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General

Series consists of Conservation records that cannot be attributed to a specific member of the Conservation staff. There are currently only two files in this series. As of 2017, the majority of Conservation records in the archives came from Conservator Miriam Clavir. These records can be found in the Miram Clavir series of the Conservation sous-fonds.

General Administration

This series consists of records created, received, and/or used by individuals, groups or committees responsible for public programming and education function of the Museum.
Contains records related to public programming and education policy development, finances, planning, as well as other administrative activities.
Records in this series include correspondence, memoranda, drafts, query/suggestion forms, meeting minutes, grants, acquisition proposal report, reports, guidelines, policy proposals, and handwritten notes.

University of British Columbia. Museum of Anthropology. Public Programming and Education

General Administration Files

Series consists of correspondence and memoranda, minutes, reports, contracts and agreements, handwritten notations, draft copies, newspaper clippings, photographs, slides, and other textual and graphic records related to the general administration of the museum and the administrative activities and responsibilities of the Director. Includes records related to museum policies and procedures and their development, the planning of museum activities and goals, the evaluation and accountability of the museum, including files containing museum annual report information and files regarding reviews of the museum, records regarding contracts and agreements made by the museum, and records related to various museum committees. The series also includes records related to the administration of the museum in general, including files regarding the early history of the museum, executive committee and staff meetings and memoranda, as well as files of correspondence and minutes of meetings relating to communications and involvement with the Dean of Arts and the President’s Office.

The series is divided into the following subseries:

A. General Files 1971-2009

B. Policies and Procedures Files 1975-1998

C. Planning Files 1976-2009

D. Accountability and Evaluation Files 1974-ca. 2013

E. Contracts and Agreements Files 1976-1993

F. Committees Files 1970-2009

General research

Series consists of records created and collected by McLennan in the course of research on Northwest coast art. McLennan kept files related to research conducted in other museums and archives, on artists he came into contact with, and a series of photographs depicting art styles and objects complied and organized by culture, and ideas and research for books. Each of these comprises its own sub-series.

Gift shop

Series consists of materials pertaining to the Museum of Anthropology's gift shop. These materials include communications about the shop's opening, advertisements for gift shop products, information about sales and special events, and the online store. Record types include press releases, informational pamphlets and hand-outs, product order forms, and bookmarks.

Gitksan

Series documents Jensen and Powell’s work with and visits to the Gitksan speaking villages in North Western British Columbia. Jensen and Powell worked with the Gitksan to produce language and culture material.

Jensen’s first visit to Gitksan territory was in 1975, before they began to work with the communities. Jensen was asked to accompany Dr. Marjorie Halpen of the Museum of Anthropology, Amelia Sussman Schultz (a former student of anthropologist Franz Boas) and UBC grad student Carol Sheehan McLaren to Prince Rupert and various Gitksan villages. The impetus for the journey was that Schultz was interested in recovering her old dissertation notes that she left with William Beynon, a hereditary Tsimshian chief who served as ethnographer, translator, and linguistic consultant to anthropologists including Boas. Although she had never completed her dissertation, in her retirement she regretted leaving the information. During this trip Jensen photographed the Gitksan villages through which they travelled, making special note of the burial houses and totems she encountered.

Two years later the Gitksan band approached Jensen and Powell to create language and culture materials.  Powell secured the funding through the BC Ministry of Education and the federal government.

Powell and Jensen lived and worked with the Gitksan in the summers from 1977 to 1981. The first three years were spent focussing on what they have termed the Eastern dialect. In this period they lived and worked in Kispiox, staying in a teacherage the first year (a small apartment built for housing teachers), and moving in the second year to the back room of the house of one of their linguistic informants, Clara Harris. The third year they again lived with Clara Harris until halfway through the summer when they decided to expand the project to include the Western dialect: at this time they moved to Kitwancool (now known as Gitanyow) where they again lived in a teacherage. The final two summers they returned to Kispiox to live with Clara Harris.

