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Victor Othello dos Remedios

  • Pessoa
  • 1893-1981

Victor Othello dos Remedios was born in Macau in 1893. He spent most of his life in Shanghai, China until 1951. He was trained as an accountant and worked for most of his adult years at the Hong Kong & Shanghai Bank of Commerce and at an American-owned pulp and paper mill. He married his first wife at the age of twenty-four and had a son who developed polio and was sent to Switzerland for schooling and health care. He married again at about the age of forty and had a daughter in 1938. At age fourteen he registered in the Shanghai Volunteer Corps and served until 1942 when war broke out. He took photographs of two bombing incidents in Shanghai in the 30s as a member of the Corps. In 1942, Victor along with his wife Valentina and daughter Elizabeth were interned at one of many of the camps set up by the occupying Japanese forces in Shanghai for expatriates. They were released in April 1945 and had no place to live as their house was occupied by Korean allies of the Japanese, so they remained for another year in the camp.
The family eventually repossessed their home and Victor resumed work at his previous job as a manager of the pulp and paper mill. With the impending threat of invasion by the recently formed Red Army, his wife and daughter were sent to Hong Kong to live with relatives. Victor stayed in Shanghai until he had trained a Chinese replacement to manage the mill. In 1950, he was able to join his family and after a short stay in Hong Kong the family immigrated to Canada. In 1981, Victor passed away in a care facility in Victoria, BC. As of March 2014, his wife Valentina still lives in Victoria.

Audrey Patricia Mackay Shane

  • Pessoa
  • 1922 -

Audrey Patricia MacKay Shane was born on August 27, 1922 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. She received a diploma in Interior Design from the University of Manitoba in 1942 and worked for the Department of Architecture and Fine Arts at the University for the next three years. In the period between 1962 and 1970, she served in voluntary roles such as secretary of the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra and treasurer of the Manitoba Archaeological Society. In 1974, Shane received her Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology from the University of British Columbia (UBC). A year later, she was hired as Archivist/Librarian at the Museum of Anthropology, a position she held until she was appointed Curator of Documentation in 1979. As Archivist/Librarian, Shane was responsible for the documentation of the Museum’s collections for inclusion in the National Inventory of Canada as well as for the cataloguing of the collections.

Shane completed her M.A. in Anthropology in UBC in 1978. Her primary interest was in the art and material culture of the northern Northwest Coast, China, Japan and the Insular Pacific before the 20th century. As the Curator of Documentation, Shane’s responsibilities included ensuring the accurate permanent catalogue records were created and maintained for the Museum’s collections, interpreting the Museum’s collections to the public and students through exhibits, publications, university and community teaching, and representing the museum on a local and international level. She taught a series of laboratory sessions in Anthropology 431, Museum Principles and Methods, a course offered by UBC’s Department of Anthropology and also conducted lectures and seminars for the Museum’s volunteers. Shane has written various scholarly articles and presented many papers in numerous conferences. Her published articles include “Sensibilities: Unsuspected Multicultural Harmonies” which appeared in the March/April 1983 issue of Canadian Collector, “Power in Their Hands: the Gitsontk,” which was published in The Tsimshian: Images of the Past Views for the Present and “Networking: the Canadian Experience,” a paper published for the Western Museum Conference in 1983. Shane has also curated a number of exhibitions and served on the Acquisitions and Collections Committees within the Museum. In addition, she was active in committees formed by professional associations such as the British Columbia Museum Association Committee on Legal and Ethical Questions. She also assumed the role of Signing Expert Examiner in Ethnography for the Canadian Cultural Property Export and Import Board. Shane retired from her position at the Museum in 1987.

Bill Reid

  • 1920 - 1998

Haida master goldsmith, carver, sculptor, writer and spokesman.

C. MacKay

Doug Cranmer

  • Pessoa
  • 1927 - 2006

DELETE

  • Família

Public Programming and Education. University of British Columbia. Museum of Anthropology.

  • Entidade coletiva
  • ca. 1971 -

Audrey Hawthorn, as the Museum of Anthropology first official Curator, was the person initially responsible for Public Programming and Education. In Hawthorn’s time the function involved mainly exhibitions and the programs surrounding them, as well as raising the profile of the museum. When plans for a new building got underway more formal programming guidelines were developed. A Museum Programming Committee was formed in 1971, charged with the function of suggesting programmes for the new museum, which was at this time still in the planning phase. Along with other museum committees, this committee was given the task of developing programming ideas to help dictate the needs of the new building. Their mandate was to establish policy guidelines for museum programming.

