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Exhibits

Series consists of records relating to Elizabeth Johnson's curatorial activities regarding curation (intellectual creation) and coordination (administrative project management) of exhibits hosted by and produced in whole or in part by the Museum of Anthropology, including writing exhibit catalogues. The series consists of agendas, agreements, articles, artifact and acquisition lists, artist biography, attendance figures, books, brochure, business cards, budgets, catalogue drafts, comment book, contract lists, correspondence, curators statement, diagrams, drawings, evaluations, exhibit labels, exhibit proposals, exhibit panel layouts, exhibit resource binders, expenses, installation diagrams, internal forms (consent forms and exhibit proposal forms), financial records, flyer final report, guidelines, grant applications, invitations, map, memoranda, minutes of meetings, museum exhibit diagrams, notes, object records, permission forms, photographs, photograph labels, photocopies of photographs, plans, policies, press releases, professional guidelines, proposals, publications (books), publicity records, published articles, receipts, reports, reproductions of newspaper ads and articles, research notes, research papers, revisions, schedules, slide list, slides, speaking notes, student papers, surveys, transcripts of research interviews, translations, travelling exhibit, visitor comments, visitor surveys, and videos.

The series is arranged into the following sub-series, based on specific exhibitions:
Subseries A: The Spirit of Tibet
Subseries B: Festival Hong Kong Exhibits: Contrasts and Possessions
Subseries C: Translations of Traditions
Subseries D: Repair, Re-use and Recycle
Subseries E: Open House, 1987
Subseries F: Quilting in East Asia
Subseries G: Records of the Krista Point Exhibit in the Great Hall
Subseries H: A Family Affair
Subseries I: Ancient Cloth … Ancient Code?
Subseries J: Proud to be Musqueam
Subseries K: Hands of Our Ancestors
Subseries L: A Rare Flower
Subseries M: Unity Quilt
Subseries N: Chinese Peasant Textiles Art: Kwantung and Szechuan Provinces
Subseries O: Gallery 3
Subseries P: Nunavutmiutanik Elisasiniq
Subseries Q: Repatriation Panels
Subseries R: Wearing Politics
Subseries S: What is Canadian cultural property?
Subseries T: My Ancestors are still Dancing
Subseries U: Gathering Strength exhibit: Musqueam Weavers

Elizabeth Lominska Johnson

Collections

Series consists of records created, received, and or used by Elizabeth Johnson for collections management at the Museum of Anthropology. Records include Anthropology 431 syllabus, area committee records, articles, budgets, cataloguing procedures, committee records, correspondence, draft guidelines, draft policies and procedures, ethnology collection storage statistics, job description, job posting, insurance, loan forms, memoranda, minutes, notes, object lists, photographs, professional guidelines, project overviews, reports, research notes, surveys, transcripts of research interviews, workshop outlines, and administrative and financial records.

The series is arranged into the following subseries:
Subseries A: Collections’ administrative and operational files
Subseries B: Textile collections’ records
Subseries C: VA projects
Subseries D: Francis Williams Project
Subseries E: Provenancial Inquires

Elizabeth Lominska Johnson

Correspondence

Series consists of correspondence relating to the general administrative activities and responsibilities of Elizabeth Johnson in her capacity as Curator of Documentation, Curator of Collections, Curator of Ethnology, and as Curator of Textiles. Records include 10 colour photographs, correspondence, publications, memoranda, photocopies of contact sheets, handwritten notes, name lists, object lists and a project proposal.

Elizabeth Lominska Johnson

Museum education

Series consists of records pertaining to educational programmes offered at the University of British Columbia. Records include a programme brochure, correspondence, an unpublished essay and a participant list.

Elizabeth Lominska Johnson

Chinook Jargon

Series is made up of records relating to the creation of a Chinook Jargon dictionary, a Big Book created for the Quileute on Chinook Jargon, and lessons for a Chinook Jargon class at Langara College. Powell documented the use of Chinook Jargon in LaPush during research on the Quileute language. His informants used Chinook Jargon regularly, and he began to research the history of its use on the Northwest Coast with the intention of writing a book about it. The manuscript for his book was accepted by the publishing company Douglas and McIntyre, but as Powell was not satisfied with his work, publication did not take place. However, he did produce a number of works that have been used for education purposes in LaPush as well as in British Columbia.

