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Chinook Jargon

Series is made up of records relating to the creation of a Chinook Jargon dictionary, a Big Book created for the Quileute on Chinook Jargon, and lessons for a Chinook Jargon class at Langara College. Powell documented the use of Chinook Jargon in LaPush during research on the Quileute language. His informants used Chinook Jargon regularly, and he began to research the history of its use on the Northwest Coast with the intention of writing a book about it. The manuscript for his book was accepted by the publishing company Douglas and McIntyre, but as Powell was not satisfied with his work, publication did not take place. However, he did produce a number of works that have been used for education purposes in LaPush as well as in British Columbia.

Series comprises six sub-series:
A. Research materials
B. Field notes and correspondence
C. Unpublished manuscript and lessons
D. Chinook Jargon dictionary files

Administration, public relations and correspondence

Series consists of records relating to McLennan’s administrative role as a curator at the MOA, including public relations (interviews given, lectures given, publications about the museum and his work), annual reports and correspondence (inquiries from interested parties regarding certain artifacts, events, people and donations at the museum). The majority of this series presents itself in textual records, however there are also digital records included as well. There are a large number of digital images in the file ‘Photographs’ which depict various stages in the museum development of MOA, significant artists, MOA grounds and landscape, special events and visitors and milestone occasions.

Correspondence

Series consists of two files of correspondence:

  1. Military Period (1921-1923)
  2. Other Correspondence (1961-1985)

Materials in the ‘Military Period’ file include ten letters written to, or by, Lt. Col. Parker while on duty as the Commander of the Military Forces in Tibet. Two other letters were written by Sir Charles Bell in which Bell arranges to meet up with Lt. Col. Parker and an escort on his return journey from Lhasa. One additional letter is handwritten in Tibetan and stamped with ‘British Trade Agency – Gyantse – Tibet’ (which suggests that it may be from Parker’s military period), but it is not kown who authored it or when it was created. Five of the letters are written in Tibetan and translations and transcriptions for four of the five letters are available in hard copy and on compact disc (see ‘Notes’).

Of significance among the letters written in Tibetan is correspondence from Lt. Col. Parker to the 13th Dalai Lama in which Lt. Col. Parker states that he has received and inspected the troops from the Dalai’s personal escort and suggests that they be kept for training. In this letter Lt. Col. Parker also raises question on military dress and deportment, specifically, the length of the officers’ hair (a translation of this letter was provided by Father Donald but no original copy of the translation exists). An original draft of this letter, written in English by Lt. Col. Parker, is also included in this file. A second letter is from the Dalai Lama to Lt. Col. Parker and is an acknowledgement of Parker’s training of Tibetan soldiers. This letter is written on rice paper and includes the Dalai’s official ink seal and an envelope with the Dalai’s wax seal and a postmarked Tibetan stamp. Three other letters were sent to Lt. Col. Parker from officials of the Tibetan government. These letters are also written on rice paper and ink stamped with official seals. The first of these letters is written by a member of the Tibetan Supreme Council (known as Shapes or Shapees) and is a response to Lt. Col. Parker’s questioning of hair length of the Tibetan troops, and includes explanations of cultural and religious differences. The second letter is from the minister responsible for the Tibetan military in which permission is granted for training of the Tibetan troops, and the sending of further troops to be trained. The third letter is written by two Tibetan Officers in which praise is given to one of their officers along with a request for his return. Of those letters mentioned above, translations and transcriptions are available for the letters written from the Dalai and the officials of the Tibetan government, and accompany the series.
The five other letters in this series include four that were typewritten by Lt. Col. Parker in English: two are from his military period; two others were written decades later to the editor of a publication. As mentioned above, one was written in Tibet and has not been translated. The two letters from his military period are lengthy and provide significant details of Lt. Col. Parker’s perceptions of his work, the people, the country, events and festivities and are an important accompaniment to many of the prints in Photograph Collection A.

Materials in the “Other Correspondence” file consist of more recent records. Two letters from 1961 relate to an address Lt. Col. Parker accepted to give to the Victoria Section of the Royal Over-Seas League about his experience in Tibet. The two other letters also relate to Lt. Col. Parker’s time in Tibet and were sent to the editor of “Country Life.” The first letter (dated 1966) describes Lt. Col. Parker’s unique experience of being the first European to see a Takin, “the rarest mammal in the world,” while the second letter (dated 1977) discusses a pony that Lt. Col. Parker bought in the early 1920s. The file also contains a letter (dated 1985) from the Office of Tibet in New York City acknowledging receipt of a donation for $20.00 along with a brief update on certain individuals. This letter is signed by two people; one, “T.C. Tethong,” was the translator for the 14th Dalai Lama in the 1960s.

