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Alert Bay Kwakwaka'wakw
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Book 5: Learning Kwak'wala The Sounds of Kwak'wala

Item consists of a recording of Learning Kwak'wala: Book 5 The Sounds of Kwak'wala, and it features Agnes Cranmer, Margaret Cook, and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer and Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak’wala; Side A: pages 5-28, covers the names of most of the Kwak'wala speaking peoples and their dialects, the Kwak'wala alphabet, how to pronounce vowels, consonants, the glottal stop, and the barred Side B: pages 29-52, continues with how to pronounce the barred L, and covers the rest of the consonants, back consonant sounds, rounded consonant sounds, explosive consonant sounds, and double letter sounds, one English translation on page 33 refers to the cedar bark daces as "Indian dancing," also the English translation for someone of African descent on page 45 uses the word "Negro." Recorded on both sides.

Book 7, tape 2: Learning Kwak'wala

Item consists of a recording of Learning Kwak'wala: Book 7 This One That One, and it features Agnes Cranmer, Margaret Cook, and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer and Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak’wala; Side A: pages 26-40, starts with exercises for buying something that is or is not in sight, and continues with who something is for when they are or are not present, the grammar for doing something and the subject is either present or absent, past tense forms, future tense forms, pointer words, action words without objects, and action words that take objects; Side B: pages 40-57, continues past tense exercises on page 40, and covers how to say and adjective does not apply to someone, when someone is not doing something, the words for very and really, positive and negative answer patterns, grammar to ask what someone is doing, and what someone did in the past. Recorded on both sides.

Book 8, tape 1: Learning Kwak'wala

Item consists of part 1 a recording of Learning Kwak'wala: Book 8 Here & There and it features Agnes Cranmer, Margaret Cook, and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer and Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak’wala; Side A: pages 4-13, and covers singular and plural endings, where someone is going, and where someone went; Side B: pages 14-24, continues how to express where some one is and what they are doing, and covers when someone is going somewhere, and how to tell the time. Recorded on both sides.

Book 8, tape 2: Learning Kwak'wala

Item consists of part 2 of a recording of Learning Kwak’wala: Book 8 Here & There, and it features Agnes Cranmer, Margaret Cook, and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer and Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak’wala; Side A: pages 25-33 covers where people are, when they arrived and where items are, Agnes Cranmer provides another word for Vancouver in Kwak’wala that is not listed on page 27; Side B: pages 33-43 covers the locations of items in or on an object ad provides a distinction between small and larger locations. Recorded on both sides, page numbers in the audio are ahead by one and two page numbers from the physical workbook, and the list of vocabulary is in a slightly different order than the workbook. Recorded on both sides.

Book 3: Me & My Clothes, Learning Kwak'wala

Item consists of a recording of the Learning Kwak’wala book 3, Me & My Clothes, and it features Agnes Cranmer, Margaret Cook and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer and Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak’wala; Side A: pages 4-26 , goes over parts of the body, whether or not they hurt, types of clothes, who the items belong to, where items are, different types of hats, colors, if the clothes are new, and numbers, and clothing worn at ceremonies (the vocabulary is on page 26 but the audio says pages 24-25 have the list) audio stops abruptly after the list. ; Side B: pages 24, 28-30, goes over the types of Kwakwa̱ka̱ʼwakw dances and how well someone can perform them, and the grammar to describe things "right at hand" and things "further away but visible, briefly refers to Kwakwa̱ka̱ʼwakw dances as "Indian Dances" in the English translation of the sentences. While Jay Powell says that the rest of the tape is a recording for Book 5, there was no other audio after that point. Recorded on both sides.

Book 4: Learning Kwak'wala, Dogs, Cats and Crows

Item consists of a recording of the Learning Kwak’wala book 4: Dogs, Cats and Crows, and it features Agnes Cranmer, Margaret Cook, and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer and Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak’wala; Side A: pages 33 and 4-13, begins with the Kwak’wala alphabet and covers numbers, the names of animals, how to express if someone does or does not have an animal, how to describe animals; Side B: pages 12-29, continues with farm animals and covers woodland animals, birds, sea animals and items found on beaches, and how to express hunger. Recorded on both sides.

Killer Whale arch, Alert Bay cemetery

View of the Killer Whale Arch located at the entrance to the Kwatiul Indian Cemetery. This arch is a memorial to a boy lost at sea. Located at Alert Bay, British Columbia. Several crosses and memorial totem poles are visible behind this archway.

Tall totem pole, Alert Bay, BC

Photograph of a totem pole in Alert Bay, BC. This pole has been called the world's tallest totem pole, though this is a disputed fact since it is actually comprised of two pieces. The pole is not specific to a particular family, but represents multiple tribes of the Kwakwaka'wakw. The pole was completed in the late 1960's and raised in 1973. It is located near the Big House.

Mildred Laurie

From all over the place [raising totem, Alert Bay]

Image of a totem pole in Alert Bay, BC, at the grave of the Kwakiutl Chief Mungo Martin. The pole was carved to honor the Chief. This image shows the pole right after it has been raised, with the ropes used to raise it still attached. Additional information and images of this pole are featured on pages 28-33 of Carter's book "From History's Locker."

Anthony Carter

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