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authority records

Thomas Crosby

  • Person
  • June 21, 1840 - January 13, 1914

Rev. Thomas Crosby, son of Thomas Crosby and Mary Ward, was born in Pickering, Yorkshire, England on June 21, 1840. In 1856, Crosby migrated to Canada with his parents, settling near Woodstock, Upper Canada. In 1858 he joined the Wesleyan Methodist Church and became a preacher. In 1861, Crosby was working as a tanner in Woodstock when he read a call in the Methodist Christian Guardian (Toronto) for missionaries to work on the west coast. He left his job and paid his own way to Vancouver Island, arriving in Victoria in 1862.

In 1863, Crosby worked as an assistant to Cornelius Bryant at a Methodist mission in Nanaimo. In Nanaimo, Crosby met his first protégé Santana (later renamed to David Sallosalton) who joined Crosby in his efforts. Crosby and David lived and worked together. David was well known for his “Steamboat Whistle Sermon” but passed away in 1873 at the age of 19 from tuberculosis. In 1869, he was moved to the missions on the lower mainland, where Chilliwack was his home base. His success was rewarded in 1871 with ordination to the ministry in the Wesleyan Methodist Church in Canada. In the winter of 1873–74, Rev. Crosby toured Ontario to raise funds for missions and to search for a wife.

Emma Jane Douse, daughter of John Douse and Eliza Milner, was born on April 14, 1849 in Cobourg, Ontario. Her father, John Douse, had emigrated from England in the early 1830s to convert the Six Nations, and by Emma's birth in 1849 was a highly respected Methodist minister in Ontario. Emma trained at Hamilton's Wesleyan Female College, an institution offering higher learning for women in literature and classics. After completing her education, Emma became a teacher at Wesleyan Female College. In late January 1874, Rev. Crosby spoke at Emma’s College about supporting the missionary effort. Short weeks after meeting Rev. Crosby, she wrote home to her mother and expressed her desire to travel with him to British Columbia. Rev. Crosby and Emma married on April 30, 1874 in Cobourg, Ontario.

Following their marriage, Rev. Crosby and Emma traveled to Fort Simpson (from 1880, known as Port Simpson) near present day Prince Rupert at the invitation of the Tsimshian people. For the next quarter of a century they lived among the Tsimshian people, whose territory stretches between the Nass and Skeena rivers. Rev. Crosby and Emma set up schools and boarding homes for the Tsimshian children. Rev. Crosby and other missionaries encouraged single-family homes over multi-family homes and patriarchal succession over matrilineal family concepts. In 1880, a village council was established to replace native forms of government and Rev. Crosby acted as head of the council. In 1876, a large frame church was completed to symbolize Rev. Crosby’s efforts. During his tenure there were major revivals, each lasting several months, in 1874–75, 1877, 1881–82, and 1892–93.

In addition to his work at Port Simpson, Rev. Crosby established an itinerancy system along the coast from Bella Bella in the south to villages along the Nass and Skeena rivers in the north. It frequently required up to 1,000 miles of travel per year and was initially served by canoe. In November 1884, the mission acquired a ship, the Glad Tidings.

Rev. Crosby and Emma had seven daughters (Jessie, Grace, Ida Mary, Gertrude Louise, and three others) and one son (Thomas Harold). The mortality rate among the Tsimshian was high, and four of his daughters died at Port Simpson, three of them from diphtheria in 1885 and 1886; Emma was also in poor health.

In 1894, Rev. Crosby was appointed superintendent of Indian missions in British Columbia for the Methodist Church. Rev. Crosby and his family left Port Simpson in 1897 for Victoria, where he also assumed the chairmanship of the British Columbia Conference. His health was beginning to decline, and he suffered especially from a growing problem with asthma. From 1899 to 1907 he ran the missions at Sardis and Chilliwack; he then retired to Vancouver. Rev. Crosby became well known for this missionary work. He was superannuated in 1907 and moved to New Westminster. In failing health, he moved to Vancouver and passed away January 13, 1914; his wife Emma, passed away on August 11, 1926 in Sidney British Columbia.

