Affichage de 307 résultats

fichier d'autorité

Percy Broughton

  • Personne
  • [18-]-1915

Percy Broughton was a missionary of the Anglican Church who served the Church Missionary Society (predecessor to the Anglican Church in the Arctic) at Lake Harbour [Kimmirut, Baffin Island] from 1911-1912. Prior to this, Broughton attended the theological school Wycliffe College in Toronto, Ontario. Broughton arrived in Lake Harbour in September of 1911. In March of 1912, he was separated from the Inuit crew he was travelling with, and spent two days lost in the Arctic. He eventually managed to find his way to a small community of Inuit who saved his life though he sustained serious injuries due to prolonged exposure in extreme cold temperatures. He left Lake Harbour in August of 1912. Broughton returned to Toronto for surgeries and recuperation, then went to England, New Zealand, and Australia. Broughton died, most likely due to complications from his injuries, in September of 1915.

Bill Holm

  • Personne

Charles S. Brant

  • Personne
  • 1919 - 1991

Charles S. Brant was born in Portland, Oregon in 1919. A life-long anthropologist, Brant began his academic career at Reed College where he obtained a B.A. 1941. In 1943, Brant completed his M.A. requirements at Yale University, where he was also University Scholar from 1941-1943. From 1943-1946 Brant served in the U.S. Army as part of the Medical Administration in India and China. With the support of Wenner-Gren and Fulbright awards, Brant undertook pre-doctoral research in the United States and Burma before completing his Ph.D. at Cornell University in 1951.

In the early years of his career, Brant taught at University of Michigan (1947-1948), Colgate University (1951-1952), University of California (1952-1953), and Sarah Lawrence College (1954-1956). Brant was also resident anthropologist at Albert Einstein College from 1956-1957. In 1957, Brant joined Portland State University as Assistant Professor. Brant moved to Canada in 1961 to take the position of Assistant Professor at the University of Alberta, and obtained Canadian citizenship six years later. Brant became head of the Department of Anthropology at the University of Alberta in 1963, and also directed the University’s Boreal Institute for Northern Studies from 1964-1967. In 1970, Brant left Alberta for Montreal to join the faculty at Sir George Williams University (now Concordia) as professor. Brant spent the last 12 years of his career there, retiring from teaching in 1982.

Brant is best known for his work on the Kiowa Apache through his book Jim Whitewolf: The Life of a Kiowa Apache Indian, originally published in 1969. In addition to his work on North American Native peoples and cultures, Brant had research interests in social organization and change in India and China; social change in Arctic regions (especially as it applied to Canada and Greenland); and in the problems of developing countries. During his career, Brant completed fieldwork in Burma, Greenland, the Canadian Arctic, and in Native American communities in California and Oklahoma.

Brant and his wife Jane were both photographers and life-long social activists. They had two sons. After his retirement in 1982, Brant moved to Gabriola Island, British Columbia. Brant passed away in 1991 at age 71 in Nanaimo, British Columbia.

Edward F. Meade

  • Personne
  • 1912 - 2005

Edward Meade was born in Winnipeg and moved in 1930 to Vancouver Island, where he began studying the First Nations of the Pacific Coast. After serving overseas as a platoon commander during the Second World War, Meade returned to British Columbia to settle in Campbell River. There he founded the Campbell River Historical Museum in 1949, and volunteered as the Museum’s Curator for many years. Also while living in Campbell River, Meade became a reporter for the Comox District Free Press.

Although Meade was not a professional anthropologist, he did spend a significant amount of time traveling up and down the Pacific coast studying the history of various First Nations and collecting artifacts, and was considered something of an expert in the field. The UBC Museum of Anthropology purchased several artifact collections from him. He developed a particular interest in petroglyphs, and spent approximately ten years accumulating as much information as he could about petroglyph sites from Puget Sound to the Alaskan coast. This study resulted in his book Indian Rock Carving of the Pacific Northwest, published in [ca. 1971]. In addition to this book, Meade also published numerous articles on Pacific Northwest First Nations, and a war novel entitled Remember Me. In 1965, Remember Me was published as a paperback for the New Canadian Library series by McClelland & Stewart. In 1980, Meade self-published a biography entitled Biography of Dr. Samuel Campbell, R.N., Surgeon and Surveyer: Including the Naming and Early History of the Campbell River.

Hugh Campbell-Brown

  • Personne

Hugh Campbell-Brown was a medical doctor in Vernon, B.C., whose father was a missionary doctor in China. The father of Campbell-Brown assembled a collection of coins that date from 255 B.C. to 1910, and the Museum of Anthropology acquired these coins from Hugh Campbell-Brown in the early 1980s.

