Showing 310 results

authority records

Edward C. Dunn

  • Person

Biographical information unavailable.

Ewen MacLeod

  • Person
  • 1881 - 1931

Ewen MacLeod was born in Scotland in 1881 and immigrated to Canada around 1903. After getting married in 1911 and working for the BC Provincial Police in Clayoquot, BC, he moved with his family to Lytton, BC in 1915 to work as a Farm Instructor and Indian Constable. Around 1920 he was promoted to Indian Agent for the Lytton area, a post he occupied until his death in a car accident on September 27, 1931.

Frederich H. Maude

  • Person
  • 1858 - 194-

Frederich H. Maude was born in 1858 in England, and died in the mid 1940s in California. According to family legend, Maude was smuggled out of England in a frantic attempt to escape the police, although what crime he had committed is not known. Maude settled in California, where he became a beach photographer and eventually started his own business.

Harry Bertram Hawthorn

  • Person
  • 1910 - 2006

Harry B. Hawthorn was born in Wellington, New Zealand in 1910. He completed his B.Sc (1932) and M.Sc. (1934) with the intention of becoming a civil engineer. During the Depression Hawthorn worked for New Zealand's Native School Service. Unable to pursue his studies in science in the small communities in which he worked, he became interested in the humanities, studying history extra-murally. He earned his B.A. in 1937. The years spent in the Native School Service had an arguably strong influence on Hawthorn. He was offered and accepted a fellowship to study anthropology at the University of Hawaii in 1938. The following year he was offered another fellowship to study anthropology at Yale University where he completed his PhD in 1941. While there he met Audrey Engel who later became his wife.

Hawthorn's appointment to the faculty of the University of British Columbia in 1947 added Anthropology to the title of the Dept. of Economics, Political Science and Sociology. His objectives upon coming to UBC were to: establish his discipline in an academic setting of the University and in the Province; to offer anthropology as a contribution to the general education of a broad group of students and to begin the selection and training of a few specialists; to establish problems for ethnological research; and, in keeping with conviction that scholarship should be useful as well as decorative, to discover possibilities for the practical application of anthropology in the Province and the country.

In 1949, Hawthorn was asked by the Provincial Government to undertake a study of the problems confronting Doukhobors in British Columbia. He assembled a team of scholars from various disciplines to investigate different aspects of the issue. The subsequent report (1955), helped to ameliorate the Doukhobors and encouraged increased cooperation among the Doukhobors, non-Doukhobors and the government. It also proved to be a valuable experience for members of the research team. In 1954, the Department of Citizenship and Immigration commissioned a comprehensive study of B.C. Indians. Hawthorn again assembled a research team which completed its study in 1956. In that same year Anthropology, Sociology and Criminology separated from Economics and Political Science to form a new department with Hawthorn as its head, a position which he held until 1968. Hawthorn undertook direction of a third large-scale interdisciplinary research project in 1963 -- The Survey of Contemporary Indians of Canada (1966, 1967). The project not only influenced the development of native affairs in Canada but also contributed to development of Canadian anthropology by providing practical and research experience for a number of young scholars.
In addition to the above-described activities, Hawthorn and his wife Audrey also played a significant role in the development of the UBC Museum (later the Museum of Anthropology) and, in particular, the development of an outstanding collection of West Coast native artifacts.
Hawthorn served as a member of the UBC faculty until his retirement in 1976. He died in 2006.

Helen Frances Codere

  • Person
  • 1917 - 2009

Helen Frances Codere was born on September 10, 1917, in Winnipeg, Manitoba, but moved to Minnesota in 1919. In 1939, she received her BA from the University of Minnesota, and in 1950 she completed her Ph.D. in Anthropology at Columbia University, where she studied under Ruth Benedict, a protégé of Franz Boas. Codere held appointments at a variety of academic institutions including Vassar University (1946-1953) and Brandeis University (1964 1982), where she was also dean of the graduate school from 1974-1977. At other times she held appointments at the American Ethnological Society, the University of British Columbia, Northwestern University, Bennington College, and the University of Pennsylvania.