ref # 4-1

Photographs

The series consists of over 600 hundred black-and-white photographs and negatives that relate to Lt. Col. Parker and his wife’s time in Tibet (1921- 1924), and a collection of more recent colour photographs of Tibetan objects that were collected by the couple. The majority of the b&w photographs were taken by Lt. Col. Parker during his military period, as well as the year following his release. The images depict military scenes, festivals and events, individual and group portraits, as well as various landscapes and architecture. Significant among these photographs are images of: the photographer who accompanied famed British climber, George Mallory; the Dalai Lama’s personal escort; and the first Lhasa Apso dogs out of Tibet. A small number of images (e.g., those of the Dalai Lama in 1910-1911) predate Lt. Col. Parker’s time in Tibet and are believed to have been given to him by some unknown person(s). The original photographs were not labelled; however, valuable contextual information has been provided by Father Donald, whose descriptions and commentary accompany a large number of these images (see Item List).

The prints are located in two photograph albums identified as Photograph Collections A & B. Photograph Collection A contains 243 b&w photographs, all of which are considered to be original prints. Although duplicates of images occur, these simply represent copies developed on different paper. It was reported (by Father Donald) that the last 48 photographs in this album were found loose and spread throughout Lt. Col. Parker’s papers. A total of 189 prints in Photograph Collection A have acetate negatives. Collection B contains 170 b&w photographs, of which all are considered original prints. A total of 67 b&w prints in Photograph Collection B have acetate negatives. Collection B also contains 74 colour photographs of artefacts to which there are no negatives. Duplicates of 68 b&w prints exist between the Photograph Collections A & B.

The series also includes 210 b&w negatives which correspond in number and sequence to print images found in Photograph Collection A: 193 negatives have corresponding prints; 17 negatives have no prints associated with them. A small number of negatives are duplicated. There are no negatives for the colour prints.

Accompanying the series is one compact disc (CD No. 5) consisting of 243 scanned b&w prints and 104 scanned negatives. The scanned prints also correspond in number and sequence to print images found in Photograph Collection A. Ten of the scanned negatives have acetate negatives but no prints associated with them; one scanned negative has neither acetate negative nor print (see Item List).

Projects and events

Series consists of records created by William McLennan in the course of planning and photographing various projects and events at MOA.

Projects are considered as having a longer duration, often occuring outside of the physical museum building, and in cooperation with other bodies. McLennan often liaised with First Nation communities and artists during the planning stages of projects.

Events are considered as having occurred over a short period of time. Events were attended by McLennan as a MOA representative and photograph.

On both projects and events McLennan took on larger roles in addition to photographer such as community liason, presenting on topics, and designer. Each project and event comprises their own sub-series.

Northwest Coast First Nations artifacts research

This series consists of graphic and textual materials related to Sawyer’s research on Northwest Coast artifacts. Graphic materials in this series include slides, photographs, and drawings of artifacts. Textual records in this series consists of research material and iconic analysis cards complied and/or accumulated by Sawyer, or by his students, regarding Northwest Coast artifacts. Other textual records include correspondence Sawyer had with various museums regarding Northwest Coast items in their collections.

ref # 13-1

Alan R. Sawyer

Northwest Coast First Nations artifacts research

This series consists of graphic and textual materials related to Sawyer’s research on Northwest Coast artifacts. Graphic materials in this series include slides, contact sheets, and drawings of artifacts. Textual records in this series consists of essays related to Sawyer’s research on Northwest Coast artifacts, museum catalogue lists, and iconic analysis cards complied and/or accumulated by Sawyer. Other textual records include correspondence Sawyer had with various museums regarding Northwest Coast artifacts in their collections.

ref # 13-2

Alan R. Sawyer

Tait

Series documents Nisga’a artist Norman Tait and his crew of carvers during a period in which they were prolific in their creation of totem poles.

Jensen first met Tait in the early 1970s when she would photographic artists’ works for Bud Mintz, Vancouver gallery owner.  In 1985 she had the idea to produce a book documenting the carving of a totem pole from start to finish.  She approached Tait, who initially refused but called Jensen back just a few days later to take her up on the offer, after being commissioned to create a pole for the Native Education Centre in Vancouver.

Jensen photographed Tait and his crew, which consisted of his brother Robert (Chip), his cousin Harry Martin (Hammy), his nephew Wayne Young and his eldest son Isaac (Ikey). She also made notes and audio recordings of Tait’s lessons to his crew, most of whom had never worked on such a large project. The photographs and tapes were used in the creation of the book Where the People Gather: Carving a Totem Pole. The project also led to the publication of a children’s version, Carving a Totem Pole and a paperback version titled Totem Pole Carving. The books were published in the early 1990s.

