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archivistische beschrijving
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Book 10, tape 2: Learning Kwak'wala Series

Item consists of a recording of the Learning Kwak’wala book 10: Workbook and accompanies Book 7: This One – That One, and it features Agnes Cranmer, Margaret Cook, and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak’wala; Side A: pages 32-49; Side B: pages 50-59. Recorded on both sides.

Axu Leading Potlatch Procession

Image of Agnes Alfed leading a procession. People on the background.
Handwritten annotation on back "Axu leading potlatch procession. No date" and number 10-1.
Item was originally numbered by creator with number 123.

Martine J. Reid

Book 11, tape 1: Learning Kwak'wala Series

Item consists of a recording of the Learning Kwak’wala book 11: Workbook, and accompanies Book 8: Here and There, and it features Margaret Cook, Agnes Cranmer, and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer and Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak’wala; Side A: pages 4-22, the audio for page 13 includes examples not listed in the workbook, skips from page 15 to page 20, stop midway through the exercises on page 22; Side B: page 22-35, continues from the exercises on page 22, in the exercise for page 35 the last question uses "Indian Dancer" for the English translation of the sentence. Recorded on both sides.

Book 11, tape 2: Learning Kwak'wala Series

Item consists of a recording of the Learning Kwak’wala book 11: Workbook, and it features Agnes Cranmer, Margaret Cook, and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer and Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak’wala; Side A: pages 36-59, on page 39, "Indian" is used for the English translation of a sentence, skips the review on pages 51-54 and ends with the days of the week and the months. Recorded only on side A, no sound on side B.

Axu 2003

Image of Agnes Alfred with a wooden sweeter.
Handwritten annotation on back "Axu 2003"
Item was originally numbered by creator with number 125 and note to location Alert Bay.

Martine J. Reid

Final lecture of Anthropology 301, April 3, 1974, “Resurgence of Indian Culture”

Item is an audio recording of a lecture given by Wilson Duff on the “Resurgence of Indian Culture.” On side A, Duff speaks on the failings of colonialist education systems, First Nations traditional knowledge, and his interpretations of Haida art. Works discussed include a Raven rattle and a chest carved by Charles Edenshaw. Side B continues with Duff’s observations on government interest in, and appropriation of, First Nations art and culture as symbols of Canadian identity, and cultural repatriation.

Book 1: My Village, My House

Item consists of a recording of Learning Kwak'wala: Book 1 My Village My House, and it features Agnes Cranmer, Margaret Cook, and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer and Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak'wala; Side A: pages 36, 4-18 begins with the Kwak'wala alphabet, and covers the vocabulary for the types of houses and villages, places in the villages their locations with a focus on Alert Bay and surrounding villages, where someone is going, asking what something is, things found at the breakwater, things found at the grocery store and how to express when someone wants something, things found in a school and phrases used in a school setting, vocabulary for things found in nature and how to describe the weather, for the English translation of bak'wam "Indian" is used; Side B: pages 19-33, and covers things used when camping and where things are in the camp, parts of a house and things found there, grammar for who owns a house, vocabulary associated with cooking, eating, and the kitchen, items found in the living room, items found in the bathroom, things in the bedroom, numbers and how to say how many houses and boats there are. Also begins book 2 with some of the vocabulary for family members, but this is also covered in the tape specific to book 2. Recorded on both sides.

Town at the head of the inlet

Item is a series of two photographs showing the rooftops of houses and a totem pole in the foreground. The pole is known as the Nispiq Pole. It belonged to Chief Simon Walkus, Sr. and tells of the origins of the Wuikinuxv people.

C. MacKay

House of Chief Albert Harry

Item is a photograph showing the family and relatives of Chief Albert Harry. From left to right: Kitty Harry, Albert Harry, Ned Wesley, Thomas Hailhemas and Mary Johnson-Walkus.

C. MacKay

Book 2: Learning Kwak'wala

Item consists of a recording of Learning Kwak'wala: Book 2 My Family My Friends, and it features Agnes Cranmer, Margaret Cook, and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer and Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak'wala; Side A: pages 31, 4-19 , starts with the alphabet sheet at the end of the workbook, and then covers the vocabulary for family members, grammar to express someone's family relationships, words to distinguish people by age, if someone knows someone else, words to describe people and the distinction when they are or are not present; Side B: pages 19-31, and continues how to describe people, and the distinction when they are or are not present, vocabulary for someone's job, counting how many family members someone has, vocabulary on asking is someone is Nimpkish and where they are from and the distinction between asking a man or a woman, vocabulary for where someone live, if someone knows how to speak Kwak'wala, and a review of the alphabet and suffixes used for pronouns and subjects, when describing someone who performs dances the English translation uses "Indian Dancer." Recorded on both sides.

Lecture on Women and bears, February 26, 1974

Item is an audio recording of a lecture given by Wilson Duff on “Women and Bears.” Duff uses the story of the woman who married a bear, represented in a Haida sculpture, to frame a discussion of the disenfranchisement of First Nations women under the Indian Act, the Lavell case (AG v. Lavell, 1971) and the Bedard case (R v. Bedard, 1973), and Haida and Nisga’a art. Lecture is recorded on both Side A and Side B.