Codere’s early work focused on the Kwakwaka’wakw. She carried out field studies in 1951 and 1955 and, in 1950, published Fighting with Property: Study of the Kwakiutl Potlatching and Warfare, 1792-1930. In 1959, Codere traveled to Rwanda to study social structures and relationships between the Tutsis and Hutus, and in 1973 published The Biography of an African Society: Rwanda 1900-1960. In 1966, she edited Boas’s unpublished manuscript, Kwakiutl Ethnography.

Helen Codere died in 2009.

Ken Kuramoto

  • Person

Ken Kuramoto was contracted by the Museum of Anthropology in 1980 to produce the film Celebration of the Raven. At this time, Kuramoto was director of K.K Enterprises.

Mary Tucker

  • Person

No biographical information available.

Sharon Fortney

  • Person
  • [19-?] -

Sharon M. Fortney is an independent curator, researcher, and writer specializing in Coast Salish community projects. Fortney completed her BA in Archaeology at the University of Calgary. She has an MA in Anthropology (2001) and a PhD in Anthropology (2009), both from the University of British Columbia. Her doctoral research examined the status of First Nations community and museum relationships in Canada and the United States. Fortney’s other areas of interest and expertise include ethnography, material culture, memory, and identity. She has published papers and reports on various aspects of First Nations culture, including Pacific Coast Salish Art, Musqueam traditional land use, and Sto:lo basketry. She has worked as a guest curator and researcher for a variety of institutions, including the Museum of Anthropology, the North Vancouver Museum and Archives, the Museum of Vancouver, and the Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art.

Stuart James Schofield

  • Person
  • 1883 - 1947

Stuart Schofield was born in Kent, England. After moving to Kingston, Ontario as a child, he completed his B.A. (1904), M.A. (1906), and B.Sc. (1908) at Queenʹs University. He later completed a Ph.D. at M.I.T. (1912). He began his geological career with the Geological Survey of Canada as a student assistant to R.W. Brock in 1906. In 1915, Schofield accepted Brockʹs invitation to start courses in Geology and Mineralogy at the newly‐established University of British Columbia. He was appointed professor of Structural Geography at the university in 1920. After accepting responsibility for making a geological survey of Hong Kong in 1906, Brock sent Schofield to undertake a general reconnaissance for six months. Ill health forced Schofield to retire from UBC in 1940; he died in Vancouver in 1947.

Mildred Laurie

  • Person

Thomas Laurie and Mildred Laurie were a married couple who managed the B.C. Packers general store in Alert Bay for many years. Their daughters Leslie and Cathie attended the first local integrated school there in the 1950s, and their son Tom was born in Alert Bay in 1962. After leaving Alert Bay in 1964 the family moved to Powell River, where Thomas and Mildred ran the Columbia Store, and then to Ocean Falls, where they managed the mill store. The Lauries later relocated to Kitimat and then to Prince George, where they ran a motel for 22 years.

University of British Columbia. Museum of Anthropology. Volunteer Associates

On March 15, 1976, a steering committee was formed to realize a programme of volunteers at the Museum of Anthropology. Sixteen volunteers made up the organizing committee. In April of that year, 34 interested volunteers took part in a general meeting, and the steering committee served as the executive for the following year. Because of the Museum of Anthropology's relocation from the library's north wing to its present location, the steering committee was initially primarily concerned with tasks related to the official opening ceremonies for the opening of the new museum in May of 1976. In 1977, the official policy for the Volunteer Associates was put in place. Originally the volunteer associates were known as the Friends of the Museum, but ca. 1979, the volunteer committee changed their name to better reflect their commitment to the Museum. The purpose of the Volunteer Associates is to provide assistance and services to the Museum of Anthropology and members of the public, and to provide a fulfilling experience for the volunteers. The Volunteer Associates are a self-administered organization with an executive committee working closely with the director and staff members. The organization is made up of committees, and members' work with the head of their committee who in turn coordinates activities with a staff member.