Jensen documented Tait’s next two major commissions: two poles for Capilano Mall in 1986, and a pole for Stanley Park in 1987.

In 1987 Tait adopted Jensen into the Nisga’a Eagle Clan and began to teach her about the responsibilities that came with the honour. The lessons were put into practice in 2001 when Tait asked Vickie to guard the body of a family member that had died.

The series includes photographic records of the creation of the four poles; audio recordings of lessons and interviews with Tait; transcripts of the audio tapes; and notes. The series consists of five sub-series:

A. Native Education Centre (NEC) pole photographs
B. Capilano Mall and Stanley Park poles photographs
C. Misc. photographs
D. Tait family and crew artists’ photographs
E. Audio tapes and transcripts.

Miscellaneous project records

Series documents projects Cunningham took on outside of his main roles at MOA. Cunningham was involved in MOA’s identity development in the late 1990s, and participated in shop product development around this time. He also provided external consultation to other museums and UBC departments. Included in this series is material regarding MOA exhibition cases at YVR Airport pre-dating Cunningham’s time at the museum. Records include correspondence, drawings, measurements, and photographs.

Student papers

Series consists of notes and papers written by Duff when he was an anthropology student at UBC.

Correspondence

Series consists of letters sent to Duff, occasionally accompanied by articles or manuscripts. There are a few copies of letters from Duff.

Personal and missionary photographs

Series consist of loose photographs, a newspaper clipping, photomechanical prints, and one photomechanical print album produced and collected throughout Rev. Crosby’s personal and missionary life, including portraits and group photographs of aboriginal individuals and/or missionaries, photographs of churches, schools, homes, hospitals, and other buildings, and aboriginal cultural and ceremonial objects (artifacts and curios). In addition, photographic events include carvings, church congregations, gathering of aboriginal children from residential schools, weddings, and funerals. Geographic locations depicted in the photographs include (but are not limited to): Chilliwack, Cultus Lake, Fort Essington, Fort Rupert, Fraser River, Greenville, Gold Harbour, Massett Village, Naas River, Port Simpson, River Inlet, Skidegate (Haida), Yale, and Vancouver Island (Nanaimo, Victoria) all in British Columbia; as well as, Whatcom County Washington, USA; Fort Wraugh, Alaska; Port Chester, Alaska; Montreal, Quebec; Norway; and Labrador. Series includes photographers and photograph studios such as Noah Shakespeare, Richard & Hanna Maynard, Carlo Gentile, J.G. Parks, Thos. E. Perkins, Geo Rirton, B.F. Howland & Co., J.M. Jacobsen, Wadds Bros., N. Caple & Co., Hugill, R.Z. Tashiro, Butcher & Co., Brooks, Skene Lowe, Nathan Joseph & Co., and S.A. Spencer. Photographers Carlo Gentile (whose Victoria studio was purchased by Noah Shakespeare) and Frederick Dally (whose negatives were partly acquired by Richard & Hanna Maynard) may also be included but unidentified. Series includes photomechanical prints, albumen prints, cabinet cards, carte-de-visites, gelatin printing-out papers, gelatin developing-out papers, a ferrotype, stereograph prints, and other unidentified print types.

FILE LIST: (with box-folder number, title, and dates)
1-1: Personal and missionary photographs – portraits (and ferrotype), ca. 1860
1-2 : Missionary photographs – reproductions, [199-]
1-3 : Missionary photographs – stereograph cards, 1863 – [191-]
1-4 : Missionary photographs – totem poles and artifacts, 1863 – [191-]
1-5 : Missionary photographs – photomechanical, 1863 – [191-]
2-1 : Personal and missionary photographs, 1863 – [191-]
2-2 : Missionary photographs – artifacts, 1863 – [191-]
2-3 : Missionary photographs – glad tidings, 1863 – [191-]
2-4 : Missionary photographs – Alaska, 1863 – [191-]
2-5 : Missionary photographs – Bella Bella, B.C., 1863 – [191-]
2-6 : Missionary photographs – Chilliwack, B.C. and Cultus Lake, B.C., 1863 – [191-]
2-7 : Missionary photographs – Hazelton, B.C. and Kispiox, B.C. ,1863 – [191-]
2-8 : Missionary photographs – Mission, B.C. and River Inlet, B.C., 1863 – [191-]
2-9 : Missionary photographs – Port Essington, B.C., 1863 – [191-]
2-10 : Missionary photographs – Port Simpson, B.C., 1863 – [191-]
2-11 : Missionary photographs – Vancouver Island, B.C., 1863 – [191-]
2-12 : Missionary photographs – Washington, USA, 1863 – [191-]
2-13 : Missionary photographs – Naas River, B.C., 1863 – [191-]
2-14 : Missionary photographs, 1863 – [191-]

Thomas Crosby

Donation letter

Series consists of a letter written by May Ashurrtt to Museum Director Michael Ames on October 31, 1977. The letter provides details of the donated photographs and the life of Frederich H. Maude, the photographer.

