Mostrando 85 resultados

Archival description
Frederich H. Maude fonds
Imprimir vista previa Ver :

81 resultados con objetos digitales Muestra los resultados con objetos digitales

Donation letter

Series consists of a letter written by May Ashurrtt to Museum Director Michael Ames on October 31, 1977. The letter provides details of the donated photographs and the life of Frederich H. Maude, the photographer.

Frederich H. Maude fonds

  • 47
  • Fundo
  • [189-?], 1977

Fonds consists of 71 black and white photographs of the Hopi, the Zuni, and Inscription Rock. The fonds is divided into threes series: Donation Letter (1977), Hopi Images [189-?], and Zuni and Inscription Rock Images [189-?].

Frederich H. Maude

Zuni men making shell necklaces

Photograph depicts two Zuni (A:shiwi) men identified as Dick and his brother-in-law making shell necklaces. A note on the back of the photograph describes how Dick is using a Zuni drill and his brother-in-law is rubbing down the rough edges of the shell beads on a flat stone.

Zuni Children

Photograph depicts three Zuni (A:shiwi) children, sitting on a wooden ladder, likely in the Zuni Pueblo in New Mexico.

Inscription on El Morro

Photograph depicts A'ts'ina ("place of writing on the rock" in Zuni) in El Morro, New Mexico. The site is also referred to as the El Morro National Monument or Inscription Rock, and consists of a sandstone promonotory upon which travelers for several centuries have left inscriptions. The inscriptions shown in this photograph include names and dates from the mid 19th century, as well as an inscription in an unknown language.

Remains of Ancient Pueblo at Top of El Morro

Photograph depicts a stone wall that Maude has identified as the remains of ancient pueblo on top of El Morro, New Mexico. He is likely referring to the El Morro National Monument, a great standstone promontory. The site is also known as A'ts'ina ("place of writing on the rock" in Zuni) or Inscription Rock because of inscriptions that travellers have left on the rocks for several centuries.

View Looking East from Top of El Morro, N.M.

Photograph depicts what Maude refers to as the view from the top of El Morro, New Mexico. He is likely referring to the El Morro National Monument, a great standstone promontory. The site is also known as A'ts'ina ("place of writing on the rock" in Zuni) or Inscription Rock because of inscriptions that travellers have left on the rocks for several centuries.

Top of El Morro, N.M.

Photograph depicts a rocky cliff formation, with a lone figure sitting on the edge, which Maude has identified as El Morro. He is likely referring to the El Morro National Monument, a great standstone promontory. The site is known as A'ts'ina ("place of writing on the rock" in Zuni) or Inscription Rock because of inscriptions that travellers have left on the rocks for several centuries.

El Morro

Photograph depicts the base of a rock formation, with grass and trees, which Maude has identified as El Morro. He is likely referring to the El Morro National Monument, a great standstone promontory. The site is known as A'ts'ina ("place of writing on the rock" in Zuni) or Inscription Rock because of inscriptions that travellers have left on the rocks for several centuries.

El Morro or Inscription Rock, N.M.

Photograph depicts a rock formation, taken from below, which Maude has identified as El Morro or Inscription Rock. He is likely referring to the El Morro National Monument, a great standstone promontory. The site is known as A'ts'ina ("place of writing on the rock" in Zuni).

El Morro or Inscription Rock, N.M.

Photograph depicts a large rock formation, taken from below and at a distance, which Maude has identified as El Morro or Inscription Rock. He is likely referring to the El Morro National Monument, a great standstone promontory. The site is known as A'ts'ina ("place of writing on the rock" in Zuni).

View from Top of El Morro, N.M.

Photograph depicts what Maude has referred to as the view from the top of El Morro, showing a large rocky outcropping, with a grassy landscape in the distance. He is likely referring to the El Morro National Monument, a great standstone promontory. The site is known as A'ts'ina ("place of writing on the rock" in Zuni) or Inscription Rock.

Rock Wall

Photograph depicts a rock wall, likely at A'ts'ina ("place of writing on the rock" in Zuni), also known as El Morro National Monument or Inscription Rock, in El Morro, New Mexico.

Resultados 1 a 20 de 85