Thomas Crosby is the author of David Sallosalton ([1906?]), Among the An-ko-me-nums, or Flathead tribes of Indians of the Pacific coast (1907), and Up and down the North Pacific coast by canoe and mission ship ([1914]), all published in Toronto.

Joan D. Witney

  • Person
  • [19-?]

Dr. Joan D. Witney (also known as Dr. Joan Witney-Moore) was one of the three founding doctors of the first Community Health Clinic opened under the Saskatchewan Medical Care Insurance Act (1962). Witney had originally trained as a nurse, graduating in the first year that nurses were granted a Bachelor of Nursing degree. After the Second World War, she worked at Norway House and Moosonee. Witney-Moore trained as a doctor and interned at the Charles Camsell Hospital in Edmonton during the 1950s.
In early July 1962, Drs. Joan Witney, Margaret Mahood, and Sam Wolfe helped the Community Health Services Association open Saskatchewan’s first Community Health Clinic. Witney provided medical care during the twenty-three-day strike by most of the province’s doctors, but left the clinic at the end of the strike later in July.

Stanley E. Read

  • Person
  • February 7, 1900 - April 8, 1997

Stanley E. Read was born on February 7, 1900, in Rock Island, Quebec. He earned the degrees of Bachelor of Arts in 1923 and Master of Arts in 1925 from McGill University in Montreal, Quebec. After going to France on a scholarship from 1925 to 1927 and a brief employment at Bishop’s College in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Read moved to Chicago, Illinois in 1928 to work as an English Professor at DePaul University. While in Chicago, he met his wife, Ruth Read, whom he married in 1940. In 1946, Read moved to Vancouver and joined the Department of English at the University of British Columbia. He continued to teach in the department until his retirement in 1971. Read passed away in Vancouver on April 8, 1997 at the age of 97.

Read’s lasting contributions to the University of British Columbia are numerous. In 1953, Read was one of the eight U.B.C. professors who, along with writer Roderick Haig-Brown, started a foundation at U.B.C. with a small sum of money accumulated from “various bets and fines for illegal or non-ethical fishing methods” during a group fishing holiday at Upper Campbell Lake. The foundation, playfully called “The Harry Hawthorn Foundation for the Inculcation and Propagation of the Principles and Ethics of Fly-Fishing,” used its proceeds to purchase books on angling and game fishing for the U.B.C. Library, and over time produced what is now known as the Harry Hawthorn Foundation Collection. For 34 years, Read was the Secretary of the foundation and organized their annual fishing trips. Read was also instrumental in the organization of U.B.C.’s International House, and played a formative role in the creation of the University of British Columbia quarterly of English criticism and review, Canadian Literature.

Read wrote a number of articles, books, bibliographies, and book reviews about his academic interests and his hobby of fishing. Publications by Read include A Bibliography of Hogarth Books and Studies, 1900-1940 (DePaul University, 1941); Documents of Eighteenth Century Taste (DePaul University, 1942); What Manner of Man Was He? Andrew Carnegie and Libraries in British Columbia (University of British Columbia, 1960); More Recreation for the Contemplative Man: A Supplemental Bibliography of Books on Angling and Game Fish in the University of British Columbia (compiled with Laurenda Daniells. Library of the University of British Columbia, 1971); and A Place Called Pennask: A Capsule History of the Pennask Lake Company, Limited and the Pennask Lake Fishing and Game Club (Mitchell Press, 1977).

Read was also a hobbyist photographer and took many photos during his fishing trips and vacations with his wife, Ruth. Some of his photographs were featured in British Columbia: A Centennial Anthology (McLelland and Stewart, 1958), and one of his photographs was used for the cover of the book A Small and Charming World (Creekstone Press, 2001).

Virginia Kehoe

  • November 2, 1916 - September 15, 2008

Virginia Catherine Kehoe was born in the Kitsilano neighbourhood of Vancouver on November 2, 1916. Upon marrying Bruce Kehoe, Virginia travelled with him to Ottawa, Calgary, Toronto and France as his career in the Royal Canadian Air Force lent itself to a significant amount of travel. Virginia Kehoe trained as an artist, and became close friends with Kwakwaka’wakw artist and carver Douglas Cranmer. She assisted in taking care of Cranmer’s store The Talking Stick on South Granville in Vancouver for part of its existence. Kehoe and her husband moved to Vancouver Island after Bruce Kehoe retired from the RCAF, first settling in Sooke and then moving to Victoria. Towards the end of her life, after the passing of her husband Bruce, Virginia Kehoe moved to Riverwest in Ladner, B.C. to be closer to family. Virginia Kehoe died in Ladner on September 15, 2008.