Student Project files

Series consists of records relating to display units and museum exhibits that were done by students of Anthropology 431 and Anthropology 432 (course titles included Museum Practice and Curatorship, Anthropology of Public Presentation, and Museum Studies and Principles). The records are group assignments that include journals, correspondence, permissions for use, exhibit receipts, exhibit proposals, agreement forms, interview transcripts, research notes, design sketches, invitations, colour samples, samples of mounting materials, colour printouts, negatives, slides and photographs.

The records are divided into the following sub-series:

A Visible Storage 1994
B Gallery Design Concepts 1994
C What Are You Looking At? 1998
D A Break in the Ice 1998-1999
E Who is This Benetton Anyway? 2001
F Koerner Gallery 2001
G Viewpoints 2002
H Celadon: Beyond the Glaze 2003
I Site to Sight: Imaging the Sacred 2004
J The Multiverse Gallery rotational project 2013
K Syllabi and Teaching Files 1999-2013

Administration files

Series consists of textual records related to Dr. Halpin’s administrative activities while she was the curator of Ethnology at the Museum of Anthropology. Records include correspondence, memoranda, reports, minutes, applications, agendas, grants, budgets, exhibition schedules, newsletters, pamphlets and internal review reports related to museum policies and the development of the museum’s acquisition policy. There are also records related to various committees, curriculum reports, and acquisition evaluations for specific items which were considered for purchase by the museum.

Museum of Anthropology events

Series consists of correspondence, memoranda, newsletters, pamphlets and
newspaper clippings of events that Dr. Halpin either organized, or assisted, while working at the Museum of Anthropology. Records relate to the opening of the museum in 1976 and to various visiting scholars who gave lectures or organized activities between 1975-1986. Also included are records relating to two events which took place at the Museum of Anthropology: the Norman Tait Barbecue, an open public event for all to attend; and Inuit Art Round Table, during which issues related to Inuit art were discussed by a panel of curators and First Nations people.

Teaching and student files

Series consists of records related to Dr. Halpin’s activities as a professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia. Records include student evaluations of the internship program supervised by Dr. Halpin from 1983-1984 while she was Acting Director of the Museum of Anthropology, permission forms for a student project which Dr. Halpin consulted on, notes on an expansion of the department curriculum, reports, and records related to the source book for ANTH 432 which consists of two pictures, photocopied articles and course bibliography.

General Administration Files

Series consists of correspondence and memoranda, minutes, reports, contracts and agreements, handwritten notations, draft copies, newspaper clippings, photographs, slides, and other textual and graphic records related to the general administration of the museum and the administrative activities and responsibilities of the Director. Includes records related to museum policies and procedures and their development, the planning of museum activities and goals, the evaluation and accountability of the museum, including files containing museum annual report information and files regarding reviews of the museum, records regarding contracts and agreements made by the museum, and records related to various museum committees. The series also includes records related to the administration of the museum in general, including files regarding the early history of the museum, executive committee and staff meetings and memoranda, as well as files of correspondence and minutes of meetings relating to communications and involvement with the Dean of Arts and the President’s Office.

The series is divided into the following subseries:

A. General Files 1971-2009

B. Policies and Procedures Files 1975-1998

C. Planning Files 1976-2009

D. Accountability and Evaluation Files 1974-ca. 2013

E. Contracts and Agreements Files 1976-1993

F. Committees Files 1970-2009

Photographs

Series consists of photographs, negative and slides documenting activities of the Museum of Anthropology. Most activities took place at the museum, but some took place elsewhere. The activities documented include exhibit openings, exhibit preparation, celebrations, artists working, presentations, conferences, workshops, and notable guests.
Slides in subseries 1-5 are stored in five binders, arranged chronologically. Photographs, negatives and slides in subseries 6-8 are stored in boxes, arranged according to the events they depict. Slides in subseries 9 are stored in a box, arranged topically.

University of British Columbia. Museum of Anthropology. Public Programming and Education

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