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Administration, public relations and correspondence

Series consists of records relating to McLennan’s administrative role as a curator at the MOA, including public relations (interviews given, lectures given, publications about the museum and his work), annual reports and correspondence (inquiries from interested parties regarding certain artifacts, events, people and donations at the museum). The majority of this series presents itself in textual records, however there are also digital records included as well. There are a large number of digital images in the file ‘Photographs’ which depict various stages in the museum development of MOA, significant artists, MOA grounds and landscape, special events and visitors and milestone occasions.

Bill Reid

Series consists of records created and collected by McLennan relating to Bill Reid and his art held both in private collections and at the MOA. Projects included in these records are the installation of Raven and the First Men in the MOA and The Spirit of Haida Gwaii at the Vancouver International Airport. Photographs also document jewelry designed by Bill Reid, along with small sculptures, large scale sculptures, ivory and argillite works and drums.

General research

Series consists of records created and collected by McLennan in the course of research on Northwest coast art. McLennan kept files related to research conducted in other museums and archives, on artists he came into contact with, and a series of photographs depicting art styles and objects complied and organized by culture, and ideas and research for books. Each of these comprises its own sub-series.

Multiversity galleries

Series consists of records, photographs and research related to the planning for the installation of the Multiversity Galleries at the MOA. This project was part of the Partnership of Peoples Renewal project, which expanded the MOA and renovated existing gallery space. McLennan’s role included outreach to First Nations communities. In cases where members of the community could not travel to MOA, McLennan would travel to them bringing with him binders which were assembled to show the objects held in the MOA collections.

The First Nations communities which McLennan included as part of the community consultation process include: Comox, Kitselas, Stl’atl’imx/Lillooet/ Lil’wat/St’at’imc, Nlaka’pamux, Gitksan, Haida, Wet’suwet’en, Haisla, Secwepemc, Squamish, In-SHUCK-ch, Nuxalk, Heiltsuk, Tsimshian, Nisga’a, Salish, Comox and Kwakwaka’wakw.

Projects and events

Series consists of records created by William McLennan in the course of planning and photographing various projects and events at MOA.

Projects are considered as having a longer duration, often occuring outside of the physical museum building, and in cooperation with other bodies. McLennan often liaised with First Nation communities and artists during the planning stages of projects.

Events are considered as having occurred over a short period of time. Events were attended by McLennan as a MOA representative and photograph.

On both projects and events McLennan took on larger roles in addition to photographer such as community liason, presenting on topics, and designer. Each project and event comprises their own sub-series.

Exhibits

Series consists of records created by McLennan in the course of planning and designing various exhibits, both at MOA and on behalf of MOA for other institutions such as the World Expo in 1986. Each specific exhibit comprises its own sub-series. Graphic material includes photographic material depicting artifacts used in the exhibit, artifacts at other institutions that could potentially be used for exhibit, staff involved in exhibit, events held surrounding the opening and closing of an exhibit including any special ceremonies and other people and items related to the exhibit. Textual material includes label text, research conducted in order to strengthen the exhibits, correspondence between McLennan and cultural heritage institutions, administrative records (i.e. budgets and finances, schedules and time frames) and public relations materials.
Subseries 1 through subseries 64 represent an earlier time frame when McLennan’s role at MOA was more related to exhibit and graphic design than to actively curating exhibits. Subseries 65 through subseries 81 represent McLennan’s increased role as a curator of exhibits which he often researched, curated and did the exhibit design.

APEC artifacts

Series consists of material created and collected during APEC. Items include chalk, plastic ties, police tape, screwdriver, APEC delegate’s handbag, a ‘Thank you’ card from Bill Clinton, a coffee cup, saucer, and cigar butt used by Bill Clinton, and other material

Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC)

Tait

Series documents Nisga’a artist Norman Tait and his crew of carvers during a period in which they were prolific in their creation of totem poles.

