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Gitxsan
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Ans'pa yaxw (Kispiox) & Gitsegukla

File consists of images of the Skeena River valley area in British Columbia, near Hazelton. Subjects include people, totem poles, scenery, and the the villages of Gitsegukla and Kitwancool.

Anthony Carter

Village People

File contains images of various First Nations Cultural groups from the Pacific Northwest. The images include negatives and slides of Northwest Coast villages, totem poles, longhouses, and First Nations peoples dressed in regalia.

Miscellaneous totem pole images

File consists of images of totem poles and other carvings, some of which were taken at the University of British Columbia. The others are unidentified.

Anthony Carter

Photographs from album

File contains images of the First Nation artists involved with the <i>Through My Eyes</i> exhibit. The images show them looking at objects in the Vancouver Museum's collection. The artists shown in the photographs are Cyril Carpenter, Ben Davidson, Robert Davidson, Norman Tait, Isabel Rorick, Doreen Jensen, Judge Alfred Scow, Lyle Wilson, Dolly Watts, Bill Reid, Glen Tallio, Richard Hunt, Terry Starr, Tim Paul, Richard Summer, Dempsey Bob, Jim Hart, and William White.

Narrative and Songs from Fort Fraser, Hagwilget, Kispiox, Shuswap

Item is an audio recording made by Wilson Duff that features narrative and songs spoken and sung in several First Nations languages.

The first segment of the recording took place on August 1, 1962 in Fort Fraser at the home of Maxime George and the language used is Dakelh; accompanying documentation states that Mr. George was away but his sister Bernadette Grey was present along with Mrs. George and her sister.

The second segment of the recording took place on August 3, 1962 in Hagwilget at the house of Pete and Bernadette Grey and the language used is Dakelh; accompanying documentation states that the main singer is Donald Gray and his wife.

The third segment of the recording took place on August 16, 1962 featuring Johnson Williams, who has a Kitwancool name of Guano and the language used is Gitxsan.

The fourth segment of the recording took place on August 16, 1962 featuring Maxime George. The fifth portion of the recording is a Kitwancool recording. The final segment of the recording features Shuswap songs.

A two page document accompanied the recording. Document text:
Carrier

  1. Fort Fraser, Aug 1, 1962. W. Duff at home of Maxine George. He was away, but his daughter Bernadette Gray, her sister, and Mrs M George were present.
    (1) Song. Same repeated
    (2) Song (very short)
    (3) Song
  2. Hagwilget, Aug 3 1962. At house of Pete and Bernadette Gray. Main singer old Donald Gray (94). His aged wife (104) also present.
    (4) Song (Sun Song)
    Not transcribed Song
    Talk about names
    (5) Song, then talk about languages
    not transcribed Song
    (6) Song, then talk of moon, explaining song
    Song, then explained Sun is traveling in the sky. Talk about peacemaking forgets next song, talk about languages
    (7) Song. Sung song, for making peace
    Song. Long song, then explained. END
  3. Kispiox August 16, 1962. John Williams, who has Kitwancool name Guno. Gitksan.
    (8) Tells Neegamks story in English, includes singing of Neegamks song
    (9) Love song
    (10) Song for welcoming guests
  4. Kispiox, same time as above. Jonathan Johnson sings his direge song
  5. Fort Fraser, August 16 1962. Maxine George, others as above, 1.
    Lahal Song
  6. Song, break, then same song to end of tape
    (reverse tape)
  7. Automobile song interpreted by Bernadette
    Hudson Bay Rum song
    Maxine George tells story of origin of mosquitoes in English
    Then same in Carrier
    Same, origin of fire, water, daylight in English
    Hymn in Carrier, repeated
    Another hymn
  8. Kitwancool recording, self explanatory
  9. Shuswap songs, self explanatory

Wilson Duff interview with Jonathan Johnson at Kispiox

Item is an audio recording of an interview by Wilson Duff with Jonathan Johnson about the geography of the Gitxsan village of Kispiox and surrounding region. According to Tribal Boundaries in the Nass Watershed by Neil J. Stewart (MOA Reading Room, call number 12.7c GIT STE), Jonathan Johnson (1902-1968) of Kispiox was from the House of Xhliimlaxha and had knowledge of territories in the Nass watershed, including his father’s territory at Gwinhagiistxw. In interviews that took place on July 6 and 7, 1965, Duff gathered information about house territories in the Nass and Skeena watersheds to produce a map showing territories and numbered sites at Kispiox, see the Wilson Duff fonds at MOA, Box/File# Mc15, File# 10-B-21.