Series comprises six sub-series:
A. Research materials
B. Field notes and correspondence
C. Unpublished manuscript and lessons
D. Chinook Jargon dictionary files

Gitxsan

Series documents Jensen and Powell’s work with and visits to the Gitxsan speaking villages in North Western British Columbia. Jensen and Powell worked with the Gitxsan to produce language and culture material.

Jensen’s first visit to Gitxsan territory was in 1975, before they began to work with the communities. Jensen was asked to accompany Dr. Marjorie Halpen of the Museum of Anthropology, Amelia Sussman Schultz (a former student of anthropologist Franz Boas) and UBC grad student Carol Sheehan McLaren to Prince Rupert and various Gitxsan villages. The impetus for the journey was that Schultz was interested in recovering her old dissertation notes that she left with William Beynon, a hereditary Tsimshian chief who served as ethnographer, translator, and linguistic consultant to anthropologists including Boas. Although she had never completed her dissertation, in her retirement she regretted leaving the information. During this trip Jensen photographed the Gitxsan villages through which they travelled, making special note of the burial houses and totems she encountered.

Two years later the Gitxsan band approached Jensen and Powell to create language and culture materials. Powell secured the funding through the BC Ministry of Education and the federal government.

Powell and Jensen lived and worked with the Gitxsan in the summers from 1977 to 1981. The first three years were spent focussing on what they have termed the Eastern dialect. In this period they lived and worked in Kispiox, staying in a teacherage the first year (a small apartment built for housing teachers), and moving in the second year to the back room of the house of one of their linguistic informants, Clara Harris. The third year they again lived with Clara Harris until halfway through the summer when they decided to expand the project to include the Western dialect: at this time they moved to Kitwancool (now known as Gitanyow) where they again lived in a teacherage. The final two summers they returned to Kispiox to live with Clara Harris.

Powell worked with a number of linguistic informants, including Clara Harris, Edith Gawa, and Mary Johnson for the Eastern dialect, and Solomon Marsden, with the help of Ivan Good, Maggie Good, Cindy Morgan, Edith and Abel Campbell, David Milton, Olive Mulwain, Fred Johnson and Jeffrey Morgan for the Western. The materials produced throughout the Gitxsan project are divided into Eastern and Western Gitxsan. The books produced for the Eastern dialect were called Gitxsan for Kids. The books for the Western dialect were called Learning Gitxsan. In addition to the educational material, other resources were developed including illustrated alphabet sheets, the Northwest Coast Word List (which was intended as the basis for a full dictionary, a goal that did not transpire), and the Gitxsan Teacher’s Manual.

As was the case with all the communities they lived in, Powell and Jensen found that work and recreation in small Indigenous communities blended together, and many of the activities they took part in were incorporated into the language materials produced. Jensen photographed the cultural activities they attended, and they made audio and photographic records of Elders reminiscing about what they referred to as the “old ways.” Both Jensen and Powell were adopted into Gitxsan tribes during their time living in the region: Jensen to the Firweed Clan, and Powell to the Lax Gibuu, or Wolf Clan, both of Kispiox. This series comprises all the records created during their stays in Gitxsan villages.

The series consists of nine sub-series:
A. Field notes and correspondence
B. Research
C. Published educational materials
D. Unpublished manuscripts
E. Tsimshian-Gitxsan materials
F. Eastern and Western Gitxsan recordings
G. Eastern Gitxsan photographs
H. Western Gitxsan photographs
I. Doreen Jensen
J. Gitxsan artist photographs

Tait

Series documents Nisga’a artist Norman Tait and his crew of carvers during a period in which they were prolific in their creation of totem poles.

