Print preview Close

Showing 131 results

Archival description
Series
Print preview View:

2 results with digital objects Show results with digital objects

Video Recordings

Series consists of the video recordings about, by, or related to the Museum of Anthropology. Video recordings can be found in many collections and fonds in the MOA Archives; the recordings in this General Media collection are those that do not belong to a more specific archival collection, usually because their provenance is not known.

Series divided into the following files:

  1. MOA Presents
  2. Movie Footage
  3. Museum of Anthropology
  4. Native Art and Culture
  5. School Programmes
  6. Television Broadcasts
  7. Archaeology
  8. Exhibits
  9. Native Fishing
  10. Films
  11. MOA Collections
  12. Miscellaneous

See attached pdf document for list of recordings.

University of Ibadan Community Studies

The research reports were written by students of the Department of Education at the University of Ibadan. Reports cover studies of various communities is western Nigeria. Collection also includes two books published by Jack Lieber, and a piece of correspondence sent to him.

University of British Columbia (UBC) series

Series consists of photographs documenting totem pole raising or restoration and other events held at the University of British Columbia (UBC) Museum of Anthropology (MOA).

In 1976 Jensen was hired by MOA to document the installation of totem poles into the new building.  Jensen did not keep the negatives for these photographs (MOA did in this instance).  She was hired again in 1981 to create a slide loop of images to be featured in the museum.  After working with the museum, she felt welcome there and often gave talks or did training.  Most of the subsequent photographs in this series were taken at public events such as book launches or pole raisings.

UBC, museum & artist records

Series consists of images related to the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, BC and the Museum of Anthropology (MOA). Focus is on photographic representations of First Nations artists and artwork, including MOA installations and exhibits by Robert Davidson, Jr., Sharon Hitchcock, Henry Hunt, Gerry Marks, Rufus Moody, Norm Tait, and Francis Williams. Series also includes images of installations for the National Museum of Ethnology in Osaka, Japan. Files are generally arranged chronologically according to artist and/or subject matter. Except where noted with square brackets, the titles for files and items in this series were taken from annotations on the original material.

Anthony Carter

UBC and anthropological research

Files in this series relate to the various roles Harry Hawthorn has fulfilled at the University of British Columbia as an anthropologist, a professor (and later head of the Anthropology department), and as the first Director of the Museum of Anthropology. This series consists of correspondence, slides, photographs, negatives and research notes.

The correspondence files primarily relate to the general administration of the Museum of Anthropology by Dr. Hawthorn, including correspondence related to the museum’s collections, potential acquisitions, museum funding, the official name of the museum and the establishment of a new site for the museum. Additionally, there is also correspondence regarding the proposed development of the Indian Historical-Cultural Village, correspondence with other museums, letters asking for Dr. Hawthorn’s expert advice regarding objects, and correspondence with Wilson Duff. Included is correspondence between H. Hawthorn and Bert Robson relating to Hawthorn’s trip in the northeastern region of B.C.

Slides, photographs, negatives and notes relate to the various research trips undertaken by Hawthorn in B.C. from the late 1940s to the late 1950s. Some slides document a totem pole salvage expedition on Anthony Island, B.C. in 1957. Some of these slides were used in the production of George MacDonald’s book, Ninstints: A World Heritage Site. Other slides document miscellaneous events relating to Museum of Anthropology exhibitions and research, as well as other events such as Sports Day on the grounds of the Alberni Residential School and the carving of a 20’ long 2’ wide canoe, which took place at a regatta on May 24, 1948. Series includes negatives of totem poles, stories collected from Mungo Martin and notes, mostly written in an indigenous language.

Tsimshian files

Research notes compiled by Wilson Duff during his work on the Barbeau/Beynon material held at the National Museum of Canada (now Canadian Museum of History). This research, focused specifically on the Tsimshian culture, includes correspondence addressed to and/or written by Duff, files relating to the Nishga Land Claim of which Duff was involved as a witness, and typed manuscripts.

This is Haida records

Series consists of images found in or related to Carter's 1969 published work. Focus is on photographic representations of First Nations communities and individuals throughout Haida Gwaii. Geographic locations include Anthony Island (Ninstins), Masset, Skedans, Skidegate, Tanu and Yan. Series also contains images related to the 1969 Masset pole raising ceremony in honor of Robert Davidson, Jr. Files are generally arranged chronologically according to subject matter and/or locality. Except where noted with square brackets, the titles for files and items in this series were taken from annotations on the original material.

Anthony Carter

Textual materials

Series consists of written X̄a’islak̓ala (Haisla language) documentation and learning materials by the Dutch linguist Hein Vink (also known as Henry Vink). These language materials consist of a dictionary, one beginner course book, and one advanced level Haisla learning course book. The series also contains written tellings of traditional Kitimat stories, as told by Jeffrey Legaic and collected by Gisele Mendel.

Teaching/Training and Research Files

Series consists of published and unpublished articles and papers, draft copies, correspondence and memoranda, minutes, handwritten notations, curriculum vitae, pamphlets, brochures, speech outlines, photographs, and other textual and graphic material related to the director’s teaching, training, and research activities, as well as those of other Museum of Anthropology staff members. Includes records related to the teaching and planning of University of British Columbia credit courses, such as the Museum Studies Certificate program, taught at the museum, as well as records regarding special volunteer training and internship programs at the museum. The series also includes files regarding research and publications by the directors, other Museum of Anthropology staff and individuals not employed by the museum. In addition, the series includes records relating to talks given by the Director of the Museum, as well as a few files related to Michael Ames’ retirement and nominations for various awards.