Gitxsan

File contains historical photographs of Gitxsan villages, with a specific focus on totem poles and various buildings in the villages. There are also some images of the Gitxsan people in regalia. The textual records contain information to some of the photographs, listing the photograph's title and the museum and/or archive it originated from.

Stanley E. Read fonds

  • 94
  • Fonds
  • [1946?] - 1948

Fonds consists of scans of two albums of photographs and one enlarged photograph captured by Stanley Read during two separate vacations through interior British Columbia with his wife, Ruth. Also included in the fonds is a journal which Stanley Read used to document the daily events of one of these trips, during which Stanley and Ruth travelled through Gitksan territory/Skeena Country. The photographs capture Gitksan totem poles, people, and wilderness encountered on their travels.

Stanley E. Read

Totem pole behind a fence

Image depicts a totem pole located in a valley with mountains in the distance. The pole is probably from the Kitwanga or Kispiox villages in the Skeena Valley. This pole features a fish on top and a series of ravens interspersed with human-like characters below that. One section of the pole is not carved.

Pole of Gurhsan, Gitsegyukla

Image depicts a totem pole erected in a farming area. It stands behind a rail fence and in front of a wooden barn. Read's notes state: "The Owl, or Grave-of-Gurhsan, form representation of the mythic owl. The pole dates from about 1913, was carved by Arthur Wilson, of Larksail phratry."

Broken totem pole

Image depicts a part of a fallen totem pole, surrounded by foliage. The animal may be a wolf; it depicts teeth in an open mouth.

Series of totem poles

Image depicts several totem poles erected in an open field in front of several wooden structures, possibly houses. Read's notes indicate that these poles are the Wawsemlarhae poles at Kispiox Village in the Skeena Valley.

Poles of Ksrarom-Larhae

Image depicts two totem poles erected very close together. Read's notes indicate that these are the Poles of Ksrarom-Larhae, located in Gitsegyukl. "Snag-of-the-Sand-Bar pole. At the bottom the monster Hagwelaworh (?), a whale-like sea monster. "

Pole of Mawlarhen, close up

Image depicts a close up of a totem pole, depicting the face of a human-like figure at its base. Read's note indicates this is the Pole of Mawlarhen at Gitsegyukla. "Raven at top; half pole uncarved; then large eagle, with folded wings; sitting frog; frog hanging with head down; bottom, the Man of the Comb whose hands, raised with palms forward are like native combs. Pole c1925, was about 40 years old. Erected to commemorate Mawlarhen and his sister Poking Bullhead. Carver local artist, Jimmy Good of the Fireweed phratry." See also item a034838 for another view of this pole.

Child and totem pole

Image depicts a child leaning against the base of a totem pole. The pole shows a human figure in profile. See also item a034828 for another view of this pole.

According to George Read, Stanley Read's son, the pole in the image is the Half Way Out pole of Delgamuukw's house; the boy is Harry Brown, whose Gitxsan name is Xsuwii 'Guus.

Child and totem pole, view two

Image depicts a child leaning against the base of a totem pole. The pole shows a human figure with an open mouth. See also item a034827 for another view of this pole.

According to George Read, Stanley Read's son, the pole in the image is the Half Way Out pole of Delgamuukw's house; the boy is Harry Brown, whose Gitxsan name is Xsuwii 'Guus.

Two totem poles

Image depicts two poles standing in an open area. The front pole features a human-like creature on visible portion. The back pole also includes a human figure at the bottom with an owl on top. The figures on the bottom may be crest figures (Leading In or Halfway Out) or a Man of the Wild. Read's note suggests that one of these may be a Pole of Hrkyadet at Kispiox.

Fallen totem pole

Image depicts a totem pole lying on the ground. Figures are difficult to identify, but the most prominent one is probably human. Read`s diary indicates that this photo was probably taken at either the Kitwanga or Kispiox village site in Gitxsan territory of the Skeena Valley..

Totem poles along a road

Image depicts a row of totem poles standing along the side of a dirt road. Based on Read`s diary and the figures on these poles, this photo may have been taken in Kitwanga, and the pole on the far left may be the Dog Salmon Pole.

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