. He regularly taught exhibit design to students in the introductory museum course (Anthropology 431) and supervised the design and installation of annual student exhibitions. He was frequently invited to give lectures and workshops at other universities and museum associations.

From 1985-90, Herb Watson managed a contract to research design and install the South Pacific Pavilion at Expo '86. His role included representing eight South Seas nations and travelling to the South Pacific to acquire artifacts. Between 1988 and 1990, Herb Watson designed the west wing extension of MOA that would house the Koerner Ceramics Collection. Herb Watson retired from MOA 28 February 28 1991.

Darrin Morrison

  • Person
  • 1965 -

Darrin Morrison was born on April 19, 1965 in Toronto, Ontario. From 1984 – 88 he attended the Ontario College of Art and Design. From 1991 – 1994 he was enrolled at the University of British Columbia (UBC), attending classes in Museum Studies, Conservation, and Chemistry. During the time Darrin Morrison was enrolled at UBC, he worked as a Museum Consultant, creating Emergency Contingency Plans for several local museums

From 1991 to 2005, he was employed at the Museum of Anthropology (MOA) at UBC. He was originally employed as a Preventive Conservation Specialist (1991-93) and moved into the position of Project Manager in the area of Preventive Conservation and Design, before his departure. Morrison’s tasks included designing museum exhibitions and displays as well as planning and implementing preventive conservation measures for the collections. He also taught and supervised students in classes such as preventive conservation, exhibition design, museum principles and methods. Besides teaching and working at MOA, Morrison also devoted time to instructing at cultural centres and small museums.

Rosa Ho

  • Person
  • 1949 - 2001

Rosa Ho was born on August 22, 1949 in Hong Kong. After moving to Canada, Ho earned a Bachelor of Arts in Art History and a Masters of Arts with a specialization in Chinese Art from the University of British Columbia. She began her museum career with a volunteer position at the Winnipeg Art Gallery. In 1975 after completing some years of service at the Winnipeg Art Gallery, she was appointed as the museum’s Assistant Curator, a position she held until 1977. After moving back to British Columbia in 1978, she was appointed as Curator at the Surrey Art Gallery. She was promoted to Director of the gallery in 1980 and continued in this position until 1987. In 1988, she left the Surrey Art Gallery to begin working for the Museum of Anthropology as the Curator of Art and Public Programmes.

As the Curator of Art and Public Programming, she was responsible for activities surrounding the planning and production of exhibitions and public programmes for contemporary art, Inuit and First Nations art, community-based public programmes, and museum education.

Throughout her career, Ho had numerous professional affiliations and served on a number of local, provincial, and national arts committees. Ho also published extensively during her career on the subject of cultural identity. Rosa Ho passed away in 2001.

Pam Brown

  • Person
  • [19-?] -

Pam Brown is currently (as of 2015) a curator in the Pacific Northwest Department of the UBC Museum of Anthropology (MOA), where she is responsible for the Heiltsuk, Wuikinuxv, Tahltan, Ktunaxa, Tsilhqot'in, and Tlingit collections. She has curated and co-curated a number of exhibits at MOA including ‘Mehodihi: Well-Known Traditions of Tahltan People’ (2003) and ‘Telling Our Stories, A Profile of Tahltan/Tlingit Artist Dempsey Bob’ (2001). She has worked closely with the Heiltsuk community on many projects and has contributed to the creation of a number of MOA sourcebooks, including ‘The Honor of One is the Honor of All’ (1996-2005) and ‘My Ancestors Are Still Dancing’ (2003).

Brown graduated with a Master of Arts degree from the University of British Columbia in 1994, having written a thesis and curated an exhibit at MOA entitled ‘Cannery Days: A Chapter In The Lives of the Heiltsuk,’ about the lives of Heiltsuk men and women in the BC fish processing industry. In 1994-1995 she was involved with the design and implementation of the Aboriginal Museum Internship Program (AMIP) and the Aboriginal Cultural Stewardship Program (ACSP) at MOA, two programs which provided native participants with practical training in how to develop low-cost, effective displays and resource materials on cultural subjects for their communities. In 1999, Brown coordinated a ‘Repatriation Forum’ which brought 180 First Nations members and museum professionals to UBC’s First Nations House of Learning to discuss the shared experiences of repatriation between First Nations in B.C. and tribes from the USA. Since 1999, Brown has also acted as supervisor of the Native Youth Programme.

Lynn Hill

  • Person
  • [19-?] -

Lynn Hill was curator-in-residence at the Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia from ca. 1998-2000, and curated the exhibit “Raven’s Reprise” (January 2000-January 2001). She is a member of the Iroquois Confederacy from the Six Nations of the Grand River and was born in Hamilton, Ontario. Hill has curated various contemporary First Nations art exhibitions, including The Traveling Alter Native Medicine Show (Vancouver, 1999), LICK (Toronto, 1997), Godi’nigoha’: The Woman’s Mind (Brantford, 1997), and AlterNative: Contemporary Photo Compositions (Toronto/Ottawa, 1995-1996). She is a founding member of the artist collective LICK and of the ALA curatorial collective.

