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Archival description
Vickie Jensen and Jay Powell
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Morphological lexicon

Consists of notes and other records relating to the development of a morphological lexicon for Nuu-chah-nulth. Morphology is the linguistic practice of identification, analysis and description of the structure of words. A morpheme is the smallest meaningful unit in the grammar of a language. The morphological lexicon developed for Nuu-chah-nulth by Powell is an inventory of the whole of the language’s morphemes, or meaningful sounds in its vocabulary.

Audio recordings

Consists of audio recordings of community members reading the Nuu-chah-nulth language education books. The recordings consist of more than one copy of most of the books, as they are read in various dialects

Salishan

Series contains records relating to Jensen and Powell’s work with the Salishan language groups in Musqueam and Shalalth territories, and events related to those communities. Although the records were created in a number of villages at different periods of time, Jensen and Powell arranged them together due to the linguistic connection they share.

In 1975 Powell received an Urgent Ethnology grant from the National Museum of Man (Now the Canadian Museum of Civilization) to do linguistic work in Kitamaat. However, this work fell through, and Powell contacted Arnold Guerin of the Musqueam band to discuss using the grant to prepare materials for Guerin’s Hunqum’i’num classes. Together they planned to produce three books: one of phonetics, one on grammar, and one on maths, with Jensen’s assistance in the layout and photography. From reel-to-reel recordings Powell and Paul Thiele of the UBC Library for the Blind produced cassettes to accompany the books. Only the first book was completed as planned, but Powell adapted the notes they had already taken to create two books for younger children. All of this resulted in Musqueam Language: Book 1 and Hunq’um’i’num for Kids: Books 1 & 2. Three years later in 1978 Leona Sparrow hired Jensen on grant money to teach a black and white photography course.

In 1989 the principal of the Shalalth School asked Powell to work with the band on language books.  With Harold Oldman and Bev Frank he compiled materials for two books, which were not published.  He also completed an alphabet sheet for the community to use.

Series also includes photographs taken by Jensen in 2003 of a ceremony returning city land to the Musequeam near Vanier Park.

Series comprises four sub-series:
A. Field notes and research
B. Publications
C. Musqueam photographs
D. Salishan audio recordings
E. Squamish photographs

Field notes and research

Consists of notes and research relating to the creation of the books Musqueam Language: Book 1 and Hunq’um’i’num for Kids: Books 1 & 2, as well as research done for the Shalalath Lilooet language and culture program.

Publications

Includes copies of Powell’s publications Musqueam Language: Book 1 and Hunq’um’i’num for Kids: Books 1 & 2. Also includes publications used by Powell for research purposes: The Helk’eminem Skwayel Calendar; A Vocabulary of Native Words in the Halkomelem Language by Oliver Wells; Cuystwi Malh Ucwalmicwts: Beginners and Intermediate (Teach yourself Lilooet).

Musqueam photographs

Consists of photographs taken for the Musqueam Language: Book 1 and Hunq’um’i’num for Kids: Books 1 & 2, photographs taken as part of the class that Jensen taught at Musqueam in 1978 and historical photographs.

Salishan audio recordings

Consists of audio recordings made as part of the research for the Musqueam and Seton Lake Lillooet language materials. The Musqueam recordings mainly consist of interviews with informant Andrew Guerin on lexical and grammatical aspects of the language. The information on these recordings were used by Powell in the Musqueam language books. The Lillooet recordings are of community member Cida Link reading the Lillooet alphabet. These were done to accompany educational materials.

Shuswap

Series consists of records pertaining to the development of Shushwap Language books and a teacher’s manual.

In the summer of 1979 Jensen and Powell moved to Alkali Lake for the summer to begin the Shuswap project.  The work later expanded to include the communities of Soda Creek, Dog Creek, Canim Lake and Sugar Cane.  Their primary language resources were Phyllis Chelsea and Celina Harry for the younger students’ books, and Phyllis Chelsea, Celina Harry, Cecelia DeRose, May Dixon, Elizabeth Pete, Minnie Phillips, Margaret Gilbert, Lucy Archie, Sharon Paul, and Cecile Harry for the older students’ book.  In the latter part of the project Powell and Jensen also developed a curriculum with Joy Wild, and produced a teacher’s manual.

The series consists of seven sub-series:
A. Project records phase I
B. Project records phase II
C. Research
D. Original manuscripts for publications
E. Shuswap Teacher Training
F. Photographs and slides
G. Recordings.