Jensen first met Tait in the early 1970s when she would photographic artists’ works for Bud Mintz, Vancouver gallery owner. In 1985 she had the idea to produce a book documenting the carving of a totem pole from start to finish. She approached Tait, who initially refused but called Jensen back just a few days later to take her up on the offer, after being commissioned to create a pole for the Native Education Centre in Vancouver.

Jensen photographed Tait and his crew, which consisted of his brother Robert (Chip), his cousin Harry Martin (Hammy), his nephew Wayne Young and his eldest son Isaac (Ikey). She also made notes and audio recordings of Tait’s lessons to his crew, most of whom had never worked on such a large project. The photographs and tapes were used in the creation of the book Where the People Gather: Carving a Totem Pole. The project also led to the publication of a children’s version, Carving a Totem Pole and a paperback version titled Totem Pole Carving. The books were published in the early 1990s.

Jensen documented Tait’s next two major commissions: two poles for Capilano Mall in 1986, and a pole for Stanley Park in 1987.

In 1987 Tait adopted Jensen into the Nisga’a Eagle Clan and began to teach her about the responsibilities that came with the honour. The lessons were put into practice in 2001 when Tait asked Vickie to guard the body of a family member that had died.

The series includes photographic records of the creation of the four poles; audio recordings of lessons and interviews with Tait; transcripts of the audio tapes; and notes. The series consists of five sub-series:

A. Native Education Centre (NEC) pole photographs
B. Capilano Mall and Stanley Park poles photographs
C. Misc. photographs
D. Tait family and crew artists’ photographs
E. Audio tapes and transcripts.

Correspondence

Series consists of two files of correspondence:

  1. Military Period (1921-1923)
  2. Other Correspondence (1961-1985)

Materials in the ‘Military Period’ file include ten letters written to, or by, Lt. Col. Parker while on duty as the Commander of the Military Forces in Tibet. Two other letters were written by Sir Charles Bell in which Bell arranges to meet up with Lt. Col. Parker and an escort on his return journey from Lhasa. One additional letter is handwritten in Tibetan and stamped with ‘British Trade Agency – Gyantse – Tibet’ (which suggests that it may be from Parker’s military period), but it is not kown who authored it or when it was created. Five of the letters are written in Tibetan and translations and transcriptions for four of the five letters are available in hard copy and on compact disc (see ‘Notes’).

Of significance among the letters written in Tibetan is correspondence from Lt. Col. Parker to the 13th Dalai Lama in which Lt. Col. Parker states that he has received and inspected the troops from the Dalai’s personal escort and suggests that they be kept for training. In this letter Lt. Col. Parker also raises question on military dress and deportment, specifically, the length of the officers’ hair (a translation of this letter was provided by Father Donald but no original copy of the translation exists). An original draft of this letter, written in English by Lt. Col. Parker, is also included in this file. A second letter is from the Dalai Lama to Lt. Col. Parker and is an acknowledgement of Parker’s training of Tibetan soldiers. This letter is written on rice paper and includes the Dalai’s official ink seal and an envelope with the Dalai’s wax seal and a postmarked Tibetan stamp. Three other letters were sent to Lt. Col. Parker from officials of the Tibetan government. These letters are also written on rice paper and ink stamped with official seals. The first of these letters is written by a member of the Tibetan Supreme Council (known as Shapes or Shapees) and is a response to Lt. Col. Parker’s questioning of hair length of the Tibetan troops, and includes explanations of cultural and religious differences. The second letter is from the minister responsible for the Tibetan military in which permission is granted for training of the Tibetan troops, and the sending of further troops to be trained. The third letter is written by two Tibetan Officers in which praise is given to one of their officers along with a request for his return. Of those letters mentioned above, translations and transcriptions are available for the letters written from the Dalai and the officials of the Tibetan government, and accompany the series.
The five other letters in this series include four that were typewritten by Lt. Col. Parker in English: two are from his military period; two others were written decades later to the editor of a publication. As mentioned above, one was written in Tibet and has not been translated. The two letters from his military period are lengthy and provide significant details of Lt. Col. Parker’s perceptions of his work, the people, the country, events and festivities and are an important accompaniment to many of the prints in Photograph Collection A.

