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British Columbia Item Kwakwaka'wakw
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Alert Bay memorial pole

Image of a memorial pole at Alert Bay. Inscription at the bottom held by the figure reads "In loving memory of Tlaowa Latle of the Qiowasudinuk (Kwakwaka'wakw: Kwikwasut'inuxw) Tribe. Died Nov. 9 [rest of inscription illegible].

William Carr

Alert Bay memorial pole

Image of a memorial pole at Alert Bay. Inscription at the bottom held by the figure reads "In loving memory of Tlaowa Latle of the Qiowasudinuk (Kwakwaka'wakw: Kwikwasut'inuxw) Tribe. Died Nov. 9 [rest of inscription illegible].

William Carr

Alert Bay memorial pole

Image of a memorial pole at Alert Bay. Inscription at the bottom held by the figure reads "In loving memory of Tlaowa Latle of the Qiowasudinuk (Kwakwaka'wakw: Kwikwasut'inuxw) Tribe. Died Nov. 9 [rest of inscription illegible].

William Carr

Alert Bay memorial pole

Image of a memorial pole at Alert Bay. Inscription at the bottom held by the figure reads "In loving memory of Tlaowa Latle of the Qiowasudinuk (Kwakwaka'wakw: Kwikwasut'inuxw) Tribe. Died Nov. 9 [rest of inscription illegible].

William Carr

Book 3 Me & My Clothes Tape 3 Learning Kwak'wala

Item consists of a recording of the Learning Kwak’wala book 3, Me & My Clothes, and it features Agnes Cranmer, Margaret Cook and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer and Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak’wala; Side A: pages 4-26 , goes over parts of the body, whether or not they hurt, types of clothes, who the items belong to, where items are, different types of hats, colors, if the clothes are new, and numbers, and clothing worn at ceremonies (the vocabulary is on page 26 but the audio says pages 24-25 have the list) audio stops abruptly after the list. ; Side B: pages 24, 28-30, goes over the types of Kwakwa̱ka̱ʼwakw dances and how well someone can perform them, and the grammar to describe things "right at hand" and things "further away but visible, briefly refers to Kwakwa̱ka̱ʼwakw dances as "Indian Dances" in the English translation of the sentences. While Jay Powell says that the rest of the tape is a recording for Book 5, there was no other audio after that point. Recorded on both sides.

Book 6 Saying Everyday Things Tape 1 Learning Kwak'wala

Item consists of a recording of the Learning Kwak’wala book 6: Saying Everyday Things, and it features Agnes Cranmer, Margaret Cook, and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer and Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak’wala; Side A: pages 6-15, covers how someone is and what they are doing,; Side B: pages 16-26, covers how someone is and what they are doing, the future tense, and the past tense. Recorded on both sides.

Charlie James totem pole

Image of totem pole carved by Charles James.

The pole was re-adzed and re-painted by Kwakwaka'wakw carver Mungo Martin before shipping to UBC in 1947. Repainted and repaired by Ellen Neel (1949) and by Mungo Martin (1950-51). It stood at Totem Pole Park, UBC Campus until it was re-located to the Museum's Great Hall ca. 1976.

Anthony Carter

Chief Johnson (90 yrs), Port Hardy BC, Kwakiutl

Image of Chief Johnson of Fort Rupert BC with an unidentified woman. A portrait of Johnson from what appears to be the same photoshoot is printed on page 36 of Carter's book "From History' locker," with the caption: "? He is the Head Chief over all Kwakiutl Nation, his Indian name is 'Kla-Kwa-Gila' which means, 'Place where they make coppers." At 97 years he is a fine looking man."

Anthony Carter

Chief Johnson (90 yrs), Port Hardy BC, Kwakiutl

Image of Chief Johnson of Fort Rupert, BC. A similar image of him is printed on page 36 of Carter's book "From History' locker," with the caption: "? He is the Head Chief over all Kwakiutl Nation, his Indian name is 'Kla-Kwa-Gila' which means, 'Place where they make coppers." At 97 years he is a fine looking man."

Anthony Carter

Chief Johnson, Fort Rupert, Alert Bay

Image of Chief Johnson of Fort Rupert, BC. A similar image of him is printed on page 36 of Carter's book "From History's Locker," with the caption: "He is the Head Chief over all Kwakiutl Nation, his Indian name is 'Kla-Kwa-Gila' which means, 'Place where they make coppers." At 97 years he is a fine looking man."

Anthony Carter

Chief Johnson, Fort Rupert, Alert Bay

Image of Chief Johnson of Fort Rupert BC with a group of three men and one woman (all unidentified). A portrait of Johnson from what appears to be the same photoshoot is printed on page 36 of Carter's book From History's Locker, with the caption: "He is the Head Chief over all Kwakiutl Nation, his Indian name is 'Kla-Kwa-Gila' which means, 'Place where they make coppers." At 97 years he is a fine looking man."

Anthony Carter

Chief Johnson, Fort Rupert, Alert Bay

Image of Chief Johnson of Fort Rupert, BC. A similar image of him is printed on page 36 of Carter's book From History's Locker, with the caption: "He is the Head Chief over all Kwakiutl Nation, his Indian name is 'Kla-Kwa-Gila' which means, 'Place where they make coppers." At 97 years he is a fine looking man."

Anthony Carter

Chief Johnson, Fort Rupert, Alert Bay

Image of Chief Johnson of Fort Rupert BC with a group of three men and one woman (all unidentified). A portrait of Johnson from what appears to be the same photoshoot is printed on page 36 of Carter's book From History's Locker, with the caption: "He is the Head Chief over all Kwakiutl Nation, his Indian name is 'Kla-Kwa-Gila' which means, 'Place where they make coppers." At 97 years he is a fine looking man."

Anthony Carter

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