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Special projects

This series consists of records relating to special educational projects carried out by staff responsible for MOA’s public programming and education function, such as the development of exhibits and educational materials such as websites, videos, source books, text and image labels, and project resources. The series contains correspondence, meeting minutes, audio and video recordings, interview transcripts, photographs, internship reports, research trip resource binders, panels, exhibit comment postcards and tags, access handbooks, conference proposals, conference programs, conference reports, publications, and marketing materials.

Public Programming and Education. University of British Columbia. Museum of Anthropology.

Photographs

Series consists of photographs, negative and slides documenting activities of the Museum of Anthropology. Most activities took place at the museum, but some took place elsewhere. The activities documented include exhibit openings, exhibit preparation, celebrations, artists working, presentations, conferences, workshops, and notable guests.
Slides in subseries 1-5 are stored in five binders, arranged chronologically. Photographs, negatives and slides in subseries 6-8 are stored in boxes, arranged according to the events they depict. Slides in subseries 9 are stored in a box, arranged topically.

Public Programming and Education. University of British Columbia. Museum of Anthropology.

Chinook Jargon

Series is made up of records relating to the creation of a Chinook Jargon dictionary, a Big Book created for the Quileute on Chinook Jargon, and lessons for a Chinook Jargon class at Langara College. Powell documented the use of Chinook Jargon in LaPush during research on the Quileute language. His informants used Chinook Jargon regularly, and he began to research the history of its use on the Northwest Coast with the intention of writing a book about it. The manuscript for his book was accepted by the publishing company Douglas and McIntyre, but as Powell was not satisfied with his work, publication did not take place. However, he did produce a number of works that have been used for education purposes in LaPush as well as in British Columbia.

Series comprises six sub-series:
A. Research materials
B. Field notes and correspondence
C. Unpublished manuscript and lessons
D. Chinook Jargon dictionary files

Gitksan

Series documents Jensen and Powell’s work with and visits to the Gitksan speaking villages in North Western British Columbia. Jensen and Powell worked with the Gitksan to produce language and culture material.

Jensen’s first visit to Gitksan territory was in 1975, before they began to work with the communities.  Jensen was asked to accompany Dr. Marjorie Halpen of the Museum of Anthropology, Amelia Sussman Schultz (a former student of anthropologist Franz Boas) and UBC grad student Carol Sheehan McLaren to Prince Rupert and various Gitksan villages.  The impetus for the journey was that Schultz was interested in recovering her old dissertation notes that she left with William Beynon, a hereditary Tsimshian chief  who served as ethnographer, translator, and linguistic consultant to anthropologists including Boas. Although she had never completed her dissertation, in her retirement she regretted leaving the information.  During this trip Jensen photographed the Gitksan villages through which they travelled, making special note of the burial houses and totems she encountered.

Two years later the Gitksan band approached Jensen and Powell to create language and culture materials. Powell secured the funding through the BC Ministry of Education and the federal government.

Powell and Jensen lived and worked with the Gitksan in the summers from 1977 to 1981. The first three years were spent focussing on what they have termed the Eastern dialect. In this period they lived and worked in Kispiox, staying in a teacherage the first year (a small apartment built for housing teachers), and moving in the second year to the back room of the house of one of their linguistic informants, Clara Harris. The third year they again lived with Clara Harris until halfway through the summer when they decided to expand the project to include the Western dialect: at this time they moved to Kitwancool (now known as Gitanyow) where they again lived in a teacherage. The final two summers they returned to Kispiox to live with Clara Harris.

Powell worked with a number of linguistic informants, including Clara Harris, Edith Gawa, and Mary Johnson for the Eastern dialect, and Solomon Marsden, with the help of Ivan Good, Maggie Good, Cindy Morgan, Edith and Abel Campbell, David Milton, Olive Mulwain, Fred Johnson and Jeffrey Morgan for the Western. The materials produced throughout the Gitksan project are divided into Eastern and Western Gitksan. The books produced for the Eastern dialect were called Gitksan for Kids. The books for the Western dialect were called Learning Gitksan. In addition to the educational material, other resources were developed including illustrated alphabet sheets, the Northwest Coast Word List (which was intended as the basis for a full dictionary, a goal that did not transpire), and the Gitksan Teacher’s Manual.

As was the case with all the communities they lived in, Powell and Jensen found that work and recreation in small Aboriginal communities blended together, and many of the activities they took part in were incorporated into the language materials produced. Jensen photographed the cultural activities they attended, and they made audio and photographic records of Elders reminiscing about what they referred to as the “old ways.” Both Jensen and Powell were adopted into Gitksan tribes during their time living in the region: Jensen to the Firweed Clan, and Powell to the Lax Gibuu, or Wolf Clan, both of Kispiox. This series comprises all the records created during their stays in Gitksan villages.

The series consists of nine sub-series:
A. Field notes and correspondence
B. Research
C. Published educational materials
D. Unpublished manuscripts
E. Tsimshian-Gitksan materials
F. Eastern and Western Gitksan recordings
G. Eastern Gitksan photographs
H. Western Gitksan photographs
I. Doreen Jensen
J. Gitksan artist photographs

Tait

Series documents Nisga’a artist Norman Tait and his crew of carvers during a period in which they were prolific in their creation of totem poles.