Materials in the “Other Correspondence” file consist of more recent records. Two letters from 1961 relate to an address Lt. Col. Parker accepted to give to the Victoria Section of the Royal Over-Seas League about his experience in Tibet. The two other letters also relate to Lt. Col. Parker’s time in Tibet and were sent to the editor of “Country Life.” The first letter (dated 1966) describes Lt. Col. Parker’s unique experience of being the first European to see a Takin, “the rarest mammal in the world,” while the second letter (dated 1977) discusses a pony that Lt. Col. Parker bought in the early 1920s. The file also contains a letter (dated 1985) from the Office of Tibet in New York City acknowledging receipt of a donation for $20.00 along with a brief update on certain individuals. This letter is signed by two people; one, “T.C. Tethong,” was the translator for the 14th Dalai Lama in the 1960s.

ref # 4-1

Photographs

The series consists of over 600 hundred black-and-white photographs and negatives that relate to Lt. Col. Parker and his wife’s time in Tibet (1921- 1924), and a collection of more recent colour photographs of Tibetan objects that were collected by the couple. The majority of the b&w photographs were taken by Lt. Col. Parker during his military period, as well as the year following his release. The images depict military scenes, festivals and events, individual and group portraits, as well as various landscapes and architecture. Significant among these photographs are images of: the photographer who accompanied famed British climber, George Mallory; the Dalai Lama’s personal escort; and the first Lhasa Apso dogs out of Tibet. A small number of images (e.g., those of the Dalai Lama in 1910-1911) predate Lt. Col. Parker’s time in Tibet and are believed to have been given to him by some unknown person(s). The original photographs were not labelled; however, valuable contextual information has been provided by Father Donald, whose descriptions and commentary accompany a large number of these images (see Item List).

The prints are located in two photograph albums identified as Photograph Collections A & B. Photograph Collection A contains 243 b&w photographs, all of which are considered to be original prints. Although duplicates of images occur, these simply represent copies developed on different paper. It was reported (by Father Donald) that the last 48 photographs in this album were found loose and spread throughout Lt. Col. Parker’s papers. A total of 189 prints in Photograph Collection A have acetate negatives. Collection B contains 170 b&w photographs, of which all are considered original prints. A total of 67 b&w prints in Photograph Collection B have acetate negatives. Collection B also contains 74 colour photographs of artefacts to which there are no negatives. Duplicates of 68 b&w prints exist between the Photograph Collections A & B.

The series also includes 210 b&w negatives which correspond in number and sequence to print images found in Photograph Collection A: 193 negatives have corresponding prints; 17 negatives have no prints associated with them. A small number of negatives are duplicated. There are no negatives for the colour prints.

Accompanying the series is one compact disc (CD No. 5) consisting of 243 scanned b&w prints and 104 scanned negatives. The scanned prints also correspond in number and sequence to print images found in Photograph Collection A. Ten of the scanned negatives have acetate negatives but no prints associated with them; one scanned negative has neither acetate negative nor print (see Item List).

Publications series

Series consists of books created by or contributed to by Powell and Jensen. Many of the publications are final versions of the language education materials made for community use. A small number are publications on indigenous culture of the Northwest Coast for which Powell and Jensen were consulted, or in which Jensen’s photographs were used.

Series also contains a small number of magazine articles authored by Powell or Jensen.

Projects and events

Series consists of records created by William McLennan in the course of planning and photographing various projects and events at MOA.

Projects are considered as having a longer duration, often occuring outside of the physical museum building, and in cooperation with other bodies. McLennan often liaised with First Nation communities and artists during the planning stages of projects.

Events are considered as having occurred over a short period of time. Events were attended by McLennan as a MOA representative and photograph.

On both projects and events McLennan took on larger roles in addition to photographer such as community liason, presenting on topics, and designer. Each project and event comprises their own sub-series.