Powell worked with a number of linguistic informants, including Clara Harris, Edith Gawa, and Mary Johnson for the Eastern dialect, and Solomon Marsden, with the help of Ivan Good, Maggie Good, Cindy Morgan, Edith and Abel Campbell, David Milton, Olive Mulwain, Fred Johnson and Jeffrey Morgan for the Western. The materials produced throughout the Gitksan project are divided into Eastern and Western Gitksan. The books produced for the Eastern dialect were called Gitksan for Kids. The books for the Western dialect were called Learning Gitksan. In addition to the educational material, other resources were developed including illustrated alphabet sheets, the Northwest Coast Word List (which was intended as the basis for a full dictionary, a goal that did not transpire), and the Gitksan Teacher’s Manual.

As was the case with all the communities they lived in, Powell and Jensen found that work and recreation in small Aboriginal communities blended together, and many of the activities they took part in were incorporated into the language materials produced. Jensen photographed the cultural activities they attended, and they made audio and photographic records of Elders reminiscing about what they referred to as the “old ways.” Both Jensen and Powell were adopted into Gitksan tribes during their time living in the region: Jensen to the Firweed Clan, and Powell to the Lax Gibuu, or Wolf Clan, both of Kispiox. This series comprises all the records created during their stays in Gitksan villages.

The series consists of nine sub-series:
A. Field notes and correspondence
B. Research
C. Published educational materials
D. Unpublished manuscripts
E. Tsimshian-Gitksan materials
F. Eastern and Western Gitksan recordings
G. Eastern Gitksan photographs
H. Western Gitksan photographs
I. Doreen Jensen
J. Gitksan artist photographs

Guides and brochures

Series consists of informational guides, pamphlets, and brochures printed by, and about, the Museum of Anthropology from the 1970s to the 2010s. Guides and brochures cover general Museum of Anthropology information, such as opening hours, exhibitions, maps, and contact information.

Haisla

Series consists of records pertaining to the work Powell has done in Kitamaat Village.

In 2000 Powell began working on the Haisla Traditional Use Study (TUS) with community members Gerald Amos, Rod Bolton and Louise Barbetti.  For the TUS, Powell conducted interviews and checked information gathered against textual archival records of the region.  The first year of the project was funded by the BC Ministry of Forests, and the second year with a federal grant.  At the end of the second year, the study was completed with a report on the Haisla concept of ownership.

Upon completion of the TUS, Powell stayed on with the Haisla to work on outlining ownership in the regional watersheds to be used in Land and Resource Management Planning (LRMP) negotiations. This led to the creation of a book on Haisla land ownership and other traditions, explained using oral histories, to be distributed during a Unity Feast hosted by Chief Steve Wilson.

As he was working on the Haisla Unity Feast Book, Powell started to push for the development of a Haisla curriculum package for the schools in the Kitimat area. In the summer of 2005 Jenson travelled with Powell to Kitlope and photographed many of the areas included in the traditional oral histories of the region. This trip led to the creation of a curriculum booklet called By Punt to the Kitlope. The pamphlet was so successful that Powell was commissioned to create a booklet for the whole of the traditional Haisla territory. Beginning work on this project led to the discovery that most of the Haisla trapline registrations had lapsed or had been passed on to the incorrect person, owing to confusion between the traditional matrilineal method of inheritance and the emerging patrilineal way of passing on title. Powell embarked on a project with Rod Bolton to re-register Haisla traplines in a way that made sense to the community.

In 2006 Vickie “Eden” Robinson was hired to assist Powell in the creation of an archives for the Haisla, based on the material accrued during the time of Powell’s work in Kitamaat.

In 2008 the Kitamaat Village Council signed a two year contract with Powell. He will work for two weeks out of every two months to complete the remaining outstanding projects, including a Haisla place names map, the introduction to Haisla territory.