Karen Duffek

  • Person
  • [19-?] -

Karen Duffek is a curator at the Museum of Anthropology (MOA) at the University of British Columbia (UBC). In spring of 1983, she received her Masters of Arts in Anthropology from UBC with a thesis titled The Contemporary Northwest Coast Indian Art Market. Karen Duffek’s relationship with MOA has spanned over twenty years. From 1985 through 1999, Duffek was a Guest Curator and Research Associate, during which time she worked closely with Marjorie Halpin. In 1999, she took on a role as Interim Manager in Administration at MOA. In 2000, she was hired by MOA as a Curator of Contemporary Visual Arts & the Pacific Northwest. Since 1985, Duffek has published numerous articles, essays, and anthologies addressing issues in Native Art. She has written multiple exhibition catalogues, including The Transforming Image: Painted Arts of Northwest Coast First Nations (UBC Press, 2000), which she co-authored with Bill McLennan. The Transforming Image won the Canadian Museum Association’s 2001 Award for Outstanding Achievement in Publications, and the British Columbia Historical Federation’s Certificate of Merit for Historical Writing in 2000. In 2005, Karen Duffek co-edited the anthology, Bill Reid and Beyond: Expanding on Modern Native Art (Douglas & McIntyre, 2004).

As the Curator of Contemporary Visual Arts & the Pacific Northwest, Karen Duffek has curated some major exhibitions at MOA, including Border Zones: New Art across Cultures (2010), and Robert Davidson: The Abstract Edge (2004).

Inge Ruus

  • Person

Ingeborg (Inge) Ruus worked as a Curatorial Assistant at the Museum of Anthropology (MOA) at the University of British Columbia (UBC). She received a Bachelor of Arts degree from the UBC in 1975. Prior to completing her studies Ruus worked at MOA as a volunteer in the position of Registrar from 1948-1977. While completing her studies she became involved in an unofficial capacity with the MOA. In 1976 she was instrumental in mounting the Guatemala Highlands exhibit which focused on textiles from that region. In 1977 Ruus was hired by MOA as a Curatorial Assistant specializing in Ethnology. However, due to illness Ruus’s official tenure at MOA was short lived, and she left the museum in the latter part of 1977.

Audrey Patricia Mackay Shane

  • Person
  • 1922 -

Audrey Patricia MacKay Shane was born on August 27, 1922 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. She received a diploma in Interior Design from the University of Manitoba in 1942 and worked for the Department of Architecture and Fine Arts at the University for the next three years. In the period between 1962 and 1970, she served in voluntary roles such as secretary of the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra and treasurer of the Manitoba Archaeological Society. In 1974, Shane received her Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology from the University of British Columbia (UBC). A year later, she was hired as Archivist/Librarian at the Museum of Anthropology, a position she held until she was appointed Curator of Documentation in 1979. As Archivist/Librarian, Shane was responsible for the documentation of the Museum’s collections for inclusion in the National Inventory of Canada as well as for the cataloguing of the collections.

Shane completed her M.A. in Anthropology in UBC in 1978. Her primary interest was in the art and material culture of the northern Northwest Coast, China, Japan and the Insular Pacific before the 20th century. As the Curator of Documentation, Shane’s responsibilities included ensuring the accurate permanent catalogue records were created and maintained for the Museum’s collections, interpreting the Museum’s collections to the public and students through exhibits, publications, university and community teaching, and representing the museum on a local and international level. She taught a series of laboratory sessions in Anthropology 431, Museum Principles and Methods, a course offered by UBC’s Department of Anthropology and also conducted lectures and seminars for the Museum’s volunteers. Shane has written various scholarly articles and presented many papers in numerous conferences. Her published articles include “Sensibilities: Unsuspected Multicultural Harmonies” which appeared in the March/April 1983 issue of Canadian Collector, “Power in Their Hands: the Gitsontk,” which was published in The Tsimshian: Images of the Past Views for the Present and “Networking: the Canadian Experience,” a paper published for the Western Museum Conference in 1983. Shane has also curated a number of exhibitions and served on the Acquisitions and Collections Committees within the Museum. In addition, she was active in committees formed by professional associations such as the British Columbia Museum Association Committee on Legal and Ethical Questions. She also assumed the role of Signing Expert Examiner in Ethnography for the Canadian Cultural Property Export and Import Board. Shane retired from her position at the Museum in 1987.

Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC)