James Albert Gibson

  • Person
  • May 7, 1938 - February 23, 2009

James “Jim” Albert Gibson was born on May 7, 1938 in Indiana. He studied anthropology at Indiana University, receiving a BA in 1960. In 1964, he graduated from the University of Washington with a Master of Arts degree in Linguistics, and in 1973 he received a Ph.D. in Linguistics from the University of Hawaii, Hilo. Beginning in 1969, Gibson taught Anthropology and Linguistics at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, retiring in 1996 as Associate Professor Emeritus. He died on February 23, 2009, in Flagstaff, Arizona.

Lillian French

  • Person
  • [19-?]

Lillian French, neé Lucey, worked as a nurse and teacher in various communities in British Columbia, the Yukon and the Northwest Territories from the late 1930s to the 1960s, including Port Simpson, Old Crow, YT and Fort MacPherson, NWT. She was also a member of the Anglican Church Women’s Auxiliary. During her career, she collected many examples of Native handicrafts, many of which she received as gifts from her pupils and patients.

John Mennie

  • Person
  • [18-?]-[19-?]

John Mennie was a radio operator in Alert Bay for Bull Harbor, Alert Bay Wireless and Alert Bay Radio between 1930 and 1937.

Wilson Duff

  • Person
  • March 23, 1925 - August 8, 1976

Wilson Duff was born on March 23, 1925. After serving in the Royal Canadian Air Force as a navigator, Duff attended the University of British Columbia and graduated with a B.A. in 1949. Two years later, in 1951, he completed his M.A. in Anthropology from the University of Washington. Duff’s professional research concentrated primarily on the native cultures of the Northwest Coast and he was instrumental in the development of scholarship in this area. His influence on the study and appreciation of Northwest Coast art was also very profound as he inspired artistic work and in some ways was an artist himself, as evidenced by his poetry and the poetic nature of some of his writing.

In 1950, (prior to being awarded his M.A.) Duff was appointed Curator of Anthropology for the British Columbia Provincial Museum, a position he would hold until 1965. From 1960-1965 he directed the British Columbia Government Anthropology Program. In 1965 Duff left the Museum to become a professor of Anthropology in the Department of Anthropology and Sociology at the University of British Columbia. Throughout his career, Duff maintained a close association with museums and galleries, helping to plan buildings and exhibits, and he was involved in the early stages of planning of the new Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia. Two major exhibits by Duff include “Arts of the Raven” shown at the Vancouver Art Gallery (1967) and “Images Stone B.C.” (1975) shown locally in Vancouver and Victoria before travelling to art galleries across Canada.

Duff was active on a number of committees and he was a founding member of the British Columbia Museums Association where he served as Vice-president from 1962-1963 and as President from 1963-1965. Duff also served on the joint British Columbia Provincial Museum and University of British Columbia Totem Pole Preservation Committee that purchased and salvaged some of the last remaining poles in the Queen Charlotte Islands in the 1950’s. In addition, he chaired the provincial government's Archaeological Sites Advisory Board from 1960-1966 and served on the provincial government's Indian Advisory Committee. During this time he led support for legislation to protect British Columbia’s archaeological remains and worked on the draft of British Columbia’s first “Archaeological and Historic Sites Protection Act” that was passed in 1960. In 1960 Duff acted as a consultant for the Kitwancool tribe and served as an expert witness in the Nishga land case before the B.C. Supreme Court in 1969. That same year, on behalf of the Alaska State Museum and the Smithsonian Institution, he surveyed the totem poles of southwest Alaska. Two years later, in 1971, Duff directed a project to record the history of southeast Alaska Indians for the Alaska State Museum.

