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Item Fishing
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Oolachan fishing, Nass River

Image depicts a group of people drying and preparing oolachan (eulachon) fish. Printed around the border of the image is the photographer information "PHOTOGRAPHED BY R. MAYNARD, VICTORIA, . . . B. C." Handwritten inscription on the verso reads "Oolachan fishing, Nass River".

Fraser River salmon

Image is a postcard that depicts a fishery and fishery workers with harvested Salmon in the foreground. Printed inscription below the image reads "Fraser River Salmon. Published by W. T. Cooksley, Photographer, New Westminster, B. C."

Drying Fish

Image depicts a rack set up in a clearing where fish appear to be drying. The area around the rack is scrub land and mountains can be seen in the distance.

River fishing

Image depicts a man standing on a river bank holding a long pole over the river. He appears to have caught a fish and to be bringing it in. A pile of fish sit on the riverbank.

Cowichan salmon weir

Image of a salmon weir on the Cowichan River, Vancouver Island. The weir is seen from a slight distance up or down the river.

Anthony Carter

Cowichan salmon weir

mage of three individuals standing on the platform of a fishing weir on the Cowichan River, holding spears. A similar image is printed on page 15 of Carter's book "From History's Locker," with the caption: "Salmon weir on the Cowichan river, the native people continue a very ancient form of spear fishing for migrating salmon. The weir is not a trap but merely a means to slow the fish on the way up the river."

Anthony Carter

Cowichan salmon weir

Image of a wooden building with a sign hanging from the front of it that says "Salmon for Survival." The building appears to be a place where salmon is processed, dried, and/or sold. It is located next to a creek or low lying river.

Anthony Carter

Cowichan salmon weir

mage of three individuals standing on the platform of a fishing weir on the Cowichan River, holding spears. A similar image is printed on page 15 of Carter's book "From History's Locker," with the caption: "Salmon weir on the Cowichan river, the native people continue a very ancient form of spear fishing for migrating salmon. The weir is not a trap but merely a means to slow the fish on the way up the river."

Anthony Carter

Cowichan salmon weir

mage of three individuals standing on the platform of a fishing weir on the Cowichan River, holding spears. A similar image is printed on page 15 of Carter's book "From History's Locker," with the caption: "Salmon weir on the Cowichan river, the native people continue a very ancient form of spear fishing for migrating salmon. The weir is not a trap but merely a means to slow the fish on the way up the river."

Anthony Carter

Cowichan salmon weir

mage of three individuals standing on the platform of a fishing weir on the Cowichan River, holding spears. A similar image is printed on page 15 of Carter's book "From History's Locker," with the caption: "Salmon weir on the Cowichan river, the native people continue a very ancient form of spear fishing for migrating salmon. The weir is not a trap but merely a means to slow the fish on the way up the river."

Anthony Carter

Cowichan salmon weir

mage of three individuals standing on the platform of a fishing weir on the Cowichan River, holding spears. A similar image is printed on page 15 of Carter's book "From History's Locker," with the caption: "Salmon weir on the Cowichan river, the native people continue a very ancient form of spear fishing for migrating salmon. The weir is not a trap but merely a means to slow the fish on the way up the river."

Anthony Carter