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Vickie Jensen and Jay Powell fonds
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Book 7, tape 2: Learning Kwak'wala

Item consists of a recording of Learning Kwak'wala: Book 7 This One That One, and it features Agnes Cranmer, Margaret Cook, and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer and Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak’wala; Side A: pages 26-40, starts with exercises for buying something that is or is not in sight, and continues with who something is for when they are or are not present, the grammar for doing something and the subject is either present or absent, past tense forms, future tense forms, pointer words, action words without objects, and action words that take objects; Side B: pages 40-57, continues past tense exercises on page 40, and covers how to say and adjective does not apply to someone, when someone is not doing something, the words for very and really, positive and negative answer patterns, grammar to ask what someone is doing, and what someone did in the past. Recorded on both sides.

Book 8, tape 1: Learning Kwak'wala

Item consists of part 1 a recording of Learning Kwak'wala: Book 8 Here & There and it features Agnes Cranmer, Margaret Cook, and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer and Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak’wala; Side A: pages 4-13, and covers singular and plural endings, where someone is going, and where someone went; Side B: pages 14-24, continues how to express where some one is and what they are doing, and covers when someone is going somewhere, and how to tell the time. Recorded on both sides.

Book 8, tape 2: Learning Kwak'wala

Item consists of part 2 of a recording of Learning Kwak’wala: Book 8 Here & There, and it features Agnes Cranmer, Margaret Cook, and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer and Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak’wala; Side A: pages 25-33 covers where people are, when they arrived and where items are, Agnes Cranmer provides another word for Vancouver in Kwak’wala that is not listed on page 27; Side B: pages 33-43 covers the locations of items in or on an object ad provides a distinction between small and larger locations. Recorded on both sides, page numbers in the audio are ahead by one and two page numbers from the physical workbook, and the list of vocabulary is in a slightly different order than the workbook. Recorded on both sides.

Book 9, tape 1: Learning Kwak'wala Series

Item consists of a recording of the Learning Kwak’wala Book 9: Workbook and accompanies Book 6: Saying Everyday Things, and it features Agnes Cranmer, Margaret Cook, and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer and Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak’wala; Side A: pages 4-15; Side B: pages 16-27, 32-33. Recorded on both sides, : Side A stops early near the end of the exercise on page 15; skips game portions of the workbook; Side B stops early halfway through the exercise on page 33. Recorded on both sides.

Book 9, tape 2: Learning Kwak'wala Series

Item consists of a recording of the Learning Kwak’wala book 9: Workbook and accompanies Book 6: Saying Everyday Things, and it features Agnes Cranmer, Margaret Cook, and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer and Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak’wala; Side A: pages 33-57, continues from the rest of the exercise on page 33, and skips the game portions of the workbook. While Jay Powell says that the answers for the game portions are on side B, no audio was recorded on that side. Recorded on Side A, no sound on Side B.

Chinook Jargon

Series is made up of records relating to the creation of a Chinook Jargon dictionary, a Big Book created for the Quileute on Chinook Jargon, and lessons for a Chinook Jargon class at Langara College. Powell documented the use of Chinook Jargon in LaPush during research on the Quileute language. His informants used Chinook Jargon regularly, and he began to research the history of its use on the Northwest Coast with the intention of writing a book about it. The manuscript for his book was accepted by the publishing company Douglas and McIntyre, but as Powell was not satisfied with his work, publication did not take place. However, he did produce a number of works that have been used for education purposes in LaPush as well as in British Columbia.

Series comprises six sub-series:
A. Research materials
B. Field notes and correspondence
C. Unpublished manuscript and lessons
D. Chinook Jargon dictionary files

Counting book photographs

Consists of photographs taken for the series of education books called Counting books in the Big Book series. These images were staged specifically for this purpose and included many traditional activities, such as digging for camus bulbs

Dictionary/publications

Consists of Nuu-chah-nulth and Nitinat alphabet sheets; Our World-Our Ways: T’aat’aaqsapa Cultural Dictionary; The Nuu-chah-nulth Dictionary: Roots, Affixes & English Finder List (November 30, 1995); Nuu-chah-nulth Dictionary: Roots and Affix Files (May 1, 1995).