Jensen first met Tait in the early 1970s when she would photographic artists’ works for Bud Mintz, Vancouver gallery owner. In 1985 she had the idea to produce a book documenting the carving of a totem pole from start to finish. She approached Tait, who initially refused but called Jensen back just a few days later to take her up on the offer, after being commissioned to create a pole for the Native Education Centre in Vancouver.

Jensen photographed Tait and his crew, which consisted of his brother Robert (Chip), his cousin Harry Martin (Hammy), his nephew Wayne Young and his eldest son Isaac (Ikey). She also made notes and audio recordings of Tait’s lessons to his crew, most of whom had never worked on such a large project. The photographs and tapes were used in the creation of the book Where the People Gather: Carving a Totem Pole. The project also led to the publication of a children’s version, Carving a Totem Pole and a paperback version titled Totem Pole Carving. The books were published in the early 1990s.

Jensen documented Tait’s next two major commissions: two poles for Capilano Mall in 1986, and a pole for Stanley Park in 1987.

In 1987 Tait adopted Jensen into the Nisga’a Eagle Clan and began to teach her about the responsibilities that came with the honour. The lessons were put into practice in 2001 when Tait asked Vickie to guard the body of a family member that had died.

The series includes photographic records of the creation of the four poles; audio recordings of lessons and interviews with Tait; transcripts of the audio tapes; and notes. The series consists of five sub-series:

A. Native Education Centre (NEC) pole photographs
B. Capilano Mall and Stanley Park poles photographs
C. Misc. photographs
D. Tait family and crew artists’ photographs
E. Audio tapes and transcripts.

Gitxsan

Series documents Jensen and Powell’s work with and visits to the Gitxsan speaking villages in North Western British Columbia. Jensen and Powell worked with the Gitxsan to produce language and culture material.

Jensen’s first visit to Gitxsan territory was in 1975, before they began to work with the communities. Jensen was asked to accompany Dr. Marjorie Halpen of the Museum of Anthropology, Amelia Sussman Schultz (a former student of anthropologist Franz Boas) and UBC grad student Carol Sheehan McLaren to Prince Rupert and various Gitxsan villages. The impetus for the journey was that Schultz was interested in recovering her old dissertation notes that she left with William Beynon, a hereditary Tsimshian chief who served as ethnographer, translator, and linguistic consultant to anthropologists including Boas. Although she had never completed her dissertation, in her retirement she regretted leaving the information. During this trip Jensen photographed the Gitxsan villages through which they travelled, making special note of the burial houses and totems she encountered.

Two years later the Gitxsan band approached Jensen and Powell to create language and culture materials. Powell secured the funding through the BC Ministry of Education and the federal government.

Powell and Jensen lived and worked with the Gitxsan in the summers from 1977 to 1981. The first three years were spent focussing on what they have termed the Eastern dialect. In this period they lived and worked in Kispiox, staying in a teacherage the first year (a small apartment built for housing teachers), and moving in the second year to the back room of the house of one of their linguistic informants, Clara Harris. The third year they again lived with Clara Harris until halfway through the summer when they decided to expand the project to include the Western dialect: at this time they moved to Kitwancool (now known as Gitanyow) where they again lived in a teacherage. The final two summers they returned to Kispiox to live with Clara Harris.

Powell worked with a number of linguistic informants, including Clara Harris, Edith Gawa, and Mary Johnson for the Eastern dialect, and Solomon Marsden, with the help of Ivan Good, Maggie Good, Cindy Morgan, Edith and Abel Campbell, David Milton, Olive Mulwain, Fred Johnson and Jeffrey Morgan for the Western. The materials produced throughout the Gitxsan project are divided into Eastern and Western Gitxsan. The books produced for the Eastern dialect were called Gitxsan for Kids. The books for the Western dialect were called Learning Gitxsan. In addition to the educational material, other resources were developed including illustrated alphabet sheets, the Northwest Coast Word List (which was intended as the basis for a full dictionary, a goal that did not transpire), and the Gitxsan Teacher’s Manual.