  • Corporate body
  • 1989 -

The Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation is the result of a call by Australian Prime Minister Bob Hawke in January 1989 for Asian-Pacific economies to consult on how they could effectively cooperate and increase trade and investment flows in the Asia-Pacific. Australia’s motive was to create an Asia-Pacific economic identity, of which it would be an integral part. Japan endorsed the Australian proposal and became the second driving force in the creation of APEC. The first APEC meeting of trade and foreign ministers took place in Canberra in November of 1989 (with twelve attendees: Australia, Brunei, Canada, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and the U.S.).
A summit or Leaders’ Meeting has become an annual event since President Clinton invited leaders to Blake Island in 1993. The first APEC Leaders’ Meeting was held in Seattle in November 1993. This first Leaders’ Meeting of economies represented half the world’s population and 56% of its GNP. A year later all APEC leaders met at Bogor, Indonesia, and at that meeting the Leaders resolved to move to free trade and investment by 2010 for industrialized member economies, and by 2020 for developing member economies. The 1995 meetings were in Osaka, Japan where the Osaka Action Agenda was agreed to, setting out a template for future APEC work towards common goals. The Philippines convened the APEC Leaders’ Meeting in 1996 at Subic Bay. The Leaders’ Meeting was held in Vancouver, Canada in 1997 at the Museum of Anthropology on the University of British Columbia campus.
The following countries are members of APEC as of 1999: Australia, Brunei, Darussalam, Canada, Chile, China, Hong Kong SAR, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Philippines, Russia, Singapore, Chinese Taipei, Thailand, United States, and Vietnam.
APEC has two standing committees, 10 working groups, and a few other forums that report to the Senior Officials Meeting. The two committees are the Committee for Trade and Investment (CTI) and the Economic Committee (EC). The CTI deals with trade and investment liberalization and business facilitation concerns. The role of the EC continues to evolve. It is primarily responsible for providing the Senior Officials Meeting with information and analysis on broad, crosscutting issues which are not easily handled by one of the working groups.
The ten working groups are: Trade and Investment Data, Trade Promotion, Investment and Industrial Science and Technology, Human Resource Development, Energy, Marine Resource Conservation, Telecommunications, Fisheries, Transportation, and Tourism.

Elizabeth Lominska Johnson

  • 1941 -

Elizabeth Lominska Johnson was born in Ossining, New York in 1941. In 1963, she received a B.A. in Psychology from Bucknell University. After receiving this degree she travelled in Europe for a year. In 1965 she married Graham Johnson. In 1967, she received a M.A. in Anthropology from Cornell University. Subsequently Johnson moved to Hong Kong where she lived from 1968 to 1971. Johnson continued to study at Cornell and in 1976 she received a Ph.D. in Anthropology upon completion of her dissertation, "Households and Lineages in an Urban Chinese Village," which is a study of the effects of rapid urbanization upon kinship groups in a two-lineage Hakka village.

In 1974 and 1975 Elizabeth Lominska Johnson was engaged as the "Coordinator, China Resources Project," at the University of British Columbia (UBC). In this position she acted as a liaison between local schools and researchers focusing on China at UBC. In 1977, she was employed as a museum cataloguer on a part-time basis both by MacMillan Bloedel, and by the Museum of Anthropology (MOA). From 1978 to 1979, she was employed as the Public Programmes Coordinator by the Vancouver Museum and Planetarium Association, where she developed, implemented and supervised new courses, social events, and lectures. Since March 1979, she has been an employee of the Museum of Anthropology. Until August 1986, she was Curator of Collections. In this position Johnson was responsible for the intellectual and administrative control of artifacts in the museum’s collection through registration, conservation, loan procedures; development of policy and procedures, the planning a new textile storage system, providing collections information to the public and the creation of publications relating to the collection.

Since August of 1986, she held the position of Curator of Ethnology. Several of her responsibilities continued to the new position, including curatorial activities and development of policies and procedures. New responsibilities included: teaching the course "Museum Principles and Methods" in Anthropology as well as occasional courses in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, the maintenance of collections documentation, maintenance and development of museum archives, managing public access to archives and supervising archival workers, appraising artifacts where required for accessioning or income tax receipts, maintaining financial records on the collections curating and coordinating exhibits, as well as taking on curatorial initiatives to develop and promote the East Asian collections in specific and the world-wide textile collection in general. In 1988, the responsibility for the MOA Archives was transferred to Johnson from Audrey Shane. Subsequently, in 1999 responsibility for the archives was transferred to the newly hired museum archivist.

Johnson’s work however was not restricted to the tasks required by her various positions at the museum. Johnson has also published works suitable for academic, museum and public audiences. These publications include exhibit catalogues, articles and book reviews. She has been active in community and professional associations, including: the Canadian Museums Association; the British Columbia Museums Association; the Royal Asiatic Society, Hong Kong Branch; the Association for Asian Studies; the Archives Association of British Columbia; the Textile Society of Hong Kong; and the Canadian Asian Studies Association. She has regularly attended and participated in conferences, where she has presented papers on such diverse topics as Chinese ethnology, textile conservation, museum studies, archives, the development of curatorial partnerships, visible storage, textiles, repatriation, and Cantonese opera. Apart from her involvement with conferences Johnson has also been an active participant in the academic and museum communities at an international level. Beginning in 1998, she was a grant application assessor for the University Grants Committee in Hong Kong. In the same year she also took on work as an external examiner for the Department of Anthropology at the Chinese University of Hong Kong as well as taking on a position as an advisor to the Hong Kong Heritage Museum. Johnson was also highly involved in the local Vancouver community. From 1983 to 1995 she was a member of the Chinatown Historic Area Planning Committee in Vancouver. Beginning in 1998, she was also a member of the Vancouver Chinese Cultural Centre Museum and Archives Committee. In the fall of 2006 Johnson officially retired, though she continues to maintain her relationship with the Museum of Anthropology in a research capacity.

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