Elizabeth Lominska Johnson

  • 1941 -

Elizabeth Lominska Johnson was born in Ossining, New York in 1941. In 1963, she received a B.A. in Psychology from Bucknell University. After receiving this degree she travelled in Europe for a year. In 1965 she married Graham Johnson. In 1967, she received a M.A. in Anthropology from Cornell University. Subsequently Johnson moved to Hong Kong where she lived from 1968 to 1971. Johnson continued to study at Cornell and in 1976 she received a Ph.D. in Anthropology upon completion of her dissertation, "Households and Lineages in an Urban Chinese Village," which is a study of the effects of rapid urbanization upon kinship groups in a two-lineage Hakka village.

In 1974 and 1975 Elizabeth Lominska Johnson was engaged as the "Coordinator, China Resources Project," at the University of British Columbia (UBC). In this position she acted as a liaison between local schools and researchers focusing on China at UBC. In 1977, she was employed as a museum cataloguer on a part-time basis both by MacMillan Bloedel, and by the Museum of Anthropology (MOA). From 1978 to 1979, she was employed as the Public Programmes Coordinator by the Vancouver Museum and Planetarium Association, where she developed, implemented and supervised new courses, social events, and lectures. Since March 1979, she has been an employee of the Museum of Anthropology. Until August 1986, she was Curator of Collections. In this position Johnson was responsible for the intellectual and administrative control of artifacts in the museum’s collection through registration, conservation, loan procedures; development of policy and procedures, the planning a new textile storage system, providing collections information to the public and the creation of publications relating to the collection.

Since August of 1986, she held the position of Curator of Ethnology. Several of her responsibilities continued to the new position, including curatorial activities and development of policies and procedures. New responsibilities included: teaching the course "Museum Principles and Methods" in Anthropology as well as occasional courses in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, the maintenance of collections documentation, maintenance and development of museum archives, managing public access to archives and supervising archival workers, appraising artifacts where required for accessioning or income tax receipts, maintaining financial records on the collections curating and coordinating exhibits, as well as taking on curatorial initiatives to develop and promote the East Asian collections in specific and the world-wide textile collection in general. In 1988, the responsibility for the MOA Archives was transferred to Johnson from Audrey Shane. Subsequently, in 1999 responsibility for the archives was transferred to the newly hired museum archivist.

Johnson’s work however was not restricted to the tasks required by her various positions at the museum. Johnson has also published works suitable for academic, museum and public audiences. These publications include exhibit catalogues, articles and book reviews. She has been active in community and professional associations, including: the Canadian Museums Association; the British Columbia Museums Association; the Royal Asiatic Society, Hong Kong Branch; the Association for Asian Studies; the Archives Association of British Columbia; the Textile Society of Hong Kong; and the Canadian Asian Studies Association. She has regularly attended and participated in conferences, where she has presented papers on such diverse topics as Chinese ethnology, textile conservation, museum studies, archives, the development of curatorial partnerships, visible storage, textiles, repatriation, and Cantonese opera. Apart from her involvement with conferences Johnson has also been an active participant in the academic and museum communities at an international level. Beginning in 1998, she was a grant application assessor for the University Grants Committee in Hong Kong. In the same year she also took on work as an external examiner for the Department of Anthropology at the Chinese University of Hong Kong as well as taking on a position as an advisor to the Hong Kong Heritage Museum. Johnson was also highly involved in the local Vancouver community. From 1983 to 1995 she was a member of the Chinatown Historic Area Planning Committee in Vancouver. Beginning in 1998, she was also a member of the Vancouver Chinese Cultural Centre Museum and Archives Committee. In the fall of 2006 Johnson officially retired, though she continues to maintain her relationship with the Museum of Anthropology in a research capacity.

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