As was the case with all the communities they lived in, Powell and Jensen found that work and recreation in small Indigenous communities blended together, and many of the activities they took part in were incorporated into the language materials produced. Jensen photographed the cultural activities they attended, and they made audio and photographic records of Elders reminiscing about what they referred to as the “old ways.” Both Jensen and Powell were adopted into Gitxsan tribes during their time living in the region: Jensen to the Firweed Clan, and Powell to the Lax Gibuu, or Wolf Clan, both of Kispiox. This series comprises all the records created during their stays in Gitxsan villages.

The series consists of nine sub-series:
A. Field notes and correspondence
B. Research
C. Published educational materials
D. Unpublished manuscripts
E. Tsimshian-Gitxsan materials
F. Eastern and Western Gitxsan recordings
G. Eastern Gitxsan photographs
H. Western Gitxsan photographs
I. Doreen Jensen
J. Gitxsan artist photographs

Kwak’wala

The series contains records created during a number of visits and projects completed with the Kwakwaka'wakw of Alert Bay.

After meeting David Grubb at the Salish Conferences in the early 1970s, Jensen was invited by Grubb to attend a potlatch on Gilford Island, just off Alert Bay. It was the first potlatch that she attended, and Jensen photographed it in black and white without flash.

Around the same time, Gloria Cranmer Webster began involving her UBC colleague Powell in discussions on the development of a Kwak’wala orthography. The two worked on this project during their breaks at work, with the main end goal to create accurate labels for artefacts at the museum, then located in the basement of the library on campus.

In 1975, after she moved back to Alert Bay, Webster contacted Powell and asked him to assist her in the creation of a language and culture book for Kwak’wala speaking people. Powell travelled to Alert Bay, the first of many trips to do such work. Over the next few years, Powell and Jensen were invited to Alert Bay on a number of occasions to attend potlatches, pole raisings, and other community events. Jensen photographed the events, as well as other aspects of the community such as the day care and band school.

In 1980 Webster, on behalf of the U’Mista Cultural Centre, secured salaries for both Jensen and Powell for one full year. They were hired to produce language and culture books, but in reality helped with many other aspects leading to the opening of the Centre. They rented a house in the village and lived there full time for the year, immersing themselves in the community, and creating a body of records that integrates both work and community life. Jensen had permission to photograph extensively, and these are all included in this series. Powell did linguistic research and worked with teachers from both the band school and the provincial school that were located in the village. Jensen also photographed language and culture lessons to be used in the books being produced. During the year they lived in Alert Bay, they produced 12 language books and a teacher’s manual for U’mista.

In 1982 Powell and Jensen purchased a house in Alert Bay, further cementing their intentions to maintain connections to the community. They continued to attend and photograph events and potlatches between projects.

In 1983 the Kwak’wala Teacher Training Program (KTTP) was developed by Powell and Jensen. The program was a college credit course for local area teachers to train them to lead language and culture lessons in their classes. Jensen and Powell divided their teaching duties, involving another teacher named Joy Wild. The program was successful for two years.

Over the next 20 years many of their visits were social in nature, although they continued to keep a detailed record of the events they attended. In 2001 they completed a CD-ROM for the Learning Kwak’wala series. This project had been ongoing for some time.

The series also contains photographic records of two events that took place outside the realm of the language projects. The Canadian Museum of Civilisation hired Doug Cranmer to carve a new Wakas Pole to replace the decaying version in Stanley Park and contacted Jensen to document the event. The second set of photographs records a trip organised by U’Mista Cultural Centre for scholars and experts to visit Mimkwamlis (Village Island) and T’sadzis’nukwakme’ (New Vancouver).

The records kept in this series consist of recordings, photographs, research notes, draft teaching aids, and copies of completed resources for both children’s education and the KTTP.