Throughout his academic career, Wilson Duff wrote a number of articles, manuscripts and books. From 1950-1956 he was the editor of Anthropology in British Columbia and his first publication in 1953 was based on his Master’s Thesis on the Upper Sto:lo Indians. Published articles and book reviews by Duff can be found in Anthropology in British Columbia no.1, 2, 3, 4, 5; The Crowsnest 9(3); Victoria Naturalist vols. 7, 8, 16(7); B.C. Historical Quarterly, July-October 1951; American Anthropologist vol.54, no.4; Canadian Art 11(2); Anthropology in British Columbia Memoir no.4; Western Museums Quarterly 1(3); Museum Round-up no.12, 16; Anthropologica vol. 6, no.1; B.C. Studies no.3, 19; and Northwest Anthropological Research Notes 3(2). Although many of Duff’s manuscripts remain unpublished, a number of his books are considered to be foremost reference sources in their field. Such publications by Duff include: Thunderbird Park, Victoria B.C., (Government Travel Bureau, 1952), Selected List of Publications Pertaining to the Indians of British Columbia (with J.E.M. Kew, 1956); British Columbia Atlas of Resources (maps 12, 13a, 13b, 1956); Anthony Island, a Home of the Haidas (1957); Histories, territories and laws of the Kitwancool (1959); The Killer Whale Copper (A Chief’s Memorial to His Son (1960); Preserving British Columbia’s Prehistory. Archaeological Sites Advisory Board (1961); Indian History of British Columbia: The Impact of the White Man (1965); Thoughts on the Nootka Canoe (1965); Arts of the Raven: Masterworks by the Northwest Coast Indians (1967); Indians before the arrival of the white men, the Indians after the arrival of the white men (1967); Indians of British Columbia: Selected Bibliography (1968); Totem Pole Survey of Southeastern Alaska (1969); Bibliography of Anthropology of B.C. (1973); and Images Stone B.C. Thirty Centuries of Northwest Coast Indian sculpture (1975). In 1996, Bird of paradox: the unpublished writings of Wilson Duff was published.

Wilson Duff died August 8, 1976 leaving behind his wife, Marion and his two children, Marnie and Tom. In 1981, “The World is as Sharp as a Knife: An Anthology in Honor of Wilson Duff” was published by the British Columbia Provincial Museum and contained essays, reminisces, artwork, and poetry celebrating Duff’s accomplishments, research and friendships.

Wollaston, F.E.R

  • Person
  • [ca.18-?] - 1953

According to his obituary (from the Vernon News, February 19 1953), Francis Edward Richmond Wollasten was an English immigrant who arrived in the Okanagan in the 1890’s. He started work at the Coldstream Ranch in Vernon, B.C. in 1914, and held the position of manager of the Ranch from 1918 until 1939. He passed away in Victoria B.C. in 1953.

Deirdre Lott

  • Person
  • [19--] -

Biographical information not available.

Beverley Brown

  • 17
  • Person
  • 1930 - [ca. 200-]

Eva Beverley Brown (nee. Mason) was born March 11, 1930 in Bella Bella, B.C. For seven and a half years beginning in 1937 or 1938, she was a student at the St. Michael’s Residential School in Alert Bay. After leaving St. Michael’s in 1944 or 1945, Beverley attended Langley High School. In 1949, she married Wallace Percy Brown, another former student at St. Michael’s. They lived in Bella Bella until 1960, when they moved to Vancouver.

Michael M. Ames

  • Person
  • 1933 - 2006

Michael McLean Ames was born in Vancouver in 1933. He graduated from UBC with a B.A. in Anthropology in 1956, and from Harvard University with a Ph.D. in Social Anthropology in 1961. Ames also studied at the University of Michigan, University of London, and the University of Chicago between 1957 and 1962. He taught at McMaster University from 1962 to 1964, and in 1964 he began working at the University of British Columbia (UBC) as an assistant professor, followed by an associate professorship in 1966 and full professorship in 1970. In 1974 he became Director of the UBC Museum of Anthropology (MOA). From 1974 to 1976 Ames was president of the Shastri Indo-Canadian Institute which was established in 1968 with funding from the Indian Government to promote Indian studies in Canada. Ames retired from MOA in 1997, and received professor emeritus status in 1998. He remained involved with the Anthropology department at UBC, co-teaching undergraduate courses such as Humanities 101 on Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside, chairing the Dean of Arts First Nations Language Programme advisory committee, and helping to institute the Musqueam 101 seminar at Musqueam. In July 2002, Ames returned to MOA as Acting Director until 2004. Michael Ames passed away in February, 2006.

