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Book 6, tape 1: Learning Kwak'wala Series, Saying Everyday Things

Item consists of a recording of the Learning Kwak’wala book 6: Saying Everyday Things, and it features Agnes Cranmer, Margaret Cook, and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer and Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak’wala; Side A: pages 6-15, covers how someone is and what they are doing,; Side B: pages 16-26, covers how someone is and what they are doing, the future tense, and the past tense. Recorded on both sides.

Tsimshian and Tillamook Coast Salish songs recorded by Dr. Viola Garfield

Item is a recording with two distinct parts. The first part of the recording features Tsimshian songs recorded in 1932 by the American anthropologist Dr. Viola Garfield (1899-1983) of the University of Washington. The songs in this recording were sung by Lewis Grey (1857-1934) who was born in Port Simpson and was recognized as a shaman by the Nass River tribes and upper Skeen River people. The cylinder number referenced during the recording is #14573. The Dr. Viola Garfield fonds is housed at the University of Washington Special Collections. She carried out field work in the summer of 1932, 1935 and 1937 at the Tsimshian village of Port Simpson, British Columbia. An Ediphone machine provided by the University of Washington Anthropology Department was used to record and store the songs on wax cylinders, which were deposited at the University. The recordings were transferred to the open reel format in 1971. More information is available in Dr. Viola Garfield's book Tsimshian Clan and Society (1939), available in the MOA Reading Room, call number 12.7 TSI GAR.

The second portion of the recording starts at 8:26, when an unidentified male speaker states that the remainder of the tape are Tilamook recordings made by Prof Melville Jacobs of the University of Washington recorded in the Winter of 1933 using an Ediphone cylinder. The speaker states that the first three songs are Tillamook Coast Salish North West Orgeon songs, sung by Clara Pearson, the informant of Elizabeth Jacobs in late 1933, and recorded at Garibaldi, Oregon. The speaker states that two songs are possibly in one of the Muckleshoot Reservation dialects. The speaker states that Song 1, Tit Willow, is possibly sung by the American anthropologist Dr. Erna Gunther.

Accompanying documentation for this recording contains the following text:
B. Johnstone, November 15, 1971
Tsimshian Songs Recorded by Viola Garfield
Tape Two
000 - Song #18 - Louis Gray - Taunting Song
100 - Song #19 - Louis Gray - Nursing Song
145 - Song #20 - Louis Gray - Dancing Society song
180 - Tillamook recordings made by Jacobs in Garabaldi, Ore., 1933.
Ni-sgane’-s are a ganhada chief house of the ginad‚iks tribe

Book 6, tape 2: Learning Kwak'wala Series, Saying Everyday Things

Item consists of a recording of the Learning Kwak’wala book 6: Saying Everyday Things, and it features Agnes Cranmer, Margaret Cook, and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer and Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak’wala; Side A: pages 27-42, continues with the exercises on page 27, and covers the future tense, the past tense, plural we endings distinguishing between ones that include or exclude someone, plural you form, the forms of plural they that distinguish between whether the group is present or absent, and the grammar to say "to eat"; Side B: pages 43-54, and continues with the exercises for the verb "to eat, and covers yes/no dialogues, and the grammar for "do," "am," and "very," and stops halfway through the vocabulary on page 54. Jay Powell mistakenly introduces the tape as side one, but begins where side stopped. Recorded on both sides.

Book 7, tape 1: Learning Kwak'wala Series, This One, That One

Item consists of a recording of the Learning Kwak’wala book 7: This One, That One, and it features Agnes Cranmer, Margaret Cook, and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer and Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak’wala; Side A: pages 4-12. covers sentences with objects and pointer words, using these forms with different verb tenses, plural subjects, referring to people who are present or absent, stops just before the English translation for the last sentence on page 12.; Side B: pages 13-26, continues with the exercises on page 13 and covers the we "including you" and we "not including you" forms, other verbs that take objects an their present, past, and future forms, and other pointer words, stops midway through the examples on page 26. Recorded on both sides.

Tsimshian songs recorded by Dr. Viola Garfield

Item is a recording of Tsimshian songs recorded by the American anthropologist Dr. Viola Garfield (1899-1983) of the University of Washington. The songs in this recording were sung by Matthew Johnson (ca. 1867 - ?) who was one of the leading lineage heads of the G-spaxlo-‘ts tribe, and a great admirer of the lineage of the Tsimshian chief, Legaic” (Legaik, Legex). The title Legaic was carried by at least four chiefs of the Tsimshian Eage Clan. The last-known individual to carry the title took it in 1938.The cylinder numbers referenced during the recording are #14561, #14562, #14563, #14564 .