Doreen Jensen

Consists of audio cassettes and transcripts of the photo identification session involving Sue Rowley (curator of public archaeology at the Museum of Anthropology), Vickie Jensen, and Doreen Jensen (Gitksan artist and curator). The session took place over two days, March 12, 2002 and April 9, 2002 with the goal of identifying the events and people in the photographs of Mary Johnson’s bitxw (divorce potlatch).

Eastern Gitksan photographs

Consists of photographs in the form of negatives, prints and slides from Jensen’s visit to the Gitksan villages in 1975, and from Jensen and Powell’s work and life in the Eastern villages between 1977 – 1982. The images include photographs that were used to illustrate the language books being produced, and other photographs that documented the culture and way of living in these communities.

Field notes

Consists of a number of notebooks of mostly handwritten notes by Powell on the Nuu-chah-nulth language, providing the basis for the printed vocabulary, curriculum, and dictionary developed in this period.

Field notes and research

Consists of notes and research relating to the creation of the books Musqueam Language: Book 1 and Hunq’um’i’num for Kids: Books 1 & 2, as well as research done for the Shalalath Lilooet language and culture program.

Gitksan

Series documents Jensen and Powell’s work with and visits to the Gitksan speaking villages in North Western British Columbia. Jensen and Powell worked with the Gitksan to produce language and culture material.

Jensen’s first visit to Gitksan territory was in 1975, before they began to work with the communities.  Jensen was asked to accompany Dr. Marjorie Halpen of the Museum of Anthropology, Amelia Sussman Schultz (a former student of anthropologist Franz Boas) and UBC grad student Carol Sheehan McLaren to Prince Rupert and various Gitksan villages.  The impetus for the journey was that Schultz was interested in recovering her old dissertation notes that she left with William Beynon, a hereditary Tsimshian chief  who served as ethnographer, translator, and linguistic consultant to anthropologists including Boas. Although she had never completed her dissertation, in her retirement she regretted leaving the information.  During this trip Jensen photographed the Gitksan villages through which they travelled, making special note of the burial houses and totems she encountered.

Two years later the Gitksan band approached Jensen and Powell to create language and culture materials. Powell secured the funding through the BC Ministry of Education and the federal government.

Powell and Jensen lived and worked with the Gitksan in the summers from 1977 to 1981. The first three years were spent focussing on what they have termed the Eastern dialect. In this period they lived and worked in Kispiox, staying in a teacherage the first year (a small apartment built for housing teachers), and moving in the second year to the back room of the house of one of their linguistic informants, Clara Harris. The third year they again lived with Clara Harris until halfway through the summer when they decided to expand the project to include the Western dialect: at this time they moved to Kitwancool (now known as Gitanyow) where they again lived in a teacherage. The final two summers they returned to Kispiox to live with Clara Harris.

Powell worked with a number of linguistic informants, including Clara Harris, Edith Gawa, and Mary Johnson for the Eastern dialect, and Solomon Marsden, with the help of Ivan Good, Maggie Good, Cindy Morgan, Edith and Abel Campbell, David Milton, Olive Mulwain, Fred Johnson and Jeffrey Morgan for the Western. The materials produced throughout the Gitksan project are divided into Eastern and Western Gitksan. The books produced for the Eastern dialect were called Gitksan for Kids. The books for the Western dialect were called Learning Gitksan. In addition to the educational material, other resources were developed including illustrated alphabet sheets, the Northwest Coast Word List (which was intended as the basis for a full dictionary, a goal that did not transpire), and the Gitksan Teacher’s Manual.

As was the case with all the communities they lived in, Powell and Jensen found that work and recreation in small Aboriginal communities blended together, and many of the activities they took part in were incorporated into the language materials produced. Jensen photographed the cultural activities they attended, and they made audio and photographic records of Elders reminiscing about what they referred to as the “old ways.” Both Jensen and Powell were adopted into Gitksan tribes during their time living in the region: Jensen to the Firweed Clan, and Powell to the Lax Gibuu, or Wolf Clan, both of Kispiox. This series comprises all the records created during their stays in Gitksan villages.

The series consists of nine sub-series:
A. Field notes and correspondence
B. Research
C. Published educational materials
D. Unpublished manuscripts
E. Tsimshian-Gitksan materials
F. Eastern and Western Gitksan recordings
G. Eastern Gitksan photographs
H. Western Gitksan photographs
I. Doreen Jensen
J. Gitksan artist photographs

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