The series is divided into the following subseries:

A. General Files 1974-1997

B. Planning Files 1974-2005

C. UBC Credit Files 1972-2003

D. Special Training Files 1979-1995, pre-dominant 1991-1995

E. Staff Research, Publications, and Productions Files 1971-2004

F. Non-staff Research, Publication, and Productions Files 1978-2008

G. Talks-Related Files 1971-2004

H. Volunteer Training Files 1979-1991

Teaching materials

Series consists of records created and collected by Duff relating to his work as professor in the Department of Anthropology and Sociology at the University of British Columbia.

Teaching and student files

Series consists of records related to Dr. Halpin’s activities as a professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia. Records include student evaluations of the internship program supervised by Dr. Halpin from 1983-1984 while she was Acting Director of the Museum of Anthropology, permission forms for a student project which Dr. Halpin consulted on, notes on an expansion of the department curriculum, reports, and records related to the source book for ANTH 432 which consists of two pictures, photocopied articles and course bibliography.

Teaching and Research

Series consists of slides representing the inventory of Central Coast Salish art photographed by Dr. Kew during his visits to various North American museums and the British Museum in preparation for the exhibition Visions of Power Symbols of Wealth: Central Coast Salish Sculpture and Engraving. The images illustrate a wide variety of traditional art objects including masks, adzes, spindle whorls, mat creasers, and totems poles, as well as various jewelry, instruments, and utensils. The series also includes two volumes of the Central Coast Salish Computerized Art Inventory, which provides a detailed physical description of each art object.

Tait

Series documents Nisga’a artist Norman Tait and his crew of carvers during a period in which they were prolific in their creation of totem poles.

Jensen first met Tait in the early 1970s when she would photographic artists’ works for Bud Mintz, Vancouver gallery owner.  In 1985 she had the idea to produce a book documenting the carving of a totem pole from start to finish.  She approached Tait, who initially refused but called Jensen back just a few days later to take her up on the offer, after being commissioned to create a pole for the Native Education Centre in Vancouver.

Jensen photographed Tait and his crew, which consisted of his brother Robert (Chip), his cousin Harry Martin (Hammy), his nephew Wayne Young and his eldest son Isaac (Ikey). She also made notes and audio recordings of Tait’s lessons to his crew, most of whom had never worked on such a large project. The photographs and tapes were used in the creation of the book Where the People Gather: Carving a Totem Pole. The project also led to the publication of a children’s version, Carving a Totem Pole and a paperback version titled Totem Pole Carving. The books were published in the early 1990s.

Jensen documented Tait’s next two major commissions: two poles for Capilano Mall in 1986, and a pole for Stanley Park in 1987.

In 1987 Tait adopted Jensen into the Nisga’a Eagle Clan and began to teach her about the responsibilities that came with the honour. The lessons were put into practice in 2001 when Tait asked Vickie to guard the body of a family member that had died.

The series includes photographic records of the creation of the four poles; audio recordings of lessons and interviews with Tait; transcripts of the audio tapes; and notes. The series consists of five sub-series:

A. Native Education Centre (NEC) pole photographs
B. Capilano Mall and Stanley Park poles photographs
C. Misc. photographs
D. Tait family and crew artists’ photographs
E. Audio tapes and transcripts.

Student papers

Series consists of notes and papers written by Duff when he was an anthropology student at UBC.

Student Project files

Series consists of records relating to display units and museum exhibits that were done by students of Anthropology 431 and Anthropology 432 (course titles included Museum Practice and Curatorship, Anthropology of Public Presentation, and Museum Studies and Principles). The records are group assignments that include journals, correspondence, permissions for use, exhibit receipts, exhibit proposals, agreement forms, interview transcripts, research notes, design sketches, invitations, colour samples, samples of mounting materials, colour printouts, negatives, slides and photographs.

The records are divided into the following sub-series:

A Visible Storage 1994
B Gallery Design Concepts 1994
C What Are You Looking At? 1998
D A Break in the Ice 1998-1999
E Who is This Benetton Anyway? 2001
F Koerner Gallery 2001
G Viewpoints 2002
H Celadon: Beyond the Glaze 2003
I Site to Sight: Imaging the Sacred 2004
J The Multiverse Gallery rotational project 2013
K Syllabi and Teaching Files 1999-2013

Special projects

This series consists of records relating to special educational projects carried out by staff responsible for MOA’s public programming and education function, such as the development of exhibits and educational materials such as websites, videos, source books, text and image labels, and project resources. The series contains correspondence, meeting minutes, audio and video recordings, interview transcripts, photographs, internship reports, research trip resource binders, panels, exhibit comment postcards and tags, access handbooks, conference proposals, conference programs, conference reports, publications, and marketing materials.

University of British Columbia. Museum of Anthropology. Public Programming and Education

Sound recordings

Series consists of six sound recordings, digitized from three cassette tapes. Recorded content includes Xa'islakala vocabulary and sentence exercises, along with compiled segments of radio reports and interviews regarding events in and around Kitimat in the 1970s and early 1980s. Recorded language materials are intended to be used as supplementary to the textual course materials.

Results 1 to 20 of 131