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Canada Kwakwaka'wakw
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Ravens and Robins With Shields Won in Intramural Competition at St. Michael's Residential School

Item is a hand-tinted glass lantern slide of twenty children and one adult holding house pennants with the names "Robins" and "Ravens" and shields in front of a building. Item is a duplicated of item no. S7-60, fonds 008 Missionary Society of the Church of England in Canada (MSCC) fonds, from the Anglican Church of Canada General Synod Archives. According to description from the Anglican Church of Canada General Synod Archives, Ravens (senior girls) and Robins (junior girls) pose with the shields won in intramural competition. The Anglican Church established a day school at its mission in Alert Bay, British Columbia in 1878. It opened a small boarding school there in 1882 and an industrial school in 1894. In 1929, a new building was constructed. The school was known for the arts and crafts produced by the students and the two large totem poles in front of the school building. In 1947, two-dozen children ran away from the school. The subsequent investigation into conditions at the school led to the resignation of both the principal and the vice-principal. By 1969, when the federal government assumed administration of the school, all residents were attending local schools. The residence closed in 1974. (National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation)

Children Playing at St. Michael's Residential School

Item is a hand-tinted glass lantern slide of five children in playing attitude with the sea in the background. Based on the original order of the collection, photograph might have been taken in Alert Bay and the children might have been students at St. Michael's Residential School. The Anglican Church established a day school at its mission in Alert Bay, British Columbia in 1878. It opened a small boarding school there in 1882 and an industrial school in 1894. In 1929, a new building was constructed. The school was known for the arts and crafts produced by the students and the two large totem poles in front of the school building. In 1947, two-dozen children ran away from the school. The subsequent investigation into conditions at the school led to the resignation of both the principal and the vice-principal. By 1969, when the federal government assumed administration of the school, all residents were attending local schools. The residence closed in 1974. (National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation)

Kwakiutl, raven totem pole #3, Totem Park, UBC, Vancouver

Carved by Charlie James c. 1900 (Fort Rupert). Collected by Marius Barbeau and Arthur Price. The pole was re-adzed and re-painted by Kwakwaka'wakw carver Mungo Martin before shipping in 1947. Repainted and repaired by Ellen Neel (1949) and by Mungo Martin (1950-51). It stood at Totem Pole Park, UBC Campus until it was re-located to the Museum's Great Hall c. 1976.

Totem Park, UBC, Vancouver, Kwakiutl (#2 + 5 carved by Mungo Martin), Alert Bay sea lion pole #2, new Mungo Martin pole #5, frontal pole #6, eagle crest pole #7

This pole was on display at UBC in Totem Park in the 1960’s and 1970’s and moved to the Museum in the late 1970’s. It was carved in 1914 in Tsaxis (Fort Rupert) by George Hunt Sr. for the Edward S. Curtis film "In the Land of the War Canoes" which was originally titled "In the Land of the Head Hunters". The pole was collected by Marius Barbeau and Arthur Price in 1947. The pole was repaired and re-painted by carvers Ellen Neel in 1949 and Mungo Martin in 1950-51. It stood at Totem Park, UBC Campus until it was re-located to the Museum's Great Hall in 1976.

Iconography: Kolus is a young thunderbird. Thunderbird is a supernatural bird identifiable by the presence of ear-like projections or horns on the head, and a re-curved beak. The pole alludes to the story of Tongas people in south Alaska, who migrated south.

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