Ames received the Simon Guggenheim Fellowship in 1970, was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 1979, and a Fellow of the Society for Applied Anthropology in 1996. He was appointed a Member of the Order of Canada in 1998. Ames also received the UBC Alumni Award of Distinction in 2005.

Ames published an extensive number of articles and books on a range of subjects including South Asian anthropology, First Nations issues, and museology.

William Carr

  • Person

William Carr was a resident of California who took a boat trip through the Strait of Georgia around 1949-50. In 1995 he donated two rolls of black and white 35 mm film to the Museum shot during this trip for their historical value and possible educational use by First Nations communities.

Walter C. Koerner

  • Person
  • 1898 - 1995

Walter C. Koerner was born in what is now known as Czechoslovakia (formerly part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire). In 1939, fleeing the expansion of Nazi Germany, he left Europe and emigrated to Canada. Upon his arrival in British Columbia, Koerner, with members of his family, founded a company known as Alaska Pine. He became a major figure in British Columbia's forest industry. Koerner was a significant collector of art, most notably European ceramics and North American First Nations art. In 1941, Koerner began collecting Northwest Coast First Nations art. He is credited with making important contributions to the artistic renaissance of First Nations art through his philanthropy and patronage. Walter Koerner played a significant role in the development of the University of British Columbia campus, lending financial and political support to several projects including UBC Library, the University Hospital, and the Museum of Anthropology. Walter Koerner died on his birthday July 21, 1995.

University of British Columbia. Museum of Anthropology. Volunteer Associates

On March 15, 1976, a steering committee was formed to realize a programme of volunteers at the Museum of Anthropology. Sixteen volunteers made up the organizing committee. In April of that year, 34 interested volunteers took part in a general meeting, and the steering committee served as the executive for the following year. Because of the Museum of Anthropology's relocation from the library's north wing to its present location, the steering committee was initially primarily concerned with tasks related to the official opening ceremonies for the opening of the new museum in May of 1976. In 1977, the official policy for the Volunteer Associates was put in place. Originally the volunteer associates were known as the Friends of the Museum, but ca. 1979, the volunteer committee changed their name to better reflect their commitment to the Museum. The purpose of the Volunteer Associates is to provide assistance and services to the Museum of Anthropology and members of the public, and to provide a fulfilling experience for the volunteers. The Volunteer Associates are a self-administered organization with an executive committee working closely with the director and staff members. The organization is made up of committees, and members' work with the head of their committee who in turn coordinates activities with a staff member.

Virgina Lade

  • Person

No biographical information available.

Victoria Yip

  • Person

Victoria Yip joined the Chinese Times in Vancouver in 1929 and was responsible for local Vancouver and Canadian news. She was also the part-time editor for the cultural and literary columns and she later assumed the role of Advertising Manager.

Mildred Laurie

  • Person

Thomas Laurie and Mildred Laurie were a married couple who managed the B.C. Packers general store in Alert Bay for many years. Their daughters Leslie and Cathie attended the first local integrated school there in the 1950s, and their son Tom was born in Alert Bay in 1962. After leaving Alert Bay in 1964 the family moved to Powell River, where Thomas and Mildred ran the Columbia Store, and then to Ocean Falls, where they managed the mill store. The Lauries later relocated to Kitimat and then to Prince George, where they ran a motel for 22 years.

Laurie family

  • Family
  • 1912 - 2008

Thomas Laurie and Mildred Laurie were a married couple who managed the B.C. Packers general store in Alert Bay for many years. Their daughters Leslie and Cathie attended the first local integrated school there in the 1950s, and their son Tom was born in Alert Bay in 1962. After leaving Alert Bay in 1964 the family moved to Powell River, where Thomas and Mildred ran the Columbia Store, and then to Ocean Falls, where they managed the mill store. The Lauries later relocated to Kitimat and then to Prince George, where they ran a motel for 22 years.

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