The Dr. Viola Garfield fonds is housed at the University of Washington Special Collections. She carried out field work in the summer of 1932, 1935 and 1937 at the Tsimshian village of Port Simpson, British Columbia. An Ediphone machine provided by the University of Washington Anthropology Department was used to record and store the songs on wax cylinders, which were deposited at the University. The recordings were transferred to the open reel format in 1971. More information is available in Dr. Viola Garfield's book Tsimshian Clan and Society (1939), available in the MOA Reading Room, call number 12.7 TSI GAR.

A document that accompanied this recording contains the following text:
Document text:
Cylinder 14561
000 - Song # 1 - Matthew Johnson - marriage song composed for the wedding of Legaik’s sister to ni•s nawa•
030 - Song # 2 - Matthew Johnson - entertainment and potlaching song, a song belonging to Legaik
080 - Song #3 - Matthew Johnson - supernatural power song ni•s nawa, Sky Spirit
137 - Song #4 - Matthew Johnson - a winant secret society power song belonging to ni•s nawa• Kilutsan chief
168 - Song #5 - Matthew Johnson – a secret society song or ludzista•l song
Cylinder 14562
190 - Song #6 - Matthew Johnson, a dog eater society song. nute•m, ni•s nawa, giluska’u
255 - Song #7 - Matthew Johnson –
300 - Song #8 - Matthew Johnson - boasting song for potlatch of Legaic’s tribe
Cylinder 14563
385 - Song #10 - Matthew Johnson - supernatural power song. Legaik, wiskani•st
475 - Song #11 - Matthew Johnson - dirge ni•s nawa• limkoi
530 - Song #12 - Matthew Johnson - dirge gispaxbts, gilutsa’u
588 - Song #13 - Matthew Johnson - dirge
Cylinder 14564
614 - Song #14 - Mrs. Marsden (sp.?) – wolf clan song of kitsees
665 - Song #15 - Mrs. Marsden - song belonging to the supernatural power name lugaxli’bam laxha belonging to ni•syagane•t
774 - Song #16 - Mrs. Marsden - ni•sgune (gitsecs) supernatural power song
825 - Song #17 - Mrs. Marsden – supernatural (naxnog) power song, house of welk

Book 9, tape 1: Learning Kwak'wala Series

Item consists of a recording of the Learning Kwak’wala Book 9: Workbook and accompanies Book 6: Saying Everyday Things, and it features Agnes Cranmer, Margaret Cook, and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer and Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak’wala; Side A: pages 4-15; Side B: pages 16-27, 32-33. Recorded on both sides, : Side A stops early near the end of the exercise on page 15; skips game portions of the workbook; Side B stops early halfway through the exercise on page 33. Recorded on both sides.

Book 9, tape 2: Learning Kwak'wala Series

Item consists of a recording of the Learning Kwak’wala book 9: Workbook and accompanies Book 6: Saying Everyday Things, and it features Agnes Cranmer, Margaret Cook, and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer and Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak’wala; Side A: pages 33-57, continues from the rest of the exercise on page 33, and skips the game portions of the workbook. While Jay Powell says that the answers for the game portions are on side B, no audio was recorded on that side. Recorded on Side A, no sound on Side B.

Book 10, tape 1: Learning Kwak'wala Series

Item consists of a recording of the Learning Kwak’wala book 10: Workbook, and it features Agnes Cranmer, Margaret Cook, and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer and Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak’wala; Side A: pages 5-17, the exercise for page 13 in the book is different from the tape's version (with the exercise on page 14 according to the tape), and the pages on the tape are ahead by one from the workbook; Side B: pages 18-31. Recorded on both sides.

Book 10, tape 2: Learning Kwak'wala Series

Item consists of a recording of the Learning Kwak’wala book 10: Workbook and accompanies Book 7: This One – That One, and it features Agnes Cranmer, Margaret Cook, and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak’wala; Side A: pages 32-49; Side B: pages 50-59. Recorded on both sides.

Book 11, tape 1: Learning Kwak'wala Series

Item consists of a recording of the Learning Kwak’wala book 11: Workbook, and accompanies Book 8: Here and There, and it features Margaret Cook, Agnes Cranmer, and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer and Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak’wala; Side A: pages 4-22, the audio for page 13 includes examples not listed in the workbook, skips from page 15 to page 20, stop midway through the exercises on page 22; Side B: page 22-35, continues from the exercises on page 22, in the exercise for page 35 the last question uses "Indian Dancer" for the English translation of the sentence. Recorded on both sides.

Book 11, tape 2: Learning Kwak'wala Series

Item consists of a recording of the Learning Kwak’wala book 11: Workbook, and it features Agnes Cranmer, Margaret Cook, and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer and Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak’wala; Side A: pages 36-59, on page 39, "Indian" is used for the English translation of a sentence, skips the review on pages 51-54 and ends with the days of the week and the months. Recorded only on side A, no sound on side B.

