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Canada Item Kwakwaka'wakw
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Kwakiutl, raven totem pole #3, Totem Park, UBC, Vancouver

Carved by Charlie James c. 1900 (Fort Rupert). Collected by Marius Barbeau and Arthur Price. The pole was re-adzed and re-painted by Kwakwaka'wakw carver Mungo Martin before shipping in 1947. Repainted and repaired by Ellen Neel (1949) and by Mungo Martin (1950-51). It stood at Totem Pole Park, UBC Campus until it was re-located to the Museum's Great Hall c. 1976.

Mrs. Sewid and daughters

Photograph of a woman identified as Mrs. Sewid and four younger women identified as her daughters. All five of them are in ceremonial dress. They are standing outside, with a group of spectators behind them. It is not clear what type of event they are at. A stamp on the verso of the print indicates that it was printed in 1958.

Mildred Laurie

Old house posts, Hope Island

Image of two old house posts on Hope Island, BC. The post on the right appears to be the same as a post now housed at the Museum of Anthropology, that was collected from Hope Island in 1956. Both posts feature a human figure with large eyes. On one post, the figure is holding a small face near its waist. On the other post, the figure is holding what appears to be an animal of some kind. The Museum of Anthropology's website provides the following description of the posts: "The posts of the unfinished house of Ha'm'cit were carved by a man from Smith Inlet called Si.wit who moved to Xu'mtaspi and married Tom Omhyid's mother. Ha'm'cit died before the house was finished. (Information provided to Prof. Wilson Duff by Mungo Martin). The artist's potlatch name was P'aczsmaxw. Wayne Suttles places the Xu'mtaspi village as Nahwitti, in historic times, however it was occupied jointly by the Nahwitti, the Yalhinuxw, and the Noqemqilisala (of Hanson Lagoon)."

Sam Weber with mask, Kingcome

Image of Kingcome resident holding a mask carved by the late chief Willie Seaweed of Blunden Harbour. A colour version of this image is printed on page 49 of Carter's book From History's Locker.

Anthony Carter

Tall totem pole, Alert Bay, BC

Photograph of a totem pole in Alert Bay, BC. This pole has been called the world's tallest totem pole, though this is a disputed fact since it is actually comprised of two pieces. The pole is not specific to a particular family, but represents multiple tribes of the Kwakwaka'wakw. The pole was completed in the late 1960's and raised in 1973. It is located near the Big House.

Mildred Laurie

The Pacific Passage

Image depicts the exhibition The Pacific Passage installed at the Vancouver International Airport. The focal point of the photograph is Hetux, a large Thunderbird sculpture created by artist Connie Watts (Nuu-chah-nulth, Gitxsan and Kwakwaka'wakw).

Totem Park, UBC, Vancouver, Kwakiutl (#2 + 5 carved by Mungo Martin), Alert Bay sea lion pole #2, new Mungo Martin pole #5, frontal pole #6, eagle crest pole #7

This pole was on display at UBC in Totem Park in the 1960’s and 1970’s and moved to the Museum in the late 1970’s. It was carved in 1914 in Tsaxis (Fort Rupert) by George Hunt Sr. for the Edward S. Curtis film "In the Land of the War Canoes" which was originally titled "In the Land of the Head Hunters". The pole was collected by Marius Barbeau and Arthur Price in 1947. The pole was repaired and re-painted by carvers Ellen Neel in 1949 and Mungo Martin in 1950-51. It stood at Totem Park, UBC Campus until it was re-located to the Museum's Great Hall in 1976.

Iconography: Kolus is a young thunderbird. Thunderbird is a supernatural bird identifiable by the presence of ear-like projections or horns on the head, and a re-curved beak. The pole alludes to the story of Tongas people in south Alaska, who migrated south.

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