Project records phase 1

Consists of correspondence, grant applications, and records of Phase 1 of the Shuswap project. Phase 1 covered the original contract to work with the community at Alkali Lake.

Project records phase 2

Consists of correspondence, grant proposals and applications, and other records relating to Phase 2 of the Shuswap project. Phase 2 includes all the records pertaining to the project after it expanded to include the communities of Soda Creek, Dog Creek, Canim Lake and Sugar Cane.

Research

Consists of research materials on the Shuswap language and culture, mostly work done by Aert Kuipers, a Dutch linguist who documented a number of British Columbian languages in the mid-twentieth century.

Original manuscripts publications

Consists of the original manuscripts of Let’s Study Shuswap: Book 1, Let’s Study Shuswap: Book 2, Learning Shuswap: Book 1, and Learning Shuswap: Book 2. Manuscripts include typed and handwritten sections, original illustrations, and photographs. Sub-series also includes Shuswap alphabet sheet.

Shuswap teacher training

Consists of materials produced for teaching training and development during Phase 2 of the Shuswap project. Includes a Teacher’s Manual developed with the assistance of Joy Wild, teaching units, Chilcotin readers by Maria Myers (produced during this period by Jensen) and a Chilcotin alphabet sheet.

Photographs and slides

Consists of photographs and slides created for use in the Let’s Study Shuswap books, as well as a number of images of Jensen, Powell, and their two young sons in the community.

Recordings

Consists of audio recordings of the Let’s Study Shuswap and Learning Shuswap series of books. Created to accompany the language education materials.

Haisla

Series consists of records pertaining to the work Powell has done in Kitamaat Village.

In 2000 Powell began working on the Haisla Traditional Use Study (TUS) with community members Gerald Amos, Rod Bolton and Louise Barbetti.  For the TUS, Powell conducted interviews and checked information gathered against textual archival records of the region.  The first year of the project was funded by the BC Ministry of Forests, and the second year with a federal grant.  At the end of the second year, the study was completed with a report on the Haisla concept of ownership.

Upon completion of the TUS, Powell stayed on with the Haisla to work on outlining ownership in the regional watersheds to be used in Land and Resource Management Planning (LRMP) negotiations. This led to the creation of a book on Haisla land ownership and other traditions, explained using oral histories, to be distributed during a Unity Feast hosted by Chief Steve Wilson.

As he was working on the Haisla Unity Feast Book, Powell started to push for the development of a Haisla curriculum package for the schools in the Kitimat area. In the summer of 2005 Jenson travelled with Powell to Kitlope and photographed many of the areas included in the traditional oral histories of the region. This trip led to the creation of a curriculum booklet called By Punt to the Kitlope. The pamphlet was so successful that Powell was commissioned to create a booklet for the whole of the traditional Haisla territory. Beginning work on this project led to the discovery that most of the Haisla trapline registrations had lapsed or had been passed on to the incorrect person, owing to confusion between the traditional matrilineal method of inheritance and the emerging patrilineal way of passing on title. Powell embarked on a project with Rod Bolton to re-register Haisla traplines in a way that made sense to the community.

In 2006 Vickie “Eden” Robinson was hired to assist Powell in the creation of an archives for the Haisla, based on the material accrued during the time of Powell’s work in Kitamaat.

In 2008 the Kitamaat Village Council signed a two year contract with Powell. He will work for two weeks out of every two months to complete the remaining outstanding projects, including a Haisla place names map, the introduction to Haisla territory.

The series consists of five sub-series:
A. Notebooks
B. Reports
C. Publications and research material
D. Photographs
E. Interviews

Notebooks

Consists of copies of six notebooks kept by Powell during the first two years of his work with the Haisla speaking people. Notebooks contain notes taken during interviews in Kitamaat.

Reports

Consists of reports done by Powell for the Kitamaat Village Council on the traditional use and occupancy of land as it relates to a number of issues, such as specific resource areas and land under proposal for non-traditional uses.

Publications and research material

Consists of notes and copies of two publications: By Punt to Kitlope (curriculum booklet 2006); two copies of the Haisla Unity Feast Book, called Our Lands, Nuyem and Stories (2005); 160 km of Haisla History: Guidebook for a visit to the Kitlope; and Our Nuyem Says… (a school curriculum).

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