Book 5: Learning Kwak'wala The Sounds of Kwak'wala

Item consists of a recording of Learning Kwak'wala: Book 5 The Sounds of Kwak'wala, and it features Agnes Cranmer, Margaret Cook, and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer and Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak’wala; Side A: pages 5-28, covers the names of most of the Kwak'wala speaking peoples and their dialects, the Kwak'wala alphabet, how to pronounce vowels, consonants, the glottal stop, and the barred Side B: pages 29-52, continues with how to pronounce the barred L, and covers the rest of the consonants, back consonant sounds, rounded consonant sounds, explosive consonant sounds, and double letter sounds, one English translation on page 33 refers to the cedar bark daces as "Indian dancing," also the English translation for someone of African descent on page 45 uses the word "Negro." Recorded on both sides.

Book 7, tape 2: Learning Kwak'wala

Item consists of a recording of Learning Kwak'wala: Book 7 This One That One, and it features Agnes Cranmer, Margaret Cook, and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer and Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak’wala; Side A: pages 26-40, starts with exercises for buying something that is or is not in sight, and continues with who something is for when they are or are not present, the grammar for doing something and the subject is either present or absent, past tense forms, future tense forms, pointer words, action words without objects, and action words that take objects; Side B: pages 40-57, continues past tense exercises on page 40, and covers how to say and adjective does not apply to someone, when someone is not doing something, the words for very and really, positive and negative answer patterns, grammar to ask what someone is doing, and what someone did in the past. Recorded on both sides.

Narrative and Songs from Fort Fraser, Hagwilget, Kispiox, Shuswap

Item is an audio recording made by Wilson Duff that features narrative and songs spoken and sung in several First Nations languages.

The first segment of the recording took place on August 1, 1962 in Fort Fraser at the home of Maxime George and the language used is Dakelh; accompanying documentation states that Mr. George was away but his sister Bernadette Grey was present along with Mrs. George and her sister.

The second segment of the recording took place on August 3, 1962 in Hagwilget at the house of Pete and Bernadette Grey and the language used is Dakelh; accompanying documentation states that the main singer is Donald Gray and his wife.

The third segment of the recording took place on August 16, 1962 featuring Johnson Williams, who has a Kitwancool name of Guano and the language used is Gitxsan.

The fourth segment of the recording took place on August 16, 1962 featuring Maxime George. The fifth portion of the recording is a Kitwancool recording. The final segment of the recording features Shuswap songs.

A two page document accompanied the recording. Document text:
Carrier

  1. Fort Fraser, Aug 1, 1962. W. Duff at home of Maxine George. He was away, but his daughter Bernadette Gray, her sister, and Mrs M George were present.
    (1) Song. Same repeated
    (2) Song (very short)
    (3) Song
  2. Hagwilget, Aug 3 1962. At house of Pete and Bernadette Gray. Main singer old Donald Gray (94). His aged wife (104) also present.
    (4) Song (Sun Song)
    Not transcribed Song
    Talk about names
    (5) Song, then talk about languages
    not transcribed Song
    (6) Song, then talk of moon, explaining song
    Song, then explained Sun is traveling in the sky. Talk about peacemaking forgets next song, talk about languages
    (7) Song. Sung song, for making peace
    Song. Long song, then explained. END
  3. Kispiox August 16, 1962. John Williams, who has Kitwancool name Guno. Gitksan.
    (8) Tells Neegamks story in English, includes singing of Neegamks song
    (9) Love song
    (10) Song for welcoming guests
  4. Kispiox, same time as above. Jonathan Johnson sings his direge song
  5. Fort Fraser, August 16 1962. Maxine George, others as above, 1.
    Lahal Song
  6. Song, break, then same song to end of tape
    (reverse tape)
  7. Automobile song interpreted by Bernadette
    Hudson Bay Rum song
    Maxine George tells story of origin of mosquitoes in English
    Then same in Carrier
    Same, origin of fire, water, daylight in English
    Hymn in Carrier, repeated
    Another hymn
  8. Kitwancool recording, self explanatory
  9. Shuswap songs, self explanatory

Book 8, tape 1: Learning Kwak'wala

Item consists of part 1 a recording of Learning Kwak'wala: Book 8 Here & There and it features Agnes Cranmer, Margaret Cook, and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer and Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak’wala; Side A: pages 4-13, and covers singular and plural endings, where someone is going, and where someone went; Side B: pages 14-24, continues how to express where some one is and what they are doing, and covers when someone is going somewhere, and how to tell the time. Recorded on both sides.

Book 8, tape 2: Learning Kwak'wala

Item consists of part 2 of a recording of Learning Kwak’wala: Book 8 Here & There, and it features Agnes Cranmer, Margaret Cook, and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer and Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak’wala; Side A: pages 25-33 covers where people are, when they arrived and where items are, Agnes Cranmer provides another word for Vancouver in Kwak’wala that is not listed on page 27; Side B: pages 33-43 covers the locations of items in or on an object ad provides a distinction between small and larger locations. Recorded on both sides, page numbers in the audio are ahead by one and two page numbers from the physical workbook, and the list of vocabulary is in a slightly different order than the workbook. Recorded on both sides.

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