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Gift shop

Series consists of materials pertaining to the Museum of Anthropology's gift shop. These materials include communications about the shop's opening, advertisements for gift shop products, information about sales and special events, and the online store. Record types include press releases, informational pamphlets and hand-outs, product order forms, and bookmarks.

Collected research and ephemera

Series consists of research material collected by Stewart that cannot be identified as being for one particular project, as well as miscellaneous memorabilia and ephemera. Although material in this series is not necessarily connected to a particular project, it is all related thematically to Stewart’s research interests in the art and culture of First Nations peoples of the Pacific Northwest.

Papua New Guinea Footage

The collection consists of 5 Super 8 video reel tapes with footage of schools and the community Iris and Jack visited during their time in Papua New Guinea. Reels include footage about: Goroka Market, Goroka Teachers College, a primary school, a show, and an Eid-el-Fitr ceremony.

General Administration

This series consists of records created, received, and/or used by individuals, groups or committees responsible for public programming and education function of the Museum.
Contains records related to public programming and education policy development, finances, planning, as well as other administrative activities.
Records in this series include correspondence, memoranda, drafts, query/suggestion forms, meeting minutes, grants, acquisition proposal report, reports, guidelines, policy proposals, and handwritten notes.

Public Programming and Education. University of British Columbia. Museum of Anthropology.

Quileute

Powell first went to La Push, the Quileute village in Washington State, in 1969 to complete research for his PhD dissertation Proto-Chimakuan: A Reconstruction. While he documented the language he also developed relationships with the local families. During Jensen’s initial visit to La Push, the couple began their first collaborative work with the Quileute, as Jensen photographed the community for eventual use in a language book.

Powell completed his dissertation in 1974, but the language revival projects had only just begun for Jensen and Powell.  Over the next 36 years, they spent time in La Push every year, sometimes travelling down for a weekend, and sometimes staying for a month or two.  The results of these regular visits are a number of general linguistic books for adults and children; Big Books on culture specific themes to be used in schools; teaching materials to be used by Quileute language and culture teachers; cultural resource studies; dictionaries; and translated stories and resources for smaller language revitalization projects.  The records in this series consist of Powell’s research notes; drafts and outlines for the language books; photographs documenting the community; Jensen’s photographs taken of particular subjects for use in language and culture books; audio and visual records of events, stories, and cultural activities.

Jensen and Powell have a continuing relationship with the Quileute and are currently involved in an ongoing language revitalization project. Another dictionary is due to be published in 2009.

The series consists of eleven sub-series:
A. Research
B. Field notes
C. Administrative records
D. Publications
E. Village life photographs
F. Modern basket weavers’ photographs
G. Counting book photographs
H. Historical photographs and artefacts
I. Photographs of La Push folks
J. Audio recordings
K. Quinault materials

Kwak’wala

The series contains records created during a number of visits and projects completed with the Kwakwaka'wakw of Alert Bay.

After meeting David Grubb at the Salish Conferences in the early 1970s, Jensen was invited by Grubb to attend a potlatch on Gilford Island, just off Alert Bay.  It was the first potlatch that she attended, and Jensen photographed it in black and white without flash.

Around the same time, Gloria Cranmer Webster began involving her UBC colleague Powell in discussions on the development of a Kwak’wala orthography. The two worked on this project during their breaks at work, with the main end goal to create accurate labels for artefacts at the museum, then located in the basement of the library on campus.

In 1975, after she moved back to Alert Bay, Webster contacted Powell and asked him to assist her in the creation of a language and culture book for Kwak’wala speaking people. Powell travelled to Alert Bay, the first of many trips to do such work. Over the next few years, Powell and Jensen were invited to Alert Bay on a number of occasions to attend potlatches, pole raisings, and other community events. Jensen photographed the events, as well as other aspects of the community such as the day care and band school.

In 1980 Webster, on behalf of the U’Mista Cultural Centre, secured salaries for both Jensen and Powell for one full year. They were hired to produce language and culture books, but in reality helped with many other aspects leading to the opening of the Centre. They rented a house in the village and lived there full time for the year, immersing themselves in the community, and creating a body of records that integrates both work and community life. Jensen had permission to photograph extensively, and these are all included in this series. Powell did linguistic research and worked with teachers from both the band school and the provincial school that were located in the village. Jensen also photographed language and culture lessons to be used in the books being produced. During the year they lived in Alert Bay, they produced 12 language books and a teacher’s manual for U’mista.

In 1982 Powell and Jensen purchased a house in Alert Bay, further cementing their intentions to maintain connections to the community. They continued to attend and photograph events and potlatches between projects.

In 1983 the Kwak’wala Teacher Training Program (KTTP) was developed by Powell and Jensen. The program was a college credit course for local area teachers to train them to lead language and culture lessons in their classes. Jensen and Powell divided their teaching duties, involving another teacher named Joy Wild. The program was successful for two years.

Over the next 20 years many of their visits were social in nature, although they continued to keep a detailed record of the events they attended. In 2001 they completed a CD-ROM for the Learning Kwak’wala series. This project had been ongoing for some time.

The series also contains photographic records of two events that took place outside the realm of the language projects. The Canadian Museum of Civilisation hired Doug Cranmer to carve a new Wakas Pole to replace the decaying version in Stanley Park and contacted Jensen to document the event. The second set of photographs records a trip organised by U’Mista Cultural Centre for scholars and experts to visit Mimkwamlis (Village Island) and T’sadzis’nukwakme’ (New Vancouver).

The records kept in this series consist of recordings, photographs, research notes, draft teaching aids, and copies of completed resources for both children’s education and the KTTP.

The series consists of eleven sub-series:
A. U’Mista research/background
B. Research materials
C. Field notes
D. Publications
E. Kwak’wala teacher training program
F. Kwak’wala CD-ROM project
G. Kwak’wala photographs
H. Potlatch photographs.
I. Wakas pole raising in Stanley Park 1987 photographs
J. Trip to Village Island and New Vancouver photographs 2005.
K. Audio recordings

Shuswap

Series consists of records pertaining to the development of Shushwap Language books and a teacher’s manual.

In the summer of 1979 Jensen and Powell moved to Alkali Lake for the summer to begin the Shuswap project.  The work later expanded to include the communities of Soda Creek, Dog Creek, Canim Lake and Sugar Cane.  Their primary language resources were Phyllis Chelsea and Celina Harry for the younger students’ books, and Phyllis Chelsea, Celina Harry, Cecelia DeRose, May Dixon, Elizabeth Pete, Minnie Phillips, Margaret Gilbert, Lucy Archie, Sharon Paul, and Cecile Harry for the older students’ book.  In the latter part of the project Powell and Jensen also developed a curriculum with Joy Wild, and produced a teacher’s manual.

The series consists of seven sub-series:
A. Project records phase I
B. Project records phase II
C. Research
D. Original manuscripts for publications
E. Shuswap Teacher Training
F. Photographs and slides
G. Recordings.

Northwest Coast research

Series consists of materials Duff created and gathered on various Northwest Coast tribes including Haida, Tlingit, Tsimshian and Kwakiutl. The documents include handwritten notes, typed articles, correspondence and reference materials such as photographs from other museums, Photostats and reprints and originals of articles.

Missionary resources

Series consist of bibles, hymns, and scriptures referred to throughout Rev. Crosby’s personal and missionary activities. Series includes ephemera removed from The Holy Bible Old & New Testaments. Ephemera consists of documents such as: a letter from The Lord’s Day Alliance of Canada; a letter from the Department of Temperance, Prohibition and Moral Reform of the Methodist Church; a small flower cut-out; a note written by Crosby regarding population sizes; and articles titled “Heaven: What is it like,” “Trusting the Weaver,” “Good Resolutions/ Liquor Arithmetic – Object Lesson,” “Mission Work in British Columbia,” “Guardian” (written by Crosby), “Holiness in San Antonio,” “The Young Disciple,” “The Wealth of the West and the Safety of the Sabbath,” and “Calvary/Eternity.” Series also includes two embroidered and one non-embroidered fabric strips used as bookmarks.

ITEM LIST (with box-folder number, title, and dates):
3 [Oversized box] : Methodist Hymn Book, [186-] – [191-]
3 [Oversized box] : Holy Bible Maps, [186-] – [191-]
3 [Oversized box] : Hymns Ancient & Modern No.34, 1860 – 1871
3 [Oversized box] : A New Concordance to the Holy Scriptures, 1874
3 [Oversized box] : Holy Bible Old & New Testaments, [186-] – [191-]
3 [Oversized box] : Thomas Crosby Friendship’s Gift [embroidered bookmark], [186-] – [191-]
2-15 : Missionary resources – Ephemera, 1874 – [191-]
2-16 : Missionary resources – bookmarks, 1863 – [191-]

Thomas Crosby

UBC and anthropological research

Files in this series relate to the various roles Harry Hawthorn has fulfilled at the University of British Columbia as an anthropologist, a professor (and later head of the Anthropology department), and as the first Director of the Museum of Anthropology. This series consists of correspondence, slides, photographs, negatives and research notes.

The correspondence files primarily relate to the general administration of the Museum of Anthropology by Dr. Hawthorn, including correspondence related to the museum’s collections, potential acquisitions, museum funding, the official name of the museum and the establishment of a new site for the museum. Additionally, there is also correspondence regarding the proposed development of the Indian Historical-Cultural Village, correspondence with other museums, letters asking for Dr. Hawthorn’s expert advice regarding objects, and correspondence with Wilson Duff. Included is correspondence between H. Hawthorn and Bert Robson relating to Hawthorn’s trip in the northeastern region of B.C.

Slides, photographs, negatives and notes relate to the various research trips undertaken by Hawthorn in B.C. from the late 1940s to the late 1950s. Some slides document a totem pole salvage expedition on Anthony Island, B.C. in 1957. Some of these slides were used in the production of George MacDonald’s book, Ninstints: A World Heritage Site. Other slides document miscellaneous events relating to Museum of Anthropology exhibitions and research, as well as other events such as Sports Day on the grounds of the Alberni Residential School and the carving of a 20’ long 2’ wide canoe, which took place at a regatta on May 24, 1948. Series includes negatives of totem poles, stories collected from Mungo Martin and notes, mostly written in an indigenous language.

Bill Reid

Series consists of records created and collected by McLennan relating to Bill Reid and his art held both in private collections and at the MOA. Projects included in these records are the installation of Raven and the First Men in the MOA and The Spirit of Haida Gwaii at the Vancouver International Airport. Photographs also document jewelry designed by Bill Reid, along with small sculptures, large scale sculptures, ivory and argillite works and drums.

Images: Stone B.C. records

Correspondence, news clippings, installation and exhibition photographs, and press kits from the Images: Stone: B.C. exhibit that was displayed at the Vancouver Art Gallery and the Greater Victoria Art Gallery. Also includes 2 cassette tapes from the Vancouver Art Gallery dated May 6, 1975 and 1 U-Matic videocassette titled “Images: Stone B.C.: Hilary Stewart, Wilson Duff” dated May 16, 1975.

Research notes and materials

Hand-written and typed materials by Duff, possibly compiled during research for lectures or publications. The records cover a variety of topics, including population distribution and native cultures, and six bracelet molds.

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