The series consists of five sub-series:
A. Notebooks
B. Reports
C. Publications and research material
D. Photographs
E. Interviews

Human Resources Files

Series consists of correspondence, memoranda, minutes, forms, reports, handwritten notations, draft copies, volunteer lists, staff lists, job descriptions, papers, event advertisements and other textual records relating to the museum’s human resources activities, including records relating to museum staff and staff positions, volunteers, non-Museum of Anthropology University of British Columbia staff, and the activities of these groups.

The series is divided into the following subseries:

A. Staff Files 1972-2013

B. Volunteers Files 1975-1996

C. Internships and Student Appointments 1988-1994

D. Non-MOA UBC Staff Files 1975-1983

E. Hiring Files 1987-2003

Illustrations and other artwork

Series consists of illustrations and other artwork made by Stewart, either for personal purposes or to be used in publications authored by other people. In addition to the artwork, the series also includes research, photographs, and correspondence related to the production and publication of the works. The series divided into four sub-series:

A - Personal illustrations and artwork
B - Images: Stone (by Wilson Duff)
C – Wisdom of the Elders (by Ruth Kirk)
D – Antiquity (by Dale Cross)

Images: Stone B.C. records

Correspondence, news clippings, installation and exhibition photographs, and press kits from the Images: Stone: B.C. exhibit that was displayed at the Vancouver Art Gallery and the Greater Victoria Art Gallery. Also includes 2 cassette tapes from the Vancouver Art Gallery dated May 6, 1975 and 1 U-Matic videocassette titled “Images: Stone B.C.: Hilary Stewart, Wilson Duff” dated May 16, 1975.

Kwak’wala

The series contains records created during a number of visits and projects completed with the Kwakwaka'wakw of Alert Bay.

After meeting David Grubb at the Salish Conferences in the early 1970s, Jensen was invited by Grubb to attend a potlatch on Gilford Island, just off Alert Bay.  It was the first potlatch that she attended, and Jensen photographed it in black and white without flash.

Around the same time, Gloria Cranmer Webster began involving her UBC colleague Powell in discussions on the development of a Kwak’wala orthography. The two worked on this project during their breaks at work, with the main end goal to create accurate labels for artefacts at the museum, then located in the basement of the library on campus.

In 1975, after she moved back to Alert Bay, Webster contacted Powell and asked him to assist her in the creation of a language and culture book for Kwak’wala speaking people. Powell travelled to Alert Bay, the first of many trips to do such work. Over the next few years, Powell and Jensen were invited to Alert Bay on a number of occasions to attend potlatches, pole raisings, and other community events. Jensen photographed the events, as well as other aspects of the community such as the day care and band school.

In 1980 Webster, on behalf of the U’Mista Cultural Centre, secured salaries for both Jensen and Powell for one full year. They were hired to produce language and culture books, but in reality helped with many other aspects leading to the opening of the Centre. They rented a house in the village and lived there full time for the year, immersing themselves in the community, and creating a body of records that integrates both work and community life. Jensen had permission to photograph extensively, and these are all included in this series. Powell did linguistic research and worked with teachers from both the band school and the provincial school that were located in the village. Jensen also photographed language and culture lessons to be used in the books being produced. During the year they lived in Alert Bay, they produced 12 language books and a teacher’s manual for U’mista.

In 1982 Powell and Jensen purchased a house in Alert Bay, further cementing their intentions to maintain connections to the community. They continued to attend and photograph events and potlatches between projects.

In 1983 the Kwak’wala Teacher Training Program (KTTP) was developed by Powell and Jensen. The program was a college credit course for local area teachers to train them to lead language and culture lessons in their classes. Jensen and Powell divided their teaching duties, involving another teacher named Joy Wild. The program was successful for two years.

Over the next 20 years many of their visits were social in nature, although they continued to keep a detailed record of the events they attended. In 2001 they completed a CD-ROM for the Learning Kwak’wala series. This project had been ongoing for some time.

