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Bill Reid
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Interview with Bill Reid about Celebration of the Raven Part 1

Item is the first of a three part sound recording of an interview with Bill Reid about the origins of his carving The Raven and the First Men, located at MOA. The interviewer is unknown. During the interview Bill Reid discusses how the sculpture was the result of a highly collaborative process involving other artists, his impression of the location of the carving in MOA, and his working relationship with Walter C. Koerner who commissioned the sculpture. He lastly discusses his representation and interpretation of the Haida legend that the carving is based on. This recording is part of Celebration of the Raven which documented the creation of the Raven and the First Men Sculpture, its relocation to the Museum of Anthropology, and the unveiling by the Prince of Wales in 1982.

[Bill Reid makes his cut]

Image is of Bill Reid using adze to make his first cut. Doreen Jensen and unidentified persons stand behind him, watching the process.

[Handing out oranges]

Image is of Rob't Tait holding box of oranges that he offers to an unidentified person and Bill Reid as refreshments.

Kuldip Gill fonds

  • 7
  • Fonds
  • 1978

Fonds consists of 21 photographs from the 1978 Bill Reid pole raising ceremony at Skidegate, an event at which Gill was an observer.

Kuldip Gill

Lecture by Haida artist Bill Reid

Item is an audio recording of a lecture by Haida artist Bill Reid, who discusses the transition in Northwest West Coast art from its primarily ceremonial function within First Nations society to the present day when, in his words, art is made almost exclusively for sale to the non-Indian community. The recording is Lecture #8 in the University of British Columbia's Center for Continuing Education Lecture Series on Traditions of North West Coast Indian Culture.

Model, B. Reid, Raven and Clam myth

Image of Bill Reid's small boxwood sculpture "The Raven Discovering Mankind in a Clam Shell," which he completed in 1970. He was later commissioned to make a much larger version of this sculpture for the Museum of Anthropology, which he titled "The Raven and the First Men."

Bill Reid's Bear sculture

Image of an Bill Reid's bear sculpture, taken at the University of British Columbia. This sculpture is part of MOA's object collection.

Dr. Walter Koerner commissioned Reid to make this sculpture for his personal collection. It was originally commissioned for his backyard garden, but Koerner decided it looked too large for the space so he donated it to UBC. It was installed on the UBC campus in 1963, in the woods near International House. A bronze plaque made for that location reads: Haida Bear by Bill Reid Presented to UBC by Walter C. Koerner 1963. At some point, after the new Museum building was built, the bear was transferred to MOA and moved indoors.

Anthony Carter

House Frontal Totem Pole, UBC Totem Park

Image of a pole carved as the frontal pole for the front of the Haida house, at UBC, for display in Totem Park. Moved to the new Museum of Anthropology grounds in 1978. Pole was removed from the Haida House in 2000-09 and placed in a greenhouse tent for conservation treatment and drying. A new pole was raised outside to replace it (see MOA object Nb1.752). Jim Hart, with Reg Davidson, Michael Nicoll and Tyler Crosby, performed a small informal ceremony for the re-raising of the pole on Oct. 30, 2002 (with Martine Reid in attendance). Pole was then re-raised in the Great Hall of the Museum on Oct. 31, 2002.

Anthony Carter

George Szanto fonds

  • 138
  • Fonds
  • May 1962

Fonds consists of eight slides of totem poles being raised in the Haida Village at the University of British Columbia (UBC). The slides are dated May, 1962. The photographs were taken by George Szanto, the son-in-law of Geoffrey Andrew who was the Dean and Deputy President of UBC from 1947 to 1962.

The totem poles represented in the images were carved by Haida artist Bill Reid and 'Namgis artist Doug Cranmer. They were originally situated at UBC's Totem Park. They are now located on the grounds behind the Museum of Anthropology, and modelled on a 19th century Haida village.

George Szanto

Bill Reid watching the construction of the Haida house

Item is a colour image of Bill Reid observing the construction of the Haida house at the Haida Village at Totem Park at the University of British Columbia (UBC). The Memorial Pole appears on the left; the Double Mortuary Pole appears on the right

Bill swinging an adze

Image features a profile view of Bill Reid using a traditional, well-sharpened tool, called adze to cut away the outer the sap wood of a log. The adze appears blurred as he is about to strike the log.

Bill Reid's speech

Image is of Bill Reid standing in front of the canoe log and delivering his address at the welcome ceremony.

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