Margaret Stott

  • Personne

Margaret Stott served as the Curator of Ethnology and Education at the University of British Columbia's Museum of Anthropology from 1979-1990. Stott's duties included public programs, education, and curator activities. Stott also gave teacher and museum workshops as well as teaching anthropology classes at the University of British Columbia. Margaret Stott obtained her Bachelor of Arts from the University of British Columbia in 1966. In 1969, Stott received her Master in Anthropology at McGill University. From 1969 to 1972, she served as archivist at the National Museum of Man in Ottawa and from 1973 to 1975, she worked as the Anthropology Exhibits Coordinator for the Museum of Man. From 1979 to 1990, Stott served as the Curator of Ethnology at UBC's Museum of Anthropology. Meanwhile in 1982, Stott obtained her PhD in Social Anthropology from the University of London. In 1990, Margaret Stott completed the Foundation Programme in Tourism Management at Simon Fraser University. From 1979 onwards, Stott also worked as a museum consultant. Major exhibitions curated or coordinated by Margaret Stott include: "'Ksan: Breath of Our Grandfathers", a travelling exhibition of the National Museum of Man 91972-1973); "Ontario Prehistory", a travelling exhibition of the National Museum of Man (1973); "Athapaskan Peoples: Strangers of the North", an exhibition prepared by the National Museum of Man and the Royal Scottish Museum (1973-1975); "Objects from Northwest Coast Indian Cultures", a touchable exhibit for visually handicapped at the UBC Museum of Anthropology (1979-1980); "Kwaqiutl Echo Dance Costume" for the Guaranteed Trust Company (1980); "Northwest Coast Indian Art", a display in the Air Canada Maple Leaf Lounge at Vancouver International Airport (1980 onwards); "Form, Manufacture, Function, and Meaning" exhibited at MOA (1981-1982); "Art of the Northwest Coast Indians" was an exhibition for the UBC Hospital (1983); "O Canada!" at MOA (1984); "Blue Jeans" at MOA (1985); "To market, to market...the culture exchange", an exhibition about tourism and art at MOA (1989); and a Nuxalk exhibit (untitled) of the Canadian Museum of Civilization. Stott also worked on a number of audio-visual productions. "MOA Presents" consists of 8 half-hour productions for cable and educational television networks in British Columbia 1980-1981. "MOA Presents Series 2", consists of 6 half-hour programs for the Knowledge Network, public programming in British Columbia 1981-1982. "A Curator's Guide to MOA", a 30-minute audio tour tape, was produced in 1983. Stott is credited with a number of published independent and collaborative articles. Some of these titles include "Guide to the UBC Museum of Anthropology", "Bella Coola Ceremony and Art". Among her published journal articles: "Economic Transition and the Family in Mykonos, Greece"; "Video Disc: Museums and the Future"; "Object, Context, and Process: Approaches to Teaching about Material Culture".

University of British Columbia. Museum of Anthropology. Public Relations and Communications Office

  • Collectivité
  • 1982 - 1990

From 1978 to 1981, the functions of the Public Relations and Communications Office, including public programming and public relations activities, were fulfilled by the museum’s Extension Curator.

In 1982, Ruth Anderson was appointed Public Relations Coordinator. In 1985, the position was re-titled Public Relations Officer. In January 1986, Christopher Miller took over the position of Public Relations Officer. In 1987, the position’s title was changed to Public Relations and Development Officer, and was changed again in March 1990 to Public Relations and Marketing Officer.

In October, 1990, the functions of the Public Relations Office were assumed by the newly created Communications Office, headed by Kersti Krug, Director of Communications. From 1994 to 1998, Anna Pappalardo held this position and in 1998 Jennifer Webb took over. During Webb's time the Public and Community Services Department was created, and in 2006 the position was renamed Communications Manager. Webb held this position until 2013. This management position has often been supported by one or more assistants.

The Public Relations and Communications Office was established to increase the public’s awareness of the Museum of Anthropology and to promote its programs and special events. Functioning as an intermediary between the museum and the public, the Office is responsible for developing the public image of the museum. To achieve these functions, the Communications Manager is responsible for developing and maintaining media contacts, holding press conferences, writing press releases, advertising and producing publications about the museum, its programs, events, and services, building relationships with tour guides and hotel operators, and developing techniques for increasing museum attendance. In addition, the Manager is also responsible for coordinating fundraising and promotional events, conducting VIP visits, and representing the museum on various committees and at community events. Historically, this position has also been responsible for administering the museum’s Print Out Art Loan program and acting as a liaison for the Gallery Guides program.

R.A. Brooks

  • Personne

R.A. Brooks was a Vancouver resident who had a curio shop for a number of years. He died c. 1949 and his collection of stone heads – ‘Brooks heads’ – were offered for sale in his shop by his widow, Mrs. Mabel Orr Brooks. Brooks had apparently collected the stones over a number of years from a mound near the Fraser River

Richard Cotton

  • Personne

Richard Cotton was stationed in Terrace, BC in the 1960s.

Stephen Inglis

  • Personne
  • 1949 -

Dr. Stephen Inglis was born in 1949. He has a BA and a PhD (1984) in Anthropology from UBC. He received an MA in Museology and Indian Art from Calcutta University. Dr. Inglis was a guest curator for the MOA exhibit “Calendar Prints: Popular Art of South India” which was displayed at the Museum from September 1983 to January 1985. He is currently the Director General of Research and Collections at the Canadian Museum of Civilization (CMC). Dr. Inglis specializes in artists and their communities, particularly in South Asia.

Résultats 1 à 20 sur 307