The series also contains photographic records of two events that took place outside the realm of the language projects. The Canadian Museum of Civilisation hired Doug Cranmer to carve a new Wakas Pole to replace the decaying version in Stanley Park and contacted Jensen to document the event. The second set of photographs records a trip organised by U’Mista Cultural Centre for scholars and experts to visit Mimkwamlis (Village Island) and T’sadzis’nukwakme’ (New Vancouver).

The records kept in this series consist of recordings, photographs, research notes, draft teaching aids, and copies of completed resources for both children’s education and the KTTP.

The series consists of eleven sub-series:
A. U’Mista research/background
B. Research materials
C. Field notes
D. Publications
E. Kwak’wala teacher training program
F. Kwak’wala CD-ROM project
G. Kwak’wala photographs
H. Potlatch photographs.
I. Wakas pole raising in Stanley Park 1987 photographs
J. Trip to Village Island and New Vancouver photographs 2005.
K. Audio recordings

Maps

Maps created, acquired, and used by Duff in his research and teaching activities. The materials show geographical features; location and boundaries of territories and villages of Northwest coast native people; reserves; language families and distribution, influences, and historical features. Included are ms. maps; and copied, traced, outline and published maps, most with added ms. notations.

The Base maps sub-series consists of topographic maps produced as bases for the creation of other maps to show the locations and territorial boundaries of native people within British Columbia. Maps include ms. notations by Duff.

The Territory maps sub-series consists of ms. maps; and base, outline, copied and photocopied maps with ms. notations. Items show location and boundaries of native territories in British Columbia and the United States. Includes maps showing extent and detail of Tsimshian territory; Kispiox sites; Kitwancool territory and sites; South Kwakiutl territory, villages and tribes. Notations identify some place names and villages.

The Reserve maps sub-series consist of copied and published maps with ms. notations showing the location and extent of various reserves. Some acreage is also included.

The Miscellaneous Maps sub-series consists of published, copied and outline maps showing language families in North America, influences on British Columbia native people, historical distribution of native people in B.C., and Vancouver Island in the 19th century.

Membership

Series consists of material related to membership at the Museum of Anthropology. Records pertain to membership fees, member appreciation events, member survey materials, and general museum communications with members.

Minute book

Series consists of one bound minute book journal detailing Percy Broughton's day-to-day events, including his travels, ailments, visitors, sermons and observations.

Miriam Clavir

Series consists of records associated with the functions and responsibilities assigned to Miriam Clavir in her role as the conservator of the Museum of Anthropology, and/or are related to the Conservation Area, as well as to her teaching activities. Included are: correspondence, memoranda, reports (published and unpublished), evaluations, building (architectural) plans, photographs, slides, e-mails, facsimiles, computer disks, and audio cassettes.

The series is arranged in the following six subseries:

  1. Administrative Records
  2. Conservation Records
  3. Exhibit Records
  4. Teaching & Internship Records
  5. Building Records
  6. Conference Records

Miriam Clavir

Miscellaneous

Series consists of textual records and graphic records including photographs and slides of Dr. Halpin’s activities at the Museum of Anthropology. Included in this series are unlabelled photographs of a staff retreat, Halpin giving tours at the Museum of Anthropology, slides of MOA, visible storage, artifacts, and NWC objects found in displays and museums across Canada, the United States and Europe. Also included are personal photographs of Halpin and of her dog “Cammy” who frequently joined Halpin at the museum. Textual records in this series include a bibliography by Ron Hamilton on “18th Century Northwest Coast Explorers Observations-Early Collection and Maritime Fur Trade” and printed out CD-Rom templates for “A Century of Indian Art.”

Miscellaneous Materials

Series consists of four files:

  1. Publications
  2. Other Materials
  3. Speech Notes
  4. General Notes

One accompanying compact disc contains scanned images of the Almanac, map, children’s rhymes, two Tibetan songs, and a verse for a New Year’s toast, and philatelic materials.

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