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Published and unpublished papers and reviews

Series consists of published and unpublished papers, book reviews, prefaces and poems written by Dr. Halpin while she was the curator of Ethnology at the Museum of Anthropology. Included is Dr. Halpin’s paper on “Visible Storage”, a preface to Potlatch by Joe David, and an article on “Museums in Literature”.

Quileute

Powell first went to La Push, the Quileute village in Washington State, in 1969 to complete research for his PhD dissertation Proto-Chimakuan: A Reconstruction. While he documented the language he also developed relationships with the local families. During Jensen’s initial visit to La Push, the couple began their first collaborative work with the Quileute, as Jensen photographed the community for eventual use in a language book.

Powell completed his dissertation in 1974, but the language revival projects had only just begun for Jensen and Powell.  Over the next 36 years, they spent time in La Push every year, sometimes travelling down for a weekend, and sometimes staying for a month or two.  The results of these regular visits are a number of general linguistic books for adults and children; Big Books on culture specific themes to be used in schools; teaching materials to be used by Quileute language and culture teachers; cultural resource studies; dictionaries; and translated stories and resources for smaller language revitalization projects.  The records in this series consist of Powell’s research notes; drafts and outlines for the language books; photographs documenting the community; Jensen’s photographs taken of particular subjects for use in language and culture books; audio and visual records of events, stories, and cultural activities.

Jensen and Powell have a continuing relationship with the Quileute and are currently involved in an ongoing language revitalization project. Another dictionary is due to be published in 2009.

The series consists of eleven sub-series:
A. Research
B. Field notes
C. Administrative records
D. Publications
E. Village life photographs
F. Modern basket weavers’ photographs
G. Counting book photographs
H. Historical photographs and artefacts
I. Photographs of La Push folks
J. Audio recordings
K. Quinault materials

Renovation records

Series reflects Cunningham’s involvement in facility planning at MOA. This includes the development of the Gallery 10 orientation centre, visible storage area, and Gallery 3 development, as well as renovations to Gallery 5, theatre, the Great Hall, and the gift shop. Records in this series include blueline print, budgets, invoices, measurements, memoranda, plans, reports, and tender drawings.

Requests for operating funds

Series consists of correspondence between Dean Douglas T. Kenny and other members of the Planning and Coordinating Committee, and other committees concerned with obtaining resources for continuing operation of the Museum of Man, and letters from federal and provincial government departments. Also included are budget estimates, maintenance estimates, copies of minutes from various committees, a pamphlet concerning the erosion of Point Grey Cliff, and a notice concerning the Point Grey Cliffs from the UBC Alumni Association. The majority of the correspondence is copies of outgoing correspondence.

Research notes and materials

Hand-written and typed materials by Duff, possibly compiled during research for lectures or publications. The records cover a variety of topics, including population distribution and native cultures, and six bracelet molds.

Salishan

Series contains records relating to Jensen and Powell’s work with the Salishan language groups in Musqueam and Shalalth territories, and events related to those communities. Although the records were created in a number of villages at different periods of time, Jensen and Powell arranged them together due to the linguistic connection they share.

In 1975 Powell received an Urgent Ethnology grant from the National Museum of Man (Now the Canadian Museum of Civilization) to do linguistic work in Kitamaat. However, this work fell through, and Powell contacted Arnold Guerin of the Musqueam band to discuss using the grant to prepare materials for Guerin’s Hunqum’i’num classes. Together they planned to produce three books: one of phonetics, one on grammar, and one on maths, with Jensen’s assistance in the layout and photography. From reel-to-reel recordings Powell and Paul Thiele of the UBC Library for the Blind produced cassettes to accompany the books. Only the first book was completed as planned, but Powell adapted the notes they had already taken to create two books for younger children. All of this resulted in Musqueam Language: Book 1 and Hunq’um’i’num for Kids: Books 1 & 2. Three years later in 1978 Leona Sparrow hired Jensen on grant money to teach a black and white photography course.

In 1989 the principal of the Shalalth School asked Powell to work with the band on language books.  With Harold Oldman and Bev Frank he compiled materials for two books, which were not published.  He also completed an alphabet sheet for the community to use.

Series also includes photographs taken by Jensen in 2003 of a ceremony returning city land to the Musequeam near Vanier Park.

Series comprises four sub-series:
A. Field notes and research
B. Publications
C. Musqueam photographs
D. Salishan audio recordings
E. Squamish photographs

School Programmes Files

Series consists of correspondence and memoranda, brochures, journal articles, papers, reports, draft copies, grant applications, handwritten notations, and other textual records regarding Museum of Anthropology school programmes. In addition to records regarding specific school programmes, the series includes records relating to the planning of school programmes, the production of workshops, kits, informative brochures for teachers and participant responses.

The series is been divided into the following subseries:

A. General Files 1978-1991

B. Programmes Files 1979-1992

C. Planning Files 1992-1996

D. Teachers’ Workshops and Communications Files [ca.1980]-1993

School programming

This series consists of records created, received, and/or used by the staff responsible for school programming.

The series includes records which document the creation, organization, administration and execution of educational programming for students. The series contains the following kinds of records: correspondence, memoranda, press releases, school kits, teachers’ notes, educational program instructions, publications, evaluation reports, newspaper clippings, promotional brochures and handouts, interviews, interview consent forms, media consent forms, photographs, audio and video recordings, and other material related to school programs.

Shuswap

Series consists of records pertaining to the development of Shushwap Language books and a teacher’s manual.