The series consists of eleven sub-series:
A. U’Mista research/background
B. Research materials
C. Field notes
D. Publications
E. Kwak’wala teacher training program
F. Kwak’wala CD-ROM project
G. Kwak’wala photographs
H. Potlatch photographs.
I. Wakas pole raising in Stanley Park 1987 photographs
J. Trip to Village Island and Tzatsisnukomi (New Vancouver) photographs 2005.
K. Audio recordings

Conference files

Series consists of correspondence and memoranda, reports, itineraries, agendas and other textual material related to conferences attended by Shane where she gave public presentations.

Audrey Patricia Mackay Shane

External committees files

Series consists of correspondence and memoranda, announcements, handwritten notations, guides and publications related to Shane’s participation in various committees such as the British Columbia Museums Association’s Ownership Committee and the Canadian Cultural Property Export Review Board’s Signing Expert Examiner in Ethnography. Also included are records relating to Shane’s role as the Canadian representative of the Association of College and University Museums and Galleries.

Audrey Patricia Mackay Shane

General administration files

Series consists of correspondence, memoranda, grant applications, forms, guides, budget discussions, minutes from Curators’ meetings, notes from staff retreats relating to policies and procedures, job descriptions and institutional goals and other textual material relating to the daily administrative needs of the Museum. Included are a certificate of recognition, correspondence with the Cultural Property Import and Export Board, guides to cataloguing and classification systems and correspondence with UBC’s computing centre as well as the Department of Anthropology regarding the Museum’s computer needs.

Audrey Patricia Mackay Shane

Papers/teaching/lecture files

Series consists of correspondence memoranda, reports, student evaluations of Anthropology 431, articles, lecture notes, slides and other textual material mostly related to Shane’s teaching responsibilities in Anthropology 431, Museum Principles and Methods. Also included are copies of Shane’s papers for various publications, c.v.’s, book reviews, public lectures and materials for volunteer training seminars taught by Shane.

Audrey Patricia Mackay Shane

Museum history files

Series consists of correspondence, memoranda, guest lists, invitations, press releases, newspaper clippings, calculations, photographs and other textual material related to various events at the Museum of Anthropology, including the Museum’s official opening in 1976 and Prince Charles’ visit to the Museum for the unveiling of The Raven. Also included are publications about the Museum written by various staff members, drafts of Audrey Hawthorn’s manuscript which was eventually published as A Labour of Love and other records relating to grant applications, research and editing for this book.

Audrey Patricia Mackay Shane

Database files

Series consists of correspondence and memoranda, lists, handwritten notations, evaluations, surveys, minutes, sample documentation cards, progress reports, location files, budgets and other textual material. Most records are related to the Museum’s participation in the National Inventory Programme (NIP), a computerized information system geared towards gathering and storing museum data as well as describing key items and collections within museums to enable retrieval of this information. The Canadian Heritage Information Network (CHIN) succeeded the NIP in 1984.

Audrey Patricia Mackay Shane

Project files

Series consists of correspondence, memoranda, proposals, drafts, research notes, draft text for exhibit labels, sketches, postcards and other textual material relating to numerous projects undertaken by Shane and others in the Museum. Includes records relating to the expansion of the Museum, Museum postcards, special projects related to improving corridor cases, access to totem poles and exhibits.

Audrey Patricia Mackay Shane

Collections files

Series consists of correspondence and memoranda, contracts, budgets, minutes from Collections Committee meetings, schedules, photographs, negatives and other textual records related to the organization and maintenance of the Museum’s collections. Includes files relating to acquisitions, cataloguing, policies, storage, interns, museum assistants and field collection.

Audrey Patricia Mackay Shane

Exhibition files

Series consists of correspondence and memoranda, reports, handwritten notations, draft copies, cue cards, comment book, photographs, negatives, contact sheets, slides, application grants specific to exhibitions and other textual and graphic records related to the preparation of exhibitions within the Museum.

Audrey Patricia Mackay Shane

APEC photographs

Series consists of photographs of, in, and around The Museum of Anthropology during the APEC Leaders’ Meeting, including images of the APEC leaders, protesters, and the staff at MOA.

Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC)

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