Jensen first met Tait in the early 1970s when she would photographic artists’ works for Bud Mintz, Vancouver gallery owner.  In 1985 she had the idea to produce a book documenting the carving of a totem pole from start to finish.  She approached Tait, who initially refused but called Jensen back just a few days later to take her up on the offer, after being commissioned to create a pole for the Native Education Centre in Vancouver.

Jensen photographed Tait and his crew, which consisted of his brother Robert (Chip), his cousin Harry Martin (Hammy), his nephew Wayne Young and his eldest son Isaac (Ikey). She also made notes and audio recordings of Tait’s lessons to his crew, most of whom had never worked on such a large project. The photographs and tapes were used in the creation of the book Where the People Gather: Carving a Totem Pole. The project also led to the publication of a children’s version, Carving a Totem Pole and a paperback version titled Totem Pole Carving. The books were published in the early 1990s.

Jensen documented Tait’s next two major commissions: two poles for Capilano Mall in 1986, and a pole for Stanley Park in 1987.

In 1987 Tait adopted Jensen into the Nisga’a Eagle Clan and began to teach her about the responsibilities that came with the honour. The lessons were put into practice in 2001 when Tait asked Vickie to guard the body of a family member that had died.

The series includes photographic records of the creation of the four poles; audio recordings of lessons and interviews with Tait; transcripts of the audio tapes; and notes. The series consists of five sub-series:

A. Native Education Centre (NEC) pole photographs
B. Capilano Mall and Stanley Park poles photographs
C. Misc. photographs
D. Tait family and crew artists’ photographs
E. Audio tapes and transcripts.

Publications series

Series consists of books created by or contributed to by Powell and Jensen. Many of the publications are final versions of the language education materials made for community use. A small number are publications on indigenous culture of the Northwest Coast for which Powell and Jensen were consulted, or in which Jensen’s photographs were used.

Series also contains a small number of magazine articles authored by Powell or Jensen.

Student papers

Series consists of notes and papers written by Duff when he was an anthropology student at UBC.

Correspondence

Series consists of letters sent to Duff, occasionally accompanied by articles or manuscripts. There are a few copies of letters from Duff.

Administration, public relations and correspondence

Series consists of records relating to McLennan’s administrative role as a curator at the MOA, including public relations (interviews given, lectures given, publications about the museum and his work), annual reports and correspondence (inquiries from interested parties regarding certain artifacts, events, people and donations at the museum). The majority of this series presents itself in textual records, however there are also digital records included as well. There are a large number of digital images in the file ‘Photographs’ which depict various stages in the museum development of MOA, significant artists, MOA grounds and landscape, special events and visitors and milestone occasions.

Projects and events

Series consists of records created by William McLennan in the course of planning and photographing various projects and events at MOA.

Projects are considered as having a longer duration, often occuring outside of the physical museum building, and in cooperation with other bodies. McLennan often liaised with First Nation communities and artists during the planning stages of projects.

Events are considered as having occurred over a short period of time. Events were attended by McLennan as a MOA representative and photograph.

On both projects and events McLennan took on larger roles in addition to photographer such as community liason, presenting on topics, and designer. Each project and event comprises their own sub-series.

Personal Records

Series consists of records (primarily photographic slides) documenting Minn Sjolseth's travels with her husband Anthony Carter to visit events and communities at locations including Haida Gwaii, Ketchikan, Kitwancool, Kingcome Inlet, Kispiox, Gitsegukla, Kitwanga and Skidegate among others. The contents of the series reflect First Nations cultures in British Columbia throughout the 1960s and 1970s, including Haida, Nuu-Chah-Nulth, Skwxwú7mesh, Nisga'a, Kwakwaka'wakw. The photographs document potlatches, totem poles, villages, landscapes, as well as portraits of individuals. The series also contains files with a small number of photographs documenting Sjolseth's paintings on these subjects, as well as Sjolseth at work on her art on location in these communities and locations.

Artworks

Series consists of artworks created by Minn Sjolseth from the 1970s to the 1980s. These artworks include intaglio prints, pen and ink drawings, charcoal drawings, and watercolour paintings. Several of the artworks are landscapes, however the majority are portraits of First Nations individuals, including several portraits of Chief Dan George.

Human Resources Files

Series consists of correspondence, memoranda, minutes, forms, reports, handwritten notations, draft copies, volunteer lists, staff lists, job descriptions, papers, event advertisements and other textual records relating to the museum’s human resources activities, including records relating to museum staff and staff positions, volunteers, non-Museum of Anthropology University of British Columbia staff, and the activities of these groups.