Administration, public relations and correspondence

Series consists of records relating to McLennan’s administrative role as a curator at the MOA, including public relations (interviews given, lectures given, publications about the museum and his work), annual reports and correspondence (inquiries from interested parties regarding certain artifacts, events, people and donations at the museum). The majority of this series presents itself in textual records, however there are also digital records included as well. There are a large number of digital images in the file ‘Photographs’ which depict various stages in the museum development of MOA, significant artists, MOA grounds and landscape, special events and visitors and milestone occasions.

Northwest Coast First Nations artifacts research

This series consists of graphic and textual materials related to Sawyer’s research on Northwest Coast artifacts. Graphic materials in this series include slides, photographs, and drawings of artifacts. Textual records in this series consists of research material and iconic analysis cards complied and/or accumulated by Sawyer, or by his students, regarding Northwest Coast artifacts. Other textual records include correspondence Sawyer had with various museums regarding Northwest Coast items in their collections.

This series contains four subseries titled:
A. Slides of artifacts
B. Scrapbooks
C. Museum research materials
D. Student research materials

ref # 13-1

Alan R. Sawyer

Northwest Coast First Nations artifacts research

This series consists of graphic and textual materials related to Sawyer’s research on Northwest Coast artifacts. Graphic materials in this series include slides, contact sheets, and drawings of artifacts. Textual records in this series consists of essays related to Sawyer’s research on Northwest Coast artifacts, museum catalogue lists, and iconic analysis cards complied and/or accumulated by Sawyer. Other textual records include correspondence Sawyer had with various museums regarding Northwest Coast artifacts in their collections.

This series contains four subseries titled:
A. Slides and scrapbooks of artifacts
B. Mask drawings
C. Museum research materials
D. Scholarly research

ref # 13-2

Alan R. Sawyer

Miscellaneous project records

Series documents projects Cunningham took on outside of his main roles at MOA. Cunningham was involved in MOA’s identity development in the late 1990s, and participated in shop product development around this time. He also provided external consultation to other museums and UBC departments. Included in this series is material regarding MOA exhibition cases at YVR Airport pre-dating Cunningham’s time at the museum. Records include correspondence, drawings, measurements, and photographs.

Student papers

Series consists of notes and papers written by Duff when he was an anthropology student at UBC.

Correspondence

Series consists of letters sent to Duff, occasionally accompanied by articles or manuscripts. There are a few copies of letters from Duff.

Correspondence

Series consists of a voluminous amount of communication (approximately 270 letters) between both B.C. Binning and their friends and colleagues in Japan, predominantly Bishop Kojo Sakamoto, his family, and other friends and translators. The bulk of the communication occurs mostly around September 1966 onwards, when Sakamoto’s calligraphy was the focus of an exhibit at the University of British Columbia. Correspondence is presented in the form of letters, traditional scrolls, postcards, telegrams, notes, and a small amount of newspaper clippings.

Series is arranged chronologically by date, regardless of author. There are approximately eighteen correspondences that are undated that were all authored by Bishop and Kiyoko Sakamoto. These follow the dated correspondence.

Bertram Charles (B.C.) Binning

Scrapbooks

Series consists of 6 scrapbooks assembled by the Binnings, either as commemorative souvenirs of their travels or as gifts to their Japanese friends overseas for a period of time covering over a decade. Scrapbooks consist predominantly of photographs, but also include brief notes and newspaper clippings. One file of textual records provides notes for a souvenir album assembled by B.C.

Bertram Charles (B.C.) Binning

Textual Materials

Series contains textual records contextualizing the petroglyphs and pictograms found in the graphic materials. Narrations include descriptions of the sites and their geologic evolution over the years that is leading to the loss of rock surface and petroglyphs and pictograms. Text also documents E. F. Meade’s hypothesis on how some of the petroglyphs and pictographs may have been carved and painted and his interpretations on the reasons behind the locations and purpose of some of them. The author also mentions conversations with local Indigenous peoples inquiring about the petroglyphs and pictographs and areas where he could not get documented due to issues with his equipment. Lastly, narrations include quotations and references to accounts by Capt. Vancouver, Archibald Menzies, and Alexander McKenzie describing the shore and locating some of Vancouver’s descriptions based on Meade’s knowledge of the coast and archaeology.

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