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Fishing
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Fishing [photos]

These photographs were originally housed in a small box, filed by subjects. The photographs have been rehoused into archival sleeves, but the groupings and subject names have been retained.

Cowichan salmon weir

File consists of images of a salmon weir on the Cowichan River, Vancouver Island. Some images show individuals on or near the weir with spears. Also included is an image of a salmon store or drying shed, and Carter's wife sitting near salmon that is being barbecued.

Anthony Carter

Cowichan salmon weir

Image of a salmon weir on the Cowichan River, Vancouver Island. The weir is seen from a slight distance up or down the river.

Anthony Carter

Cowichan salmon weir

mage of three individuals standing on the platform of a fishing weir on the Cowichan River, holding spears. A similar image is printed on page 15 of Carter's book "From History's Locker," with the caption: "Salmon weir on the Cowichan river, the native people continue a very ancient form of spear fishing for migrating salmon. The weir is not a trap but merely a means to slow the fish on the way up the river."

Anthony Carter

Cowichan salmon weir

mage of three individuals standing on the platform of a fishing weir on the Cowichan River, holding spears. A similar image is printed on page 15 of Carter's book "From History's Locker," with the caption: "Salmon weir on the Cowichan river, the native people continue a very ancient form of spear fishing for migrating salmon. The weir is not a trap but merely a means to slow the fish on the way up the river."

Anthony Carter

Cowichan salmon weir

mage of three individuals standing on the platform of a fishing weir on the Cowichan River, holding spears. A similar image is printed on page 15 of Carter's book "From History's Locker," with the caption: "Salmon weir on the Cowichan river, the native people continue a very ancient form of spear fishing for migrating salmon. The weir is not a trap but merely a means to slow the fish on the way up the river."

Anthony Carter

Cowichan salmon weir

Image of a wooden building with a sign hanging from the front of it that says "Salmon for Survival." The building appears to be a place where salmon is processed, dried, and/or sold. It is located next to a creek or low lying river.

Anthony Carter

Cowichan salmon weir

mage of three individuals standing on the platform of a fishing weir on the Cowichan River, holding spears. A similar image is printed on page 15 of Carter's book "From History's Locker," with the caption: "Salmon weir on the Cowichan river, the native people continue a very ancient form of spear fishing for migrating salmon. The weir is not a trap but merely a means to slow the fish on the way up the river."

Anthony Carter

Cowichan salmon weir

mage of three individuals standing on the platform of a fishing weir on the Cowichan River, holding spears. A similar image is printed on page 15 of Carter's book "From History's Locker," with the caption: "Salmon weir on the Cowichan river, the native people continue a very ancient form of spear fishing for migrating salmon. The weir is not a trap but merely a means to slow the fish on the way up the river."

Anthony Carter

River fishing

Image depicts a man standing on a river bank holding a long pole over the river. He appears to have caught a fish and to be bringing it in. A pile of fish sit on the riverbank.

Drying Fish

Image depicts a rack set up in a clearing where fish appear to be drying. The area around the rack is scrub land and mountains can be seen in the distance.

Oolachan fishing, Nass River

Image depicts a group of people drying and preparing oolachan (eulachon) fish. Printed around the border of the image is the photographer information "PHOTOGRAPHED BY R. MAYNARD, VICTORIA, . . . B. C." Handwritten inscription on the verso reads "Oolachan fishing, Nass River".

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