The series is divided into the following subseries:

A. Staff Files 1972-2013

B. Volunteers Files 1975-1996

C. Internships and Student Appointments 1988-1994

D. Non-MOA UBC Staff Files 1975-1983

E. Hiring Files 1987-2003

General Administration Files

Series consists of correspondence and memoranda, minutes, reports, contracts and agreements, handwritten notations, draft copies, newspaper clippings, photographs, slides, and other textual and graphic records related to the general administration of the museum and the administrative activities and responsibilities of the Director. Includes records related to museum policies and procedures and their development, the planning of museum activities and goals, the evaluation and accountability of the museum, including files containing museum annual report information and files regarding reviews of the museum, records regarding contracts and agreements made by the museum, and records related to various museum committees. The series also includes records related to the administration of the museum in general, including files regarding the early history of the museum, executive committee and staff meetings and memoranda, as well as files of correspondence and minutes of meetings relating to communications and involvement with the Dean of Arts and the President’s Office.

The series is divided into the following subseries:

A. General Files 1971-2009

B. Policies and Procedures Files 1975-1998

C. Planning Files 1976-2009

D. Accountability and Evaluation Files 1974-ca. 2013

E. Contracts and Agreements Files 1976-1993

F. Committees Files 1970-2009

School Programmes Files

Series consists of correspondence and memoranda, brochures, journal articles, papers, reports, draft copies, grant applications, handwritten notations, and other textual records regarding Museum of Anthropology school programmes. In addition to records regarding specific school programmes, the series includes records relating to the planning of school programmes, the production of workshops, kits, informative brochures for teachers and participant responses.

The series is been divided into the following subseries:

A. General Files 1978-1991

B. Programmes Files 1979-1992

C. Planning Files 1992-1996

D. Teachers’ Workshops and Communications Files [ca.1980]-1993

Personal and missionary photographs

Series consist of loose photographs, a newspaper clipping, photomechanical prints, and one photomechanical print album produced and collected throughout Rev. Crosby’s personal and missionary life, including portraits and group photographs of aboriginal individuals and/or missionaries, photographs of churches, schools, homes, hospitals, and other buildings, and aboriginal cultural and ceremonial objects (artifacts and curios). In addition, photographic events include carvings, church congregations, gathering of aboriginal children from residential schools, weddings, and funerals. Geographic locations depicted in the photographs include (but are not limited to): Chilliwack, Cultus Lake, Fort Essington, Fort Rupert, Fraser River, Greenville, Gold Harbour, Massett Village, Naas River, Port Simpson, River Inlet, Skidegate (Haida), Yale, and Vancouver Island (Nanaimo, Victoria) all in British Columbia; as well as, Whatcom County Washington, USA; Fort Wraugh, Alaska; Port Chester, Alaska; Montreal, Quebec; Norway; and Labrador. Series includes photographers and photograph studios such as Noah Shakespeare, Richard & Hanna Maynard, Carlo Gentile, J.G. Parks, Thos. E. Perkins, Geo Rirton, B.F. Howland & Co., J.M. Jacobsen, Wadds Bros., N. Caple & Co., Hugill, R.Z. Tashiro, Butcher & Co., Brooks, Skene Lowe, Nathan Joseph & Co., and S.A. Spencer. Photographers Carlo Gentile (whose Victoria studio was purchased by Noah Shakespeare) and Frederick Dally (whose negatives were partly acquired by Richard & Hanna Maynard) may also be included but unidentified. Series includes photomechanical prints, albumen prints, cabinet cards, carte-de-visites, gelatin printing-out papers, gelatin developing-out papers, a ferrotype, stereograph prints, and other unidentified print types.

FILE LIST: (with box-folder number, title, and dates)
1-1: Personal and missionary photographs – portraits (and ferrotype), ca. 1860
1-2 : Missionary photographs – reproductions, [199-]
1-3 : Missionary photographs – stereograph cards, 1863 – [191-]
1-4 : Missionary photographs – totem poles and artifacts, 1863 – [191-]
1-5 : Missionary photographs – photomechanical, 1863 – [191-]
2-1 : Personal and missionary photographs, 1863 – [191-]
2-2 : Missionary photographs – artifacts, 1863 – [191-]
2-3 : Missionary photographs – glad tidings, 1863 – [191-]
2-4 : Missionary photographs – Alaska, 1863 – [191-]
2-5 : Missionary photographs – Bella Bella, B.C., 1863 – [191-]
2-6 : Missionary photographs – Chilliwack, B.C. and Cultus Lake, B.C., 1863 – [191-]
2-7 : Missionary photographs – Hazelton, B.C. and Kispiox, B.C. ,1863 – [191-]
2-8 : Missionary photographs – Mission, B.C. and River Inlet, B.C., 1863 – [191-]
2-9 : Missionary photographs – Port Essington, B.C., 1863 – [191-]
2-10 : Missionary photographs – Port Simpson, B.C., 1863 – [191-]
2-11 : Missionary photographs – Vancouver Island, B.C., 1863 – [191-]
2-12 : Missionary photographs – Washington, USA, 1863 – [191-]
2-13 : Missionary photographs – Naas River, B.C., 1863 – [191-]
2-14 : Missionary photographs, 1863 – [191-]

Thomas Crosby

Donation letter

Series consists of a letter written by May Ashurrtt to Museum Director Michael Ames on October 31, 1977. The letter provides details of the donated photographs and the life of Frederich H. Maude, the photographer.

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