Final lecture of Anthropology 301, April 3, 1974, “Resurgence of Indian Culture”

Item is an audio recording of a lecture given by Wilson Duff on the “Resurgence of Indian Culture.” On side A, Duff speaks on the failings of colonialist education systems, First Nations traditional knowledge, and his interpretations of Haida art. Works discussed include a Raven rattle and a chest carved by Charles Edenshaw. Side B continues with Duff’s observations on government interest in, and appropriation of, First Nations art and culture as symbols of Canadian identity, and cultural repatriation.

Book 1: My Village, My House

Item consists of a recording of Learning Kwak'wala: Book 1 My Village My House, and it features Agnes Cranmer, Margaret Cook, and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer and Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak'wala; Side A: pages 36, 4-18 begins with the Kwak'wala alphabet, and covers the vocabulary for the types of houses and villages, places in the villages their locations with a focus on Alert Bay and surrounding villages, where someone is going, asking what something is, things found at the breakwater, things found at the grocery store and how to express when someone wants something, things found in a school and phrases used in a school setting, vocabulary for things found in nature and how to describe the weather, for the English translation of bak'wam "Indian" is used; Side B: pages 19-33, and covers things used when camping and where things are in the camp, parts of a house and things found there, grammar for who owns a house, vocabulary associated with cooking, eating, and the kitchen, items found in the living room, items found in the bathroom, things in the bedroom, numbers and how to say how many houses and boats there are. Also begins book 2 with some of the vocabulary for family members, but this is also covered in the tape specific to book 2. Recorded on both sides.

House of Chief Albert Harry

Item is a photograph showing the family and relatives of Chief Albert Harry. From left to right: Kitty Harry, Albert Harry, Ned Wesley, Thomas Hailhemas and Mary Johnson-Walkus.

C. MacKay

Book 2: Learning Kwak'wala

Item consists of a recording of Learning Kwak'wala: Book 2 My Family My Friends, and it features Agnes Cranmer, Margaret Cook, and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer and Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak'wala; Side A: pages 31, 4-19 , starts with the alphabet sheet at the end of the workbook, and then covers the vocabulary for family members, grammar to express someone's family relationships, words to distinguish people by age, if someone knows someone else, words to describe people and the distinction when they are or are not present; Side B: pages 19-31, and continues how to describe people, and the distinction when they are or are not present, vocabulary for someone's job, counting how many family members someone has, vocabulary on asking is someone is Nimpkish and where they are from and the distinction between asking a man or a woman, vocabulary for where someone live, if someone knows how to speak Kwak'wala, and a review of the alphabet and suffixes used for pronouns and subjects, when describing someone who performs dances the English translation uses "Indian Dancer." Recorded on both sides.

Lecture on Women and bears, February 26, 1974

Item is an audio recording of a lecture given by Wilson Duff on “Women and Bears.” Duff uses the story of the woman who married a bear, represented in a Haida sculpture, to frame a discussion of the disenfranchisement of First Nations women under the Indian Act, the Lavell case (AG v. Lavell, 1971) and the Bedard case (R v. Bedard, 1973), and Haida and Nisga’a art. Lecture is recorded on both Side A and Side B.

Book 5: Learning Kwak'wala The Sounds of Kwak'wala

Item consists of a recording of Learning Kwak'wala: Book 5 The Sounds of Kwak'wala, and it features Agnes Cranmer, Margaret Cook, and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer and Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak’wala; Side A: pages 5-28, covers the names of most of the Kwak'wala speaking peoples and their dialects, the Kwak'wala alphabet, how to pronounce vowels, consonants, the glottal stop, and the barred Side B: pages 29-52, continues with how to pronounce the barred L, and covers the rest of the consonants, back consonant sounds, rounded consonant sounds, explosive consonant sounds, and double letter sounds, one English translation on page 33 refers to the cedar bark daces as "Indian dancing," also the English translation for someone of African descent on page 45 uses the word "Negro." Recorded on both sides.

Book 7, tape 2: Learning Kwak'wala

Item consists of a recording of Learning Kwak'wala: Book 7 This One That One, and it features Agnes Cranmer, Margaret Cook, and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer and Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak’wala; Side A: pages 26-40, starts with exercises for buying something that is or is not in sight, and continues with who something is for when they are or are not present, the grammar for doing something and the subject is either present or absent, past tense forms, future tense forms, pointer words, action words without objects, and action words that take objects; Side B: pages 40-57, continues past tense exercises on page 40, and covers how to say and adjective does not apply to someone, when someone is not doing something, the words for very and really, positive and negative answer patterns, grammar to ask what someone is doing, and what someone did in the past. Recorded on both sides.

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