In the summer of 1979 Jensen and Powell moved to Alkali Lake for the summer to begin the Shuswap project.  The work later expanded to include the communities of Soda Creek, Dog Creek, Canim Lake and Sugar Cane.  Their primary language resources were Phyllis Chelsea and Celina Harry for the younger students’ books, and Phyllis Chelsea, Celina Harry, Cecelia DeRose, May Dixon, Elizabeth Pete, Minnie Phillips, Margaret Gilbert, Lucy Archie, Sharon Paul, and Cecile Harry for the older students’ book.  In the latter part of the project Powell and Jensen also developed a curriculum with Joy Wild, and produced a teacher’s manual.

The series consists of seven sub-series:
A. Project records phase I
B. Project records phase II
C. Research
D. Original manuscripts for publications
E. Shuswap Teacher Training
F. Photographs and slides
G. Recordings.

Site visit notes

Series consists of notes Duff took while visiting First Nations communities. The materials consist of handwritten notes by Duff concerning totem poles, carvers, language and social organization of the communities. There are also some notes of conversations with community members or stories recounted by them.

Somewhere Between records

Series consists of images found in or related to Carter's 1966 published work. Focus is on photographic representations of First Nations communities along B.C.'s North coast, including the Xwemelch'stn (Coast Salish), Kynoc, Kitisug, Klemtu and Tsleil-Waututh nations. Files are generally arranged chronologically according to locality and/or subject matter. Except where noted with square brackets, the titles for files and items in this series were taken from annotations on the original material.

Anthony Carter

Sound Recordings

Cassette and sound reel recordings of lectures given by Duff for Anthropology 301 and 304 and at external events. Also included are various interviews by Duff and taped narratives, songs, and stories by Maxime George (Fort Fraser), Donald Gray (Haqwilget), Johnson Williams (Kispiox), Maxine George (Dakelh) and “Shuswap Songs” by Amy August, Mrs. Wellard, Henry Samson, and Basil Dennis.

Sound Recordings

Series consists of the sound recordings about, by, or related to the Museum of Anthropology. Sound recordings can be found in many collections and fonds in the MOA Archives; the recordings in this General Media collection are those that do not belong to a more specific archival collection, usually because their provenance is not known.

Sound recordings

Series consists of six sound recordings, digitized from three cassette tapes. Recorded content includes Xa'islakala vocabulary and sentence exercises, along with compiled segments of radio reports and interviews regarding events in and around Kitimat in the 1970s and early 1980s. Recorded language materials are intended to be used as supplementary to the textual course materials.

Special projects

This series consists of records relating to special educational projects carried out by staff responsible for MOA’s public programming and education function, such as the development of exhibits and educational materials such as websites, videos, source books, text and image labels, and project resources. The series contains correspondence, meeting minutes, audio and video recordings, interview transcripts, photographs, internship reports, research trip resource binders, panels, exhibit comment postcards and tags, access handbooks, conference proposals, conference programs, conference reports, publications, and marketing materials.

Public Programming and Education. University of British Columbia. Museum of Anthropology.

Student Project files

Series consists of records relating to display units and museum exhibits that were done by students of Anthropology 431 and Anthropology 432 (course titles included Museum Practice and Curatorship, Anthropology of Public Presentation, and Museum Studies and Principles). The records are group assignments that include journals, correspondence, permissions for use, exhibit receipts, exhibit proposals, agreement forms, interview transcripts, research notes, design sketches, invitations, colour samples, samples of mounting materials, colour printouts, negatives, slides and photographs.

The records are divided into the following sub-series:

A Visible Storage 1994
B Gallery Design Concepts 1994
C What Are You Looking At? 1998
D A Break in the Ice 1998-1999
E Who is This Benetton Anyway? 2001
F Koerner Gallery 2001
G Viewpoints 2002
H Celadon: Beyond the Glaze 2003
I Site to Sight: Imaging the Sacred 2004
J The Multiverse Gallery rotational project 2013
K Syllabi and Teaching Files 1999-2013

Student papers

Series consists of notes and papers written by Duff when he was an anthropology student at UBC.

Tait

Series documents Nisga’a artist Norman Tait and his crew of carvers during a period in which they were prolific in their creation of totem poles.

Jensen first met Tait in the early 1970s when she would photographic artists’ works for Bud Mintz, Vancouver gallery owner.  In 1985 she had the idea to produce a book documenting the carving of a totem pole from start to finish.  She approached Tait, who initially refused but called Jensen back just a few days later to take her up on the offer, after being commissioned to create a pole for the Native Education Centre in Vancouver.

Jensen photographed Tait and his crew, which consisted of his brother Robert (Chip), his cousin Harry Martin (Hammy), his nephew Wayne Young and his eldest son Isaac (Ikey). She also made notes and audio recordings of Tait’s lessons to his crew, most of whom had never worked on such a large project. The photographs and tapes were used in the creation of the book Where the People Gather: Carving a Totem Pole. The project also led to the publication of a children’s version, Carving a Totem Pole and a paperback version titled Totem Pole Carving. The books were published in the early 1990s.

Jensen documented Tait’s next two major commissions: two poles for Capilano Mall in 1986, and a pole for Stanley Park in 1987.

In 1987 Tait adopted Jensen into the Nisga’a Eagle Clan and began to teach her about the responsibilities that came with the honour. The lessons were put into practice in 2001 when Tait asked Vickie to guard the body of a family member that had died.

The series includes photographic records of the creation of the four poles; audio recordings of lessons and interviews with Tait; transcripts of the audio tapes; and notes. The series consists of five sub-series:

A. Native Education Centre (NEC) pole photographs
B. Capilano Mall and Stanley Park poles photographs
C. Misc. photographs
D. Tait family and crew artists’ photographs
E. Audio tapes and transcripts.

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