In 1974 the Museum Public Programming Committee decided on two spheres of programming: academic and public programmes. Since this time, these functions have been shared by different positions with various titles. These position titles include Extension Curator, Education Curator, Museum Programme Coordinator, Public Programming Coordinator and Curator of Public Programmes.

Individuals that have been involved in these functions were often employed full time in the Museum, while others were employed part-time as museum curators and part-time as professors in the Department of Anthropology. These curators have traditionally had a very fluid function and their roles have included many additional responsibilities outside of public programming and education. These individuals include:

-Audrey Hawthorn, Curator (1947-1977)
-Elvi Whittaker, Coordinator of Public Programming (1973-1976)
-Hindaleah (Hindy) Ratner, Extension Curator (1978-1995) (on leave May -October 1984, January-July 1985, and September 1986-February 1987)
-Madeline Bronsdon Rowan, Curator of Ethnology and Public Programming and professor of Anthropology (April 1977-December 1986) (on leave 1979 and 1986)
-Margaret Stott, Curator of Ethnology and Education, and Professor of Anthropology (1979-1990)
-Roberta Kremer, Acting Education Curator (July 1989-June 1991) Acting Curator of Education and Volunteer Coordinator (1990-1991) Acting Education/Public Programming Curator (while Jill Baird was on leave January 2007- January 2008)
-Louise Jackson, Curator of Ethnology and Education (July 1991-1995) (on leave 1993-1995)
-Rosa Ho, Curator of Art and Public Programming (January 1988-1999) Curator of Art and Public Programming and Education (1992, 1996-1999)
-Jill Baird, Education/Public Programming Curator (March 1999-present) (on leave January 2007-January 2008)

Graduate students Margaret Holm and Susan Hull coordinated extension duties and programmes in Rowan and Ratners' absence in 1986 and 1987. There was no official replacement for the Extension or Education Curators during the absence of Rowan and Ratner nor with their resignations in 1986. This continued until Rosa Ho was appointed as the full-time Curator of Art and Public Programming in January 1988. She added Education Curator to her title in 1992 and again after the departure of Jackson in 1996. She held the position of Curator of Art, Public Programming and Education until she left in 1999.

Jill Baird took over the position of Education/Public Programming Curator in March 1999. This new position included the majority of the functions of the Art and Public Programming Curator, as well as the traditional functions of both the Extension and Education Curator and some additional responsibilities.

The function of Public Programming and Education has traditionally been responsible for exhibitions, education, public programs, and extension activities at the Museum of Anthropology. The primary function of this area was to locate cultures within the world context of art, to prepare exhibits, including travelling exhibits, to enhance cultural understanding and enjoyment of cultural diversity, and to cut across the disciplinary boundaries of art history, anthropology, and archaeology. These functions were developed in particular ways for specialized audiences through Exhibitions, Education, Public Programmes, and Extension activities.

The Education function has included establishing and supervising school programmes for students and teachers, and training members of the Volunteer Associates to conduct these programmes. Programmed activities included orientation walks, self-guided visits to the museum, cultural performances, and a variety of participatory sessions designed to complement the school curriculum, this included the development of units of curriculum and "touchable" artifact kits. School artifact kits included specially designed information and artifacts that were packaged and lent out to British Columbia schools to further anthropological education outside of the museum setting. The education programming also provided professional development workshops for teachers and students.

Public Programmes included artists' talks and panel discussions, storytelling, music, performances, workshops, lectures, non-credit courses, museum tours, identification clinics and audio-visual presentations.

Extension activities included the loaning out of exhibit materials and creation of travelling exhibitions. This included coordinating the development of in-house exhibitions, special events and lectures in conjunction with exhibits, exhibits in office spaces, and installations in off-campus locations.

The Museum's current public programming mandate, as of 1999, seeks to provide a forum for cultural expression, experimentation, and exchange of views. This is done through a variety of programs, including public talks, demonstration, guided gallery tours, lectures, hands-on workshops, artist talks, music, performances, film viewing and educational programs.

The Museum's current educational programming mandate is to develop and deliver quality programs to elementary and secondary school students that introduces them to other cultures and makes innovative use of the Museum's collections, exhibitions, and other resources. These programs include elementary and secondary classes, special programs developed in conjunction with temporary exhibitions, the Musqueam School, and summer day camps. Many of the educational programs are jointly developed with artists and other institutions.

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