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archivistische beschrijving
Kwakwaka'wakw
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Photographs from album

File contains images of the First Nation artists involved with the Through My Eyes exhibit. The images show them looking at objects in the Vancouver Museum's collection. The artists shown in the photographs are Cyril Carpenter, Ben Davidson, Robert Davidson, Norman Tait, Isabel Rorick, Doreen Jensen, Judge Alfred Scow, Lyle Wilson, Dolly Watts, Bill Reid, Glen Tallio, Richard Hunt, Terry Starr, Tim Paul, Richard Summer, Dempsey Bob, Jim Hart, and William White.

Canoes

File contains a combination of historical and modern day images of canoes used by First Nation groups living on the Northwest Coast. The historical images contain images of village life and uses of the canoe in a historical context. The modern day images show canoes housed in various museums in Canada and the United States. The textual records contained in this file are photocopies of images of canoes, both from historical photographs and of modern day photographs.

Village People

File contains images of various First Nations Cultural groups from the Pacific Northwest. The images include negatives and slides of Northwest Coast villages, totem poles, longhouses, and First Nations peoples dressed in regalia.

General Salish

This file contains images of Coast Salish and Kwakwaka'waku artifacts. Many of the photos are official photographs taken by various museums in Canada and the United States, but others are historical photos. These artifacts include masks, rattles, carvings, fishing equipment and fish processing, canoes, and North Coast architecture, such as long houses and house posts.

Kwakwaka'wakw

File contains a combination of images of Kwakwaka'wakw artifacts housed in various museums and images of historical Kwakwaka'wakw villages on Vancouver Island and along the Northwest Coast of British Columbia. Artifacts include totem poles, bentwood boxes, carvings, masks, and Kwakwaka'wakw artwork such as paintings and drawings. There are historical photographs of the following villages: Gwat'sinuxw (Quatsino), Kwikwasutinuxw (Gilford Island), A'wa'etlala Village (Knight's Inlet), Mamalikala (Village Island), Wiwekalu Village of T'la'mataxw (Campbell River), Kwixa Village (Salmon River), Dunaxda'xw Village (New Vancouver), and Gwa'sala Village (Smith Inlet). The textual records include information about some of the photographs, identifying items such as the people, the villages, and/or the artifacts depicted in the photographs.

Photos of canoes

File contains images of canoes from various Northwest Coast First Nations communities including Tsimshian, Haida, Nuxalk, Kwakwaka'wakw and Nuu-chah-nulth.

Canoe label

File contains information about the Northwest Coast canoe including how they're made, their importance, and their history. There are also photocopied images of canoes from the Nuu-chah-nulth and the Kwakwaka'wakw communities.

CMC houses project

This subseries contains records relating to an exhibit built at the Canadian Museum of Civilization. McLennan was the project manager and design developer for this project. He oversaw the completion and installation of six west coast First Nation house designs: Coast Salish, Haida, Tsimshian, Bella Coola, Oweekeno, and Kwakwaka'wakw. The records include newspaper clippings, correspondence, photographs, and notes.

The Pacific Passage

Image depicts the exhibition The Pacific Passage installed at the Vancouver International Airport. The focal point of the photograph is Hetux, a large Thunderbird sculpture created by artist Connie Watts (Nuu-chah-nulth, Gitxsan and Kwakwaka'wakw).

Kwak’wala

The series contains records created during a number of visits and projects completed with the Kwakwaka'wakw of Alert Bay.

After meeting David Grubb at the Salish Conferences in the early 1970s, Jensen was invited by Grubb to attend a potlatch on Gilford Island, just off Alert Bay. It was the first potlatch that she attended, and Jensen photographed it in black and white without flash.

Around the same time, Gloria Cranmer Webster began involving her UBC colleague Powell in discussions on the development of a Kwak’wala orthography. The two worked on this project during their breaks at work, with the main end goal to create accurate labels for artefacts at the museum, then located in the basement of the library on campus.

In 1975, after she moved back to Alert Bay, Webster contacted Powell and asked him to assist her in the creation of a language and culture book for Kwak’wala speaking people. Powell travelled to Alert Bay, the first of many trips to do such work. Over the next few years, Powell and Jensen were invited to Alert Bay on a number of occasions to attend potlatches, pole raisings, and other community events. Jensen photographed the events, as well as other aspects of the community such as the day care and band school.

In 1980 Webster, on behalf of the U’Mista Cultural Centre, secured salaries for both Jensen and Powell for one full year. They were hired to produce language and culture books, but in reality helped with many other aspects leading to the opening of the Centre. They rented a house in the village and lived there full time for the year, immersing themselves in the community, and creating a body of records that integrates both work and community life. Jensen had permission to photograph extensively, and these are all included in this series. Powell did linguistic research and worked with teachers from both the band school and the provincial school that were located in the village. Jensen also photographed language and culture lessons to be used in the books being produced. During the year they lived in Alert Bay, they produced 12 language books and a teacher’s manual for U’mista.

In 1982 Powell and Jensen purchased a house in Alert Bay, further cementing their intentions to maintain connections to the community. They continued to attend and photograph events and potlatches between projects.

In 1983 the Kwak’wala Teacher Training Program (KTTP) was developed by Powell and Jensen. The program was a college credit course for local area teachers to train them to lead language and culture lessons in their classes. Jensen and Powell divided their teaching duties, involving another teacher named Joy Wild. The program was successful for two years.

Over the next 20 years many of their visits were social in nature, although they continued to keep a detailed record of the events they attended. In 2001 they completed a CD-ROM for the Learning Kwak’wala series. This project had been ongoing for some time.

The series also contains photographic records of two events that took place outside the realm of the language projects. The Canadian Museum of Civilisation hired Doug Cranmer to carve a new Wakas Pole to replace the decaying version in Stanley Park and contacted Jensen to document the event. The second set of photographs records a trip organised by U’Mista Cultural Centre for scholars and experts to visit Mimkwamlis (Village Island) and T’sadzis’nukwakme’ (New Vancouver).

The records kept in this series consist of recordings, photographs, research notes, draft teaching aids, and copies of completed resources for both children’s education and the KTTP.

The series consists of eleven sub-series:
A. U’Mista research/background
B. Research materials
C. Field notes
D. Publications
E. Kwak’wala teacher training program
F. Kwak’wala CD-ROM project
G. Kwak’wala photographs
H. Potlatch photographs.
I. Wakas pole raising in Stanley Park 1987 photographs
J. Trip to Village Island and Tzatsisnukomi (New Vancouver) photographs 2005.
K. Audio recordings

Vickie Jensen and Jay Powell fonds

  • 3
  • Archief
  • 1969-2008

Fonds consists of records relating to the numerous culture and language projects that Powell and Jensen worked on since 1976. The communities with which they worked include:
• The Quileute of La Push
• The Kwakwaka’wakw of Alert Bay
• The Gitxsan of Kispiox, Gitanyow, and surrounding villages
• The Nuu-chah-nulth of Vancouver Island
• The Musqueam of Vancouver
• The Seton Lake St'at'imc (Lillooet) of Shalalth
• The Shuswap of Alkali Lake, Soda Creek, Dog Creek, Canim Lake, and Sugar Cane
• The Haisla of Kitamaat
• The Nisga’a of Gingolx (Kincolith) and New Aiyansh

Most of the projects had an end goal to produce a book, language education materials, or teacher training materials. Often the education materials incorporated cultural lessons throughout. The records created in the production of the books are varied and reflect the intrinsic connection between language, culture, and daily activities in the communities. Powell and Jensen were co-editors for nearly all of the language books and materials produced. Although some of the projects reflected in the records were done primarily by Powell or primarily by Jensen, the vast majority of the work involves collaboration between the two in some aspect. As Jensen and Powell immersed themselves in the communities they worked for, often their personal photographs and records are interspersed with those relating to their work. This community involvement enhanced their relationships with the people with whom they were working and allowed them to experience and participate in cultural activities as part of those communities. This close relationship is reflected in and is integral to their work. Jensen and Powell have two sons: Nels, born in 1978, and Luke, born in 1981. Their sons travelled with them to the communities in which they worked and lived, and on their work trips and sabbaticals. Nels and Luke are also present in many of the photographic records.

The records contain a mixture of research, field notes, administrative records, and publications at various stages, in addition to audio and visual records. Field notes, for the most part handwritten, and archival research into language and culture groups was undertaken by Powell, whilst the majority of the photography, found in a variety of formats, was done by Jensen. Manuscripts and final publications were a combined effort and are included at various stages. Administrative records, including grant proposals, are found throughout.

Fonds consists of 13 series of records. Series are arranged according to community and/or project, and include:

  1. Quileute
  2. Chinook Jargon
  3. Kwak’wala (U’Mista)
  4. Gitxsan
  5. Nuu-chah-nulth
  6. Salishan
  7. Shuswap
  8. Haisla
  9. Tait
  10. Northwest Coast artists
  11. Northwest Coast groups
  12. UBC totems/events
  13. Publications

Vickie Jensen and Jay Powell

Book 10, tape 2: Learning Kwak'wala Series

Item consists of a recording of the Learning Kwak’wala book 10: Workbook and accompanies Book 7: This One – That One, and it features Agnes Cranmer, Margaret Cook, and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak’wala; Side A: pages 32-49; Side B: pages 50-59. Recorded on both sides.

Book 11, tape 2: Learning Kwak'wala Series

Item consists of a recording of the Learning Kwak’wala book 11: Workbook, and it features Agnes Cranmer, Margaret Cook, and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer and Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak’wala; Side A: pages 36-59, on page 39, "Indian" is used for the English translation of a sentence, skips the review on pages 51-54 and ends with the days of the week and the months. Recorded only on side A, no sound on side B.

Book 11, tape 1: Learning Kwak'wala Series

Item consists of a recording of the Learning Kwak’wala book 11: Workbook, and accompanies Book 8: Here and There, and it features Margaret Cook, Agnes Cranmer, and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer and Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak’wala; Side A: pages 4-22, the audio for page 13 includes examples not listed in the workbook, skips from page 15 to page 20, stop midway through the exercises on page 22; Side B: page 22-35, continues from the exercises on page 22, in the exercise for page 35 the last question uses "Indian Dancer" for the English translation of the sentence. Recorded on both sides.

Book 9, tape 2: Learning Kwak'wala Series

Item consists of a recording of the Learning Kwak’wala book 9: Workbook and accompanies Book 6: Saying Everyday Things, and it features Agnes Cranmer, Margaret Cook, and Jay Powell engaging in vocabulary and grammar exercises in the workbook, Jay Powell asks the questions in English and Agnes Cranmer and Margaret Cook give the response in Kwak’wala; Side A: pages 33-57, continues from the rest of the exercise on page 33, and skips the game portions of the workbook. While Jay Powell says that the answers for the game portions are on side B, no audio was recorded on that side. Recorded on Side A, no sound on Side B.

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