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Resting on a log

Image depicts four adults, wearing western clothing and regalia, resting on a log next to a parked car.

Pole of Gurhsan, Gitsegyukla

Image depicts a totem pole erected in a farming area. It stands behind a rail fence and in front of a wooden barn. Read's notes state: "The Owl, or Grave-of-Gurhsan, form representation of the mythic owl. The pole dates from about 1913, was carved by Arthur Wilson, of Larksail phratry."

Pole of Mawlarhen, close up

Image depicts a close up of a totem pole, depicting the face of a human-like figure at its base. Read's note indicates this is the Pole of Mawlarhen at Gitsegyukla. "Raven at top; half pole uncarved; then large eagle, with folded wings; sitting frog; frog hanging with head down; bottom, the Man of the Comb whose hands, raised with palms forward are like native combs. Pole c1925, was about 40 years old. Erected to commemorate Mawlarhen and his sister Poking Bullhead. Carver local artist, Jimmy Good of the Fireweed phratry." See also item a034838 for another view of this pole.

Two totem poles

Image depicts two poles standing in an open area. The front pole features a human-like creature on visible portion. The back pole also includes a human figure at the bottom with an owl on top. The figures on the bottom may be crest figures (Leading In or Halfway Out) or a Man of the Wild. Read's note suggests that one of these may be a Pole of Hrkyadet at Kispiox.

Three totem poles

Image depicts three totem poles, standing in an open area. Reads note under this photo indicates that the pole on the left may by a Snag-of-the-Sand-Bar pole from the House of Chief Skogum Laxhe. The pole on the right may be Chief Laxhes Hat-of-Tsagyem-hanak Pole. See also item a034837 for a closeup of the Snag-of-the-Sand-Bar pole.

Read Notes

Read's note cards detail information about three groups of totem poles and contain text and page references to Marius Barbeau's book, Totem Poles of the Gitksan, Upper Skeena River, British Columbia (published by the Canada Department of Mines and the National Museum of Canada, 1929).

Old house posts, Hope Island

Image of two old house posts on Hope Island, BC. The post on the right appears to be the same as a post now housed at the Museum of Anthropology, that was collected from Hope Island in 1956. Both posts feature a human figure with large eyes. On one post, the figure is holding a small face near its waist. On the other post, the figure is holding what appears to be an animal of some kind. The Museum of Anthropology's website provides the following description of the posts: "The posts of the unfinished house of Ha'm'cit were carved by a man from Smith Inlet called Si.wit who moved to Xu'mtaspi and married Tom Omhyid's mother. Ha'm'cit died before the house was finished. (Information provided to Prof. Wilson Duff by Mungo Martin). The artist's potlatch name was P'aczsmaxw. Wayne Suttles places the Xu'mtaspi village as Nahwitti, in historic times, however it was occupied jointly by the Nahwitti, the Yalhinuxw, and the Noqemqilisala (of Hanson Lagoon)."

House posts and beam, Quatsino, BC

Image of the houseposts and beam of what once was a longhouse in Quatsino, BC, on the north end of Vancouver Island. These posts appear to be the same as posts now houses at the Museum of Anthropology (museum item number A50009 a-c). The poles are described on the museum's webiste: "Two upright posts and crossbeam that were part of a large interior house frame (also see records d-f and g-h). The uprights depict sea lions carved in high relief and painted (parts a-b). Their heads are equal size to their bodies. Both part a and b have an eagle in profile within the sea lions front flippers. Part a has a top portion of a face painted on the back of its head that is part of a sisiutl that runs down the seal lions back and into its hind flipper with a serpent's head in each. The cross-beam (part c) is painted and carved as a supernatural double-headed sea lion. All parts are painted black and white with Northwest Coast stylized forms... The Klix'ken (sea lion) House was commissioned by Tza'kyius around 1906, and was the last old style house erected in Xwatis. The beams and figures stood as part of a house frame, and acted as structural supports. Figures represented on house frames were supernatural beings which the family living in the house had the right, through their history and origins, to represent."

Bear, wolf, and frog totem pole, Anthony Island

Image of a totem pole on Anthony Island, Haida Gwaii. This appears to be a pole now housed at the Museum of Anthropology (museum item #A50018). This museum item is described as follows: "Base section of a wooden pole, crescent-shaped in cross section and carved in shallow and deep relief. From the top down: a large seated bear with a small wolf between and in its ears and a downward facing frog emerging from the bear’s mouth. In between its arms and legs is a downward facing wolf... Stood outside at the center of the Mountain House, which belonged to the lineage of 'Those Born in the Southern Part of the Islands' of the Eagle Moiety of the Kunghit Haida. Stood near the centre of the village facing the beach along a small bay on the east side of Anthony Island. Island and village also called Skunggwai, or Red Cod Island."

Haida park UBC

Image of Haida totem poles and a Haida that stand outside the Museum of Anthropology.

Haida Pk., UBC

Image of the Haida house at the Museum of Anthropology while it was being constructed.

Alert Bay memorial pole

Image of a memorial pole at Alert Bay. Inscription at the bottom held by the figure reads "In loving memory of Tlaowa Latle of the Qiowasudinuk (Kwakwaka'wakw: Kwikwasut'inuxw) Tribe. Died Nov. 9 [rest of inscription illegible].

William Carr

House of Chief Albert Harry

Item is a photograph showing the family and relatives of Chief Albert Harry. From left to right: Kitty Harry, Albert Harry, Ned Wesley, Thomas Hailhemas and Mary Johnson-Walkus.

C. MacKay

Interview with Bill Reid about Celebration of the Raven Part 1

Item is the first of a three part sound recording of an interview with Bill Reid about the origins of his carving The Raven and the First Men, located at MOA. The interviewer is unknown. During the interview Bill Reid discusses how the sculpture was the result of a highly collaborative process involving other artists, his impression of the location of the carving in MOA, and his working relationship with Walter C. Koerner who commissioned the sculpture. He lastly discusses his representation and interpretation of the Haida legend that the carving is based on. This recording is part of Celebration of the Raven which documented the creation of the Raven and the First Men Sculpture, its relocation to the Museum of Anthropology, and the unveiling